Cityscape Residential awarded for “elevating” the old church

title=sCity of Lee’s Summit Historic Preservation Commission. “The original church building had not been occupied or heated for some time, so the finishes and structure were in sturdy condition, but the bones were beautiful,” said Ryan Adams, Cityscape Residential vice president for Kansas City.” title=”Cityscape Residential’s restoration and adapted use of the 1922 Methodist Church received the 2022 Graves/Hale Historic Preservation Award from the City of Lee’s Summit Historic Preservation Commission. “The original church building had not been occupied or heated for some time, so the finishes and structure were in sturdy condition, but the bones were beautiful,” said Ryan Adams, Cityscape Residential vice president for Kansas City.” loading=”lazy”/>

Cityscape Residential’s restoration and adapted use of the 1922 Methodist Church received the 2022 Graves/Hale Historic Preservation Award from the City of Lee’s Summit Historic Preservation Commission. “The original church building had not been occupied or heated for some time, so the finishes and structure were in sturdy condition, but the bones were beautiful,” said Ryan Adams, Cityscape Residential vice president for Kansas City.

courtesy photo

Cityscape Residential’s partners weren’t new to building at Lee’s Summit, but it was something old that gave the company a long-awaited downtown project.

Cityscape’s restoration and adapted use of the 1922 Methodist Church at 114 SE Douglas St. received the 2022 Graves/Hale Historic Preservation Award from the City of Lee’s Summit Historic Preservation Commission earlier this year. The award, established to honor the work of Lee’s Summit historians Frank Graves and Don Hale, recognizes those “dedicated to interpreting, preserving, and promoting the preservation and adaptive reuse of buildings, neighborhoods, Structures and cultural landscapes used in Lee’s Summit. ”

Cityscape Partners have a history spanning more than two decades at Lee’s Summit.

“One of our partners has parents and a sister here,” said Ryan Adams, Cityscape Residential vice president for Kansas City. “We just completed our third church at Lee’s Summit and had been trying to find something downtown for six to eight years.

“When church property became vacant, we pounced on it.”

The church property became Elevate 114, a residential community with 273 apartments.

Elevate 114 repurposed the original 100-year-old Methodist Church building for a portion of its common areas.

“The original church building had not been occupied or heated for some time, so the finishes and structure were in robust condition, but the bones were beautiful,” Adams said.

“The original stained glass windows and doors were mostly intact, and the inner dome structure was in good condition to be repaired. The original chandelier was physically there, although it required a lot of work to get it working as intended again.”

One of the challenges of the project was the stained glass windows.

“The stained glass windows were a focus and countless hours were spent restoring some of the translucent white interior glass and replacing it with clear glass so we could bring light into the building,” Adams said.

“We also had to remodel the ground floor as it sloped for gathering and remodel the second floor gallery to suit modern fire codes. Achieving all of this without people realizing that a major change was being made has been our constant focus.”

Adams said the company had the building’s original plans.

“So we thought we knew how the building was going to be framed,” he said. “Let’s just say they took the plans more as a suggestion, so we spent a lot of time with structural engineers revising our plans to fit current regulations and the structure we found.”

There were surprises.

“The ceiling of the upper floor is surrounded by plaster rosettes, in the middle of which a small sphere appears. When we first toured the property my partner thought the spheres were also painted plaster but turned out to be miniature lightbulbs from the 1920’s that were painted over.

“So we immediately turned around and figured out how to rewire all of those lights surrounding the base of the dome and repour the damaged floral decorative surrounds. It’s the first time in many, many years that the floral crown of lights will be lit again. We used reflector bulbs to highlight the plaster and it’s stunning.”

Comments are closed.