Church Real Estate – TAC Lawna http://tac-lawna.org/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 20:13:37 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://tac-lawna.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-11-150x150.png Church Real Estate – TAC Lawna http://tac-lawna.org/ 32 32 Jody Lee Black https://tac-lawna.org/jody-lee-black/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 20:13:37 +0000 https://tac-lawna.org/jody-lee-black/ Jody Lee (Elwood) Black was born on July 23, 1963 to Robert Neal and Norma Jean (Michals) Elwood in McCook, Nebraska and received her wings on June 20, 2022 at the age of 58. She grew up with her 6 siblings on a farm outside of Wilsonville, Nebraska spending most of her time outdoors riding […]]]>

Jody Lee (Elwood) Black was born on July 23, 1963 to Robert Neal and Norma Jean (Michals) Elwood in McCook, Nebraska and received her wings on June 20, 2022 at the age of 58.

She grew up with her 6 siblings on a farm outside of Wilsonville, Nebraska spending most of her time outdoors riding horses, seducing her sister Susan with cats, helping her mother and sisters raise chickens, and especially playing with the animals the German shepherd puppies that their mother would raise. She avoided chores as much as possible. In the summer, it was her and her younger brother Kyle’s job to fetch the dairy cows from the pasture every afternoon and bring them back across the creek to the pasture the next morning. She had many fond memories of growing up on the farm and had often said that she wished her children had been so lucky.

She attended the K-7. Class in Wilsonville and was baptized in the Christian Church of Wilsonville before transferring her membership to the United Methodist Church in Oberlin, where her family moved in 1976. Her faith was very important to her and gave her great comfort during the years dealing with kidney cancer. She competed in all sports and especially loved the shot put and discus on the track, where she held Decatur Community High School records for many years and earned two state medals before graduating from DCHS in 1981.

On February 21, 1982, Jody married the love of her life and high school sweetheart Kenny Black. They lived out their married life in Oberlin and were blessed with two amazing children, Chelsey and Jobey. Holidays were very important to her and she planned a family trip every summer. She and Kenny also spent weekends in their trailer at Red Willow Lake just north of McCook and have hosted many relatives and friends over the years, but the best memories are shared with their children and particularly their grandchildren Paisley, Taydem, Kreightyn and Nashlynn. They’ve had many fun weekends fishing, boating, skiing, tubing, walking, and making s’mores.

Jody and Kenny loved fishing, and their vacations away from the kids usually included a fishing trip in places like San Francisco Bay, the Pacific Ocean, and on Oregon’s Columbia River, where they caught giant sturgeons. Jody loved to travel and persuaded Kenny to go to the West Coast several times to her favorite destination, the Oregon Coast, and had also traveled to the East Coast to visit Cape Cod, New York City, Boston and Canada, accompanied by her Sister Char Who often traveled with them. She often invited her younger sister Sandi or one of her nieces to accompany her on vacation.

Kenny and Jody bred Labrador Retrievers for many years and she loved spending weekends at HRC Hunt Tests and was particularly proud when Kenny won his first championship. Paisley and Taydem went with them and decided they could do what grandpa did, needless to say she was a very proud grandma when they both earned their started titles for their puppies.

Jody had a career in banking that spanned 40 years. Beginning her senior year of high school, she began as a teller/accountant and later a consumer loan clerk for Farmers National Bank in Oberlin, where she worked through sales. She and colleague/friend Mick Glaze successfully convinced Atwood banker Barney Horton to set up a branch of Farmer Bank & Trust in Oberlin, which she ran as Branch Manager and COO for 18 years before deciding she needed a new challenge and started as a Residential Real-Estate Lender at MNB Bank in McCook, where she was working at the time of her death. She cherished the friendships she had made while working at these institutions and has remained close to many colleagues over the years. Jody loved decorating and arranging flowers and loved sharing her talent with others, especially her family and friends. She was a very reclusive person and her longtime best friend Jane Gilliam finally gave up after many unsuccessful attempts to get her to join social clubs.

Jody is survived by husband Kenny Black, Oberlin, daughter Chelsey and Leigh Zodrow, Arapahoe, NE, son Jobey and Kylee Black, Phillipsburg, KS, grandchildren, Paisley, Taydem and Kreightyn Zodrow and Nashlynn Black. Siblings, Charlene Springer, Lebanon, NE, Mike (Jacque) Elwood Hickman, NE, Danny Elwood, Oberlin, KS, Susan Wilson, Omaha, NE, Kyle (Jill) Elwood, Salina, KS, and Sandi (Monty) McLain, Perryton, Send. In-laws, Sharon Black, sisters-in-law, Jean (Byron) Hale and Carla (David) Depperschmidt, all from Oberlin, KS, as well as many nieces, nephews, cousins ​​and other relatives and friends.

She was preceded in death by her parents, Neal and Norma Elwood, grandparents, Henry and Grace Michals, Tom and Florence Elwood, and brother-in-law Lyle Springer, father-in-law Lyman Black.

Funeral services will be held at 10:00 am on June 23, 2022 at the United Methodist Church of Oberlin. The viewing will take place at Paul’s Funeral Home on 22 June 2022 from 1pm to 7pm, with the family welcoming guests from 5pm to 7pm. Burial will take place in Oberlin Cemetery. Memorial donations can be made to the United Methodist Church of Oberlin. Condolences can be left at www.paulsfh.com.

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Detroit World Outreach Church for sale after missing payment after bankruptcy https://tac-lawna.org/detroit-world-outreach-church-for-sale-after-missing-payment-after-bankruptcy/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 16:55:26 +0000 https://tac-lawna.org/detroit-world-outreach-church-for-sale-after-missing-payment-after-bankruptcy/ Its magnitude can be a blessing or a curse, Skubik said. “It has a lot of advantages because of its size, but you also need a community of at least 1,000, but more likely 1,500 to 2,000 people to be able to afford to operate and use the building as it is of scale and […]]]>

Its magnitude can be a blessing or a curse, Skubik said.

“It has a lot of advantages because of its size, but you also need a community of at least 1,000, but more likely 1,500 to 2,000 people to be able to afford to operate and use the building as it is of scale and it there’s only a limited number of churches that have congregations that big, or Islamic organizations, or whatever beliefs,” Skubik said, noting that the buildings are turnkey.

“The property has been valued at over $7 million. It could be purchased with all audio visual facilities.”

2017, The Detroit News reported that internal strife plagued the church following the death of its leader, Bishop Benjamin Gilbert, on February 28, 2017. Gilbert’s widow, Charisse, laid claim to the church — which the Detroit News described as leaders who “believe wealth is God’s reward” — and its assets.

According to the 2017 report, church leaders tried to block this and prevent them from collecting Benjamin Gilbert’s $2 million life insurance policy. In May 2017, The police took Charisse Gilbert away from the church for trespassing.

“The dispute is about control and the future of the church, although money and power are always in the background,” Marvin Wilder, vice president and treasurer of the church, told the Detroit News.

The church is now led by CJ Andre and his wife, Pastor Danielle Andre. He said he assumed his current role in January 2019 and the fight for the church ended in court in 2017.

Religious institutions have struggled with declining membership in recent years, prompting some to sell their properties and seek other creative uses.

CJ Andre said Detroit World Outreach will be relocating to a slightly smaller nearby facility along the Telegraph Road corridor within six miles of its current location. The church has about 1,350 members who attend both in person and online, CJ Andre said.

“The church is full of vision, full of power and we are moving forward and continuing what we have always done and we will not stop,” he said. “A church is a group of individuals, it is not brick and mortar. It’s not a building. We will continue with the same passion we currently have and our media programs will continue unhindered. We foresee a seamless transition.”

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KR Architecture & Interiors Oversees Design of New Calvary Light Church, Abington; Former real estate agency that becomes a worship center https://tac-lawna.org/kr-architecture-former-real-estate-agency-that-becomes-a-worship-center/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 12:44:47 +0000 https://tac-lawna.org/kr-architecture-former-real-estate-agency-that-becomes-a-worship-center/ Previous story: Barbecue Nation launches Mango Mania Food Festival Next story: 4 insurtech startups disrupting the insurance industry KR Architecture & Interiors Oversees Design of New Calvary Light Church, Abington; Former real estate agency that becomes a worship center Published on June 14, 2022 KR Architecture & Interiors, an Abington, MA based architecture firm, served […]]]>
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KR Architecture & Interiors Oversees Design of New Calvary Light Church, Abington; Former real estate agency that becomes a worship center

Published on June 14, 2022

KR Architecture & Interiors, an Abington, MA based architecture firm, served as the architectural firm for the design of the Calvary Light Church currently under construction at 204 Brockton Avenue, Abington.

The 1,560-square-foot, one-story building formerly served as a real estate office. Led by architect Krista Manna, owner of KR Architecture & Interiors, the church sought a change of use from a shop to a “meeting room,” which required the addition of a few additional Americans With Disability Act (ADA) exits and three additional bathrooms. The design also includes a new welcome center.

According to Manna, construction will take around two months. “There were some interesting design challenges because the building wasn’t originally conceived as a church,” she said. Other features include opening up the space, adding a small platform for the pastor and other speakers, dedicated seating for a congregation, and an AV booth for lighting control.

She added: “It’s always gratifying to help a client convert a building for a new use and to see that the community agrees to that new use as well. It has been a pleasure to work with Calvary Light Church and we welcome them to Abington.”

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Mixed results as South Dakota’s Noem interferes in GOP racing https://tac-lawna.org/mixed-results-as-south-dakotas-noem-interferes-in-gop-racing/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 12:26:23 +0000 https://tac-lawna.org/mixed-results-as-south-dakotas-noem-interferes-in-gop-racing/ SIOUX FALLS, SD (AP) — In the run-up to a possible presidential nomination, South Dakota Gov. Kristi Noem won the Republican nomination for a second term last week. Many of the nominees she hoped to vote for the Statehouse, however, did not have such a good night. She had hoped to replace contrarians with personal […]]]>

SIOUX FALLS, SD (AP) — In the run-up to a possible presidential nomination, South Dakota Gov. Kristi Noem won the Republican nomination for a second term last week. Many of the nominees she hoped to vote for the Statehouse, however, did not have such a good night.

She had hoped to replace contrarians with personal allies in the Republican-controlled legislature that has consistently defied her wishes, so the governor sided with about a dozen candidates challenging incumbents. Two-thirds lost by Noem’s favorites.

The backlash was a reminder that while endorsements often attract attention and financial resources, they don’t always translate into voter support. It’s a lesson that Donald Trump, Noem’s ally, is learning as he fails, particularly in Georgia, when he tries to punish Republicans who have ripped him off. In last month’s GOP primary, Georgia voters overwhelmingly backed Gov. Brian Kemp, who dismissed Trump’s lies about widespread fraud during the 2020 election.

Trump has been trying to shrug off his initial losses, but it’s unclear whether Noem can advance that easily. Some incumbents who have survived their efforts to defeat them wonder why a governor they support and generally agree with went to so much to try to oust them.

“There was a belief system that the party was a family – you don’t fight other members,” said State Senator Al Novstrup, a longtime lawmaker who consistently scores high on conservative organizations’ scorecards. “Obviously that concept has broken dramatically in this elementary school.”

Noem went into the primary with a somewhat strained relationship with Republican lawmakers. The results of the vote could only exacerbate the tension. Those weak ties to the Legislature could raise further questions about her ability to bid competitively for the Republican presidential nomination as multiple contendersincluding Trump, are taking steps to announce campaigns later this year.

She spent most of her first term crafting a vision of South Dakota as an example of conservative politics, and tapped into activist zeal in a game widely considered part of the White House conversation. But she also softened her proposals with deference to state government operations and the business community.

This has fueled conflict with some House Republicans in the Legislature over proposals for transgender children, exemptions from COVID-19 vaccine requirements and tax cuts. Despite her party holding 90% of the parliamentary seats, Noem’s agenda that year failed. House lawmakers paralyzed her proposals, often brushing aside her input.

They even openly criticized her.

A third of the Republican faction in the House of Representatives voted in favor of an unsuccessful attempt at public scolding Noem for taking on a hands-on role with a government agency while they reviewed her daughter’s application for a real estate appraiser’s license.

Among them was Republican Rep. Fred Deutsch, who has mostly supported the governor but said he voted based on his conscience. He had also previously parsed with Noem: his proposal in 2020 to ban puberty blockers and gender confirmation procedures for transgender children under the age of 16 was rejected in the Senate after Noem expressed reservations about the proposal.

As the April primary rolled around, the governor publicly criticized Deutsch and backed a candidate she could trust — her childhood babysitter, Stephanie Sauder.

But Noem’s wishes in the primary race were only partially met in the contest, which saw two House candidates emerge from a field of four Republicans. Sauder received the most votes, but Deutsch beat the other two candidates for the Republican nomination.

Noem got a goodbye from one of their most vocal Republican critics, House Speaker Spencer Gosch, when he challenged a state senator for the GOP nomination for that chamber. She also gained several other allies in the legislature, including a former chief of staff.

Her decision to run in the primary did not go unnoticed by grassroots groups fueling the current split in the state GOP. Noem received backlash from conservative media after a newspaper reported that she was working with state senator Lee Schoenbeck, the president pro tempore, to rid the statehouse of certain conservatives.

Sensing trouble, Noem sought to minimize the damage and maintain her ties with the Conservatives. The effort included a private meeting at a church in Sioux Falls in mid-May with a group called the Patriot Ripple Effect.

Noem seemed eager to convince the dozens of people who filled a church conference room that she was like-minded. She pointed to her decision during the COVID-19 pandemic to waive nationwide lockdowns and mask requirements, despite many criticisms and objections. She also clapped back at Republican lawmakers, who were pushing for sweeping exemptions from vaccines and advocating a hands-off approach to government that extends to both companies and individuals.

“They blew me up and said I wasn’t conservative because I wouldn’t come in and tell Sanford (the state’s largest hospital system) and big corporations they couldn’t require vaccines for their employees,” she said. “My response to them was, ‘They’re telling me as a government to tell them as a private company what to do.'”

Her claims drew some applause. But her questions mostly challenged Noem and poked at her record throughout the 45-minute meeting. They wanted to know why she would reliably target conservative lawmakers?

“My babysitter is running for office. I kinda like her,” she replied.

The group continued to press the issue, with a member pointing to Noem’s testimony backing a challenger to state senator Novstrup. Noem’s response suggested that her support for Rachel Dix stemmed from a personal connection rather than political ideology: “She’s a friend of mine and has been for years.”

As the first results began to crystallize, it became clear that internal party conflict is not going away.

Rep. Tom Pischke, who belongs to the conservative wing of the party and is beating Noem’s election for a Senate seat, said he got a boost after being targeted by Noem’s allies. A letter was even circulated among voters noting that Noem’s preferred candidate, Lisa Rave, was married to the chief lobbyist for the state’s hospital systems – a favorite target of certain Conservatives during the pandemic.

“That was the nail in the coffin for her,” says Pischke about the effect of the letter on his rival.

He added that the fallout from the race may even have extended to the governor’s standing among ardent conservatives: “It actually did damage to governor Noem a little bit,” he said.

___

For full coverage of the midterms, follow AP at https://apnews.com/hub/2022-midterm-elections and on Twitter, https://twitter.com/ap_politics

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Wood County Real Estate Transfers | News, Sports, Jobs https://tac-lawna.org/wood-county-real-estate-transfers-news-sports-jobs/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 04:14:08 +0000 https://tac-lawna.org/wood-county-real-estate-transfers-news-sports-jobs/ PARKERSBURG – The following Wood County properties were transferred between May 1 and May 20 * James J. Cirigliano III & Jane E. Cirigliano to Braden M. Johnson & Katelyn M. Bond, Lot 78 North Hills Estates, North Hills District, $278,500. * Ryan S. Stanley to Amber L. Cool, Lot 207 Brierwood, Williams […]]]>

PARKERSBURG – The following Wood County properties were transferred between May 1 and May 20

* James J. Cirigliano III & Jane E. Cirigliano to Braden M. Johnson & Katelyn M. Bond, Lot 78 North Hills Estates, North Hills District, $278,500.

* Ryan S. Stanley to Amber L. Cool, Lot 207 Brierwood, Williams District, $87,500.

* Areitco Investments LLC to Prince Rentals LLC, Lot 21 Gordon and Ebert Addition, Parkersburg City District, $41,000.

* Deidre L. Marshall to Barbara S. Ream, Section lots 59 & 60 subdivision Albert Congdon Estate, Parkersburg City District, $115,000.

* Jae Rhys Investments LLC to Jason L. Goff, tract 0.270 acres Dupont Road, Lübeck District, $2,000.

* Prosser Land and Timber LLC to Robert C. and Denise M. Pendelebury, Block 79 3/4 acres & Block 2 acres & Block 100 acres, Union District, $256,500.

* Steven L. McClain & Kristin R. Patterson aka Kristin R. Lewis to Steven L. McClain, Lot 3 Lubeck Hills Addition Section E, Lübeck District, $75,000.

* Linda E. Kantiz to Kaisie E. Saunders, Lot 156 Pleasant View Addition, District of Vienna, $123,500.

* Randall B. and Stacy M. Smith to James N. and Christina K. Spychalski, 1,106-acre St. Mary’s Pike acreage and Oil, Gas and Minerals, if any, Parkersburg County, $173,000

* Community Resources Inc. to Joshua E. Freeland, 0.186 acre Nash St. property with exposure, Parkersburg City District, $133,000.

* Stephanie K. Roeckner to Melissa L. Talbott, Lot 20 Riverview Supplement, Vienna District, $120,000.

* Prosser Land and Timber LLC to Timothy A. and Brenda L. Miller, Area 2 tract 36 114/160 acres & tract 178 acres exemptions & tract 47 1/5 acres & tract 1 only, Union District, $225,000

* Cynthia J. Jackson and Marcy J. Vanhemel to Robert W. and Catherine L. Nichols, tract 0.976 acres, Clay District, $75,000.

* Tera M. Cutright, formerly Tera M. Phillips, to Michael and Tina Liyyon, Lot 2 ADA C Nugent Lots, Lübeck District, $63,000

* Robert L. Byers and Nola J. Byers (indirect) to Orville and Carol Trembly, Lots 4 and 5, Amended Plat Oakland Addition, Parkersburg City District, $250,000.

* Jason Johnson, Successor, Executor and Trustee of Michael W. Johnson’s Estate of Raphael and Barbara Vargas, Block 5 Acres, Butcher Bend Road, Slate District, $140,000.

* Clyde G. Way to Christopher L. and Aimee R. Boldman, Lot 52 JW Dils Heirs Addendum #2 and all interests in oil, gas and mineral rights, if any, Parkersburg City District, $142,000.

* J. David Arnorld to Pit Computers Inc., 0.18 acre lot, West Virginia Route #2 & Parkwood Drive, Parkersburg City County, $350,000

* New Hope Baptist Church, Helen H. Youngblood (indirect), Robert K. Youngblood (indirect), Scott Newell (trustees), David L. Youngblood, Stephen R. Youngblood to Joel and Bernice Reuter, Lot 41 Woodland Park Addition, Parkersburg District, $8,000.

* Michael J. and Pamela R. Higgs to Lisa Higgs, Lot 17 & Section Lot 16 Block 4 Dudley’s second extension, Parkersburg City District, $80,000.

* C-Card Properties LLC to Hannah D. Kelly, Jonathan L. Merinar and Raymond E. Kelley, Lot 212 Fairgrounds Park Addition, Parkersburg City District, $142,500.

* Paul P. Cheng to Kathrine K. Hartley, Lot 54 Brookside Addition, Parkersburg City District, $140,000.

* Timothy N. and Vicki R. Chaney to Keith and April Penn, Lot 7, Block 1, New Dominion, Parkersburg City Borough, $27,500.

* Kristi L. and Gene A. Hendrickson II to Robert J. and Beth M. Wade, Lot 8 Vic-Mar Manor Addition, Williamstown District, $120,000.

* Phyllis E. and John H. Johnson Jr. to Mathew L. Allen, Lot 11 Randolph Addition minus exception, Parkersburg City District, $100,000.

* Daniel and Cienna N. Vandyke to Joseph S. Chen, Lot 90 Greenmont Hills Additionphase 6, District of Vienna, $500,000.

* Stephen C. Smith to Daniel S. and Julia A. Gliden, tract 2.0 acres, US Rt 50 and right of way, $100,000.

* Yuhsiu and Atty Fang Lin to Robert L. Sample, Lot 10, Section 2, River Road Subdivision, District of Vienna, $195,000.

* Terry Lee Layfield to Shari Lynn Flinn, Los 10 Paradise Village #1, Lübeck District, $65,000.

* Timothy A. and Jenny E. Byers to Jonathan D. Bechtold, all rental property 18 Society Hill Acres Addition, Slate District, $600,000.

* Kimberly Lee Hill and Judy Anne Dix (indirect) to Christopher M. and Christina M. Davis, tract 0.6629 acres Davisville Road less right of way, Clay District, $200,000.

* Seneca Trustees Inc. and Fred A. and Linda Lutz (indirectly) to Steven K. McClain, Lot 84 Roselawn Addition, District of Vienna, $57,000.

* Terry M. Topping and Margaret Rose Topping (indirect) to Jamie L. and Clarence B. White Jr., Lot 48 Willowbrook Acres Inc, Parkersburg City District, $265,000.

* JSMN Dollar General Properties LLC to Namdar DG Realty LLC, Lot Burke and 7th Streets, Parkersburg City District, $609,006.21.

* Clerk of Wood County Commission Mark Rhodes, Kelsie Gabbett (indirect), Ludwig M. Squires (indirect) and Goldie Squires (indirect) to Kelsie J. Gabbart, Tygart Creek 26 Acres, Steele District, $2,100.

* Union Creek LLC to BK Properties LLC of Vienna Lot 8 Orchard Park Amendment & Lot 17 G W. Wentz Amendment No. 1 & Lots 48, 50, 52, 54, 56 & 58 L. Dudley, District of Vienna, 2,200. 000$.




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Brooklyn News: Flatbush Church is getting a new life as a creative hub https://tac-lawna.org/brooklyn-news-flatbush-church-is-getting-a-new-life-as-a-creative-hub/ Sat, 04 Jun 2022 17:30:53 +0000 https://tac-lawna.org/brooklyn-news-flatbush-church-is-getting-a-new-life-as-a-creative-hub/ A developer and artist duo is building creative hubs in Brooklyn. Next is a Flatbush Church They seem like odd bedfellows: one is a young creative determined to build affordable spaces for artists, the other a real estate developer with a string of apartment buildings across Brooklyn. But Audrey Banks and Joseph Banda have formed […]]]>

A developer and artist duo is building creative hubs in Brooklyn. Next is a Flatbush Church

They seem like odd bedfellows: one is a young creative determined to build affordable spaces for artists, the other a real estate developer with a string of apartment buildings across Brooklyn.

But Audrey Banks and Joseph Banda have formed a somewhat fortuitous partnership that is thriving in adaptive reuse: transforming historic buildings into affordable living and working spaces for artists and activists.

This month’s page. Photo by Susan DeVries

Long-tainted, reimagined Batcave prepares to debut as the Gowanus Arts Center

The scaffolding is down, the new windows are in, the addition is complete and the bricks are bare. It’s almost time for Powerhouse Arts to take over its new location in the famous Gowanus Batcave.


Interior of 607 5th Street

Park Slope Limestone near Prospect Park with plastering work, Mantels asking for $3.45 million

This early 20th-century Park Slope limestone property has been in the same family for decades and has a wealth of well-preserved original features, windows on three sides and a prime location just a short walk from Prospect Park. Designed by prolific architect Axel Hedman, 607 5th Street boasts original mantels, paneling, fretwork, marble sinks, and plasterwork.

Views of Gowanus Green and surrounding area

The site in 2020. Photo by Susan De Vries

Unexpected pile driving at construction site along Gowanus Canal has officials searching for answers

A group of elected officials are sounding the alarm about potentially dangerous construction work on a toxic brownfield site next to the Gowanus Canal.

Exterior view of 33 Broad Street in Kinderhook

Restore an 18th-century Dutch historian’s jewel in Kinderhook, Yours for $390,000

True lovers of old homes will be able to look at the listing photos for this 18th century Kinderhook apartment and see the big bones of the house and the charm of the grounds, even with its once magnificent landscaping becoming a bit overgrown.

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Still no verdict for Union Church Road Subdivision | news https://tac-lawna.org/still-no-verdict-for-union-church-road-subdivision-news/ Fri, 03 Jun 2022 04:02:00 +0000 https://tac-lawna.org/still-no-verdict-for-union-church-road-subdivision-news/ country United States of AmericaUS Virgin IslandsMinor Outlying Islands of the United StatesCanadaMexico, United Mexican StatesBahamas, Commonwealth of theCuba, RepublicDominican RepublicHaiti, RepublicJamaicaAfghanistanAlbania, People’s Socialist RepublicAlgeria, People’s Democratic RepublicAmerican SamoaAndorra, PrincipalityAngola, RepublicanguillaAntarctica (the area south of 60° S)Antigua and BarbudaArgentina, Argentine RepublicArmeniaArubaAustralia, Commonwealth ofAustria, RepublicAzerbaijan, RepublicBahrain, KingdomBangladesh, People’s RepublicBarbadosBelarusBelgium, Kingdom ofBelizeBenin, People’s RepublicBermudasBhutan, KingdomBolivia, RepublicBosnia and […]]]>

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Faith & Footprints: St. James Episcopal Church – Grosse Ile Township, Michigan https://tac-lawna.org/faith-footprints-st-james-episcopal-church-grosse-ile-township-michigan/ Wed, 01 Jun 2022 20:19:26 +0000 https://tac-lawna.org/faith-footprints-st-james-episcopal-church-grosse-ile-township-michigan/ St. James Episcopal Church in Grosse Ile Township, Michigan was the dream of Lisette Denison Forth, a former slave who became the first black woman to own land in Michigan. She was born in 1786, 10 years after America declared independence. She was born into slavery near Detroit. Forth’s parents, Peter and Hannah Denison, were […]]]>

St. James Episcopal Church in Grosse Ile Township, Michigan was the dream of Lisette Denison Forth, a former slave who became the first black woman to own land in Michigan. She was born in 1786, 10 years after America declared independence. She was born into slavery near Detroit.

Forth’s parents, Peter and Hannah Denison, were freed slaves working for a Detroit attorney. Peter and Hannah sued for their children’s freedom under the Northwest Ordinance, but the court dismissed their case. In another case, the court ruled that Michigan had no obligation to take escaped slaves from Canada and return them, so Forth crossed the Detroit River to freedom.

She returned in 1815 and found work as a domestic servant, saving her income and investing in real estate. She saved so much money that 10 years later she was able to buy four plots of land in Grosse Ile.

Forth’s dream was to build a church on the land. This request was set out in a will in January 1860, more than a year before the start of the American Civil War. Since she could not read, the contract had to be read to her.

When Forth died, she left a portion of her estate to her family, and an additional $3,000 was to be used to build a church. Their sons hired architect Gordon W. Lloyd to design the structure. Her eldest son also built an altar cross, a kneeler and a reading stand for the pastor. Construction began in 1867 and was completed in 1868.

The enchanting Carpenter Gothic church is adorned by a large Tiffany stained glass window and two carved red wooden doors dedicated to her. A larger church was built on the site in 1958 and the 1867 building serves as a chapel for the new church.

In the 154 years since its construction, the church has undergone numerous repairs and additions, but the main structure remains essentially original and in excellent condition. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places and was designated a Michigan State Historic Site in 1971.

The church is part of an active Christian community and members pray every Sunday. For more information visit www.saintjamesgi.net.

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The inland port’s efforts to seize Latter-day Saint property throws a blow to the plan to improve air travel and transportation https://tac-lawna.org/the-inland-ports-efforts-to-seize-latter-day-saint-property-throws-a-blow-to-the-plan-to-improve-air-travel-and-transportation/ Mon, 30 May 2022 12:00:43 +0000 https://tac-lawna.org/the-inland-ports-efforts-to-seize-latter-day-saint-property-throws-a-blow-to-the-plan-to-improve-air-travel-and-transportation/ Significant ownership claims on Church property within the Inner Harbor have derailed plans to improve the quality of life for residents of Salt Lake City’s west side. The board of directors of the Utah Inland Port Authority voted on May 19 to acquire — either by purchase or deed — 41 acres owned by Suburban […]]]>

Significant ownership claims on Church property within the Inner Harbor have derailed plans to improve the quality of life for residents of Salt Lake City’s west side.

The board of directors of the Utah Inland Port Authority voted on May 19 to acquire — either by purchase or deed — 41 acres owned by Suburban Land Reserve, a real estate arm of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. The vacant lot is nestled between Interstate 80 and a railroad line at approximately 6 South and 5600 West.

Port officials insisted swift action was needed to preserve the land and public funding opportunities.

It turns out that years ago, the Utah Department of Transportation, in partnership with a small Utah railroad company, had secured federal funding for the site to improve traffic, air quality and noise pollution around Poplar Grove in the Salt Lake City neighborhood.

Just days after the Port Authority approved an order to acquire the property, Salt Lake Garfield and Western Railway (SLGW) filed its own significant domain lawsuit in 3rd District Court on May 24.

“This country is critical,” said John Fenton, CEO of Patriot Railof SLGW’s parent company to “do exactly what we want to achieve.”

Founded in 1891, SLGW provides short-haul service in Salt Lake City and carries freight to and from major railroads, including Union Pacific and BNSF. Patriot acquired SLGW in January 2021.

How Westsiders would benefit

As the company’s rail service has grown, particularly over the past decade, it has been a headache for people living west of the city. From 2016 to 2017 alone, the number of SLGW wagons grew from 3,775 to 6,000 wagons, leading to traffic jams along intersecting roads as trains are set up along the rail lines.

in the grant applications SLGW and UDOT pleaded with the US Department of Transportation for a project that they call “Western Interchange”. This proposal would move the majority of SLGW’s operations to the Suburban Land Reserve lots and away from the company’s current marshalling yard at Poplar Grove.

Notably, the project would also reduce up to 90% of traffic congestion at the 800 West, 900 West, and 1000 West level crossings, as well as six other downtown intersections.

“When this railroad was built in the 1890s,” Fenton said, “this intersection didn’t even exist.”

Less rail traffic at these crossings, which are now in residential areas, also improves safety, helps with night-time noise and dampens emissions from idling vehicles waiting for trains to pass. after submissions to the federal government.

Federal authorities approved UDOT and SLGW’s application in 2018, granting $13.6 million Infrastructure for America’s Reconstruction Funds for the Western Interchange project. SLGW pledged an additional $9.1 million.

The railroad company also began negotiations to purchase the Suburban Land Reserve properties around this time, court filings show.

SLGW offered $5.4 million in cash last July, according to letters sent to representatives of the church’s real estate holdings. The rail company then increased its bid to $6 million in March.

On April 8, SLGW apparently received notification that the church instead intended to solicit bids for the property – at which time SLGW indicated that it had the right to seek significant domain.

A month later, the railroad repeated its $6 million offer. On May 13, it announced an appraisal Valuing the site at $3.7 million with “reasonable access” and $2.2 million without access (the property is bounded by the freeway to the north and the rail line to the south) to demonstrate that its submission beats market prices.

Suburban Land Reserve officials declined to comment on the story, but previously told The Salt Lake Tribune that after “a competitive marketing process, the Utah Inland Port Authority was the winning bidder from among several interested parties submitting bids on the land.” made”.

Questions remain about the Port Authority’s move

It’s unclear why the Port Authority interfered with SLGW’s purchase plans or how much they offered to compensate the church for the acreage.

In an interview last week, Port Authority executive director Jack Hedge said after Suburban Land Reserve opened the property up for bidding, other buyers were willing to pay more than SLGW and its parent company Patriot Rail.

“Because we have a public purpose,” Hedge said, “we may play closer to the market than Patriot appears willing or able to pay.”

Several Utah public figures and government officials Letters of support issued of the Western Interchange project by UDOT and SLGW in 2017, including then Gov. Gary Herbert, the Salt Lake Chamber, the Utah Transit Authority and the Wasatch Front Regional Council.

However, Hedge said he “was not aware” that SLGW had an interest in the Suburban Land Reserve property when the Port Authority decided to make a bid.

(Francisco Kjolseth | The Salt Lake Tribune) Shipping containers are moved by rail car at Union Pacific’s intermodal terminal west of Salt Lake City. The future location of the handling facility, which will be the heart of the inland port, is directly to the south, as can be seen on Wednesday, November 10, 2021.

“To be honest, our interests and Patriot’s are perfectly aligned,” Hedge said.

Port Authority officials declined to comment after SLGW filed its significant domain complaint on May 24.

The Port Authority last year secured an opportunity to issue up to $150 million worth of bonds, which it would repay with some of the property taxes it collected. A lawsuit currently being considered by the Supreme Court questions whether the Port Authority is even entitled to these revenues.

When asked why the Port Authority is not pursuing significant territory or attempting to acquire the land under the proposed $53 million transshipment facility in the heart of the Inner Harbor, Hedge replied, “We have not felt any urgency or need or concern for the property could be used for other purposes.”

Fenton, CEO of Patriot Rail, said the Port Authority’s efforts to take over the Suburban Land Reserve property could “potentially” jeopardize SLGW’s federal grant. A spokesman for UDOT said the department’s role was simply to “facilitate” the grant and could not say if SLGW’s loss of interest would have any impact on the fate of those funds.

“We want to continue. That’s what we want to do. We want to be good partners,” said Fenton. “There were many different agencies that worked together to bring this grant together and make this grant a reality. Hopefully we can move on and do what’s right for everyone involved.”

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Country Club Plaza is 100 years old. Explore the history behind the most famous buildings | KCUR 89.3 https://tac-lawna.org/country-club-plaza-is-100-years-old-explore-the-history-behind-the-most-famous-buildings-kcur-89-3/ Sat, 28 May 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://tac-lawna.org/country-club-plaza-is-100-years-old-explore-the-history-behind-the-most-famous-buildings-kcur-89-3/ This story was first published in KCUR’s Creative Adventure Newsletter. You can Sign up to get stories like this in your inbox every Tuesday. Country Club Plaza celebrated its 100th anniversary last month, and included in this milestone is 100 years of architecture, celebrations, and even a strange history. KCUR’s podcast, A People’s History of […]]]>

This story was first published in KCUR’s Creative Adventure Newsletter. You can Sign up to get stories like this in your inbox every Tuesday.

Country Club Plaza celebrated its 100th anniversary last month, and included in this milestone is 100 years of architecture, celebrations, and even a strange history. KCUR’s podcast, A People’s History of Kansas City, recently commemorated the occasion by exploring the famous borough’s complicated legacy.

When JC Nichols developed his plan for the Plaza in the early 1920s, he envisioned more than just a mall. “Nichol’s vision for a larger shopping destination culminated in a plan to convert this swamp property along Brush Creek,” host Suzanne Hogan describes on the episode.

Nichols’ complicated legacy of racist real estate practices led to the renaming of the fountain and avenue that bore his name. Despite this history, Nichols’ original vision for the plaza remains, as many see it as a tourist destination or a place for family gatherings.

The Plaza’s unique Spanish-style architecture remains a draw for locals and tourists alike. The plaza has changed tremendously over the last century, but there are a number of architectural gems that date back to the neighborhood’s founding. Others have been built in the decades since.

Learn about the history of these places you may have passed dozens of times without knowing their meaning.

Mill Creek Building

Missouri State Historical Society

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The Mill Creek Building at 4646 Mill Creek Parkway was the first example of the Plaza’s notable Spanish-style architecture.

opened in 1923, the Mill Creek Building was JC Nichols’ first commercial building on the Country Club Plaza. It still stands at 4646 Mill Creek Parkway, across from the fountain in Mill Creek Park.

The building was originally named the Suydam building after its original occupants: Suydam Incorporateda supplier of high-quality “art objects” and furnishings.

It was the first example of the Plaza’s remarkable Spanish-style architecture, a marked departure from traditional local conventions. “Historically, Kansas City builders feared color, for example in the sense that it was used in California,” according to a 1923 article in the Kansas City Star.

The same article applauding architect Edward Buehler Delk’s design noted that “the business structure has won unqualified praise from architects.”

The building has hosted a number of tenants over the years and now houses the locally owned restaurant Rye Plaza.

Nelle Peters district

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Eric Bowers

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Eric Bowers Photo Blog

In 2016, three of Peters’ Tudor-style apartment buildings on Block 4700 of Summit Street were demolished.

Another notable segment of Plaza architecture has less to do with Spanish influence and more to do with the important woman behind the buildings.

It is believed to have been designed by famed Kansas City architect Nelle Peters approximately 1,000 buildings in the Kansas City area. This makes her, according to Jason Roe of the Kansas City Public Library, “one of the most prolific architects in Kansas City in the 1920s”.

Peters accomplished this amazing feat at a time when female architects were rare and developed her own style. “She was the local pioneer of sit-down apartments around a central courtyard,” describes Jill Canon in a 1995 Kansas City Star article.

The Nelle E. Peters themed neighborhood at West Plaza was designated in 1989. It consists of six residences named after literary and artistic figures including Mark Twain, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow and Paul Cézanne. Peters designed these buildings in 1928 and 1929.

The Cezanne pictured above is located at 712 W. 48th Street. The Peters themed district is located at 48th Street with buildings at Jefferson Street, Roanoke Parkway and Ward Parkway.

In 2016, three of Peters’ Tudor-style apartment buildings on Block 4700 of Summit Street were demolished. While many campaigned to preserve the landmarks, the Kansas City Council voted against a proposal to give the buildings historic preservation status.

Seventh Scientist of the Church of Christ

Seventh-Church-of-Christ-Scientist.jpg

Kevin Collison

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CityScene KC

If you want to see the church, you may need to act quickly as the building’s future is in the balance. Developers want to tear it down and replace it with a nine-story building that would house restaurants and luxury apartments.

This is high on the hill at the northwest corner of 47th and Pennsylvania Avenue Seventh Church of Christ, Scientistopened in 1942. According to Kevin Collison, the church is “regarded as one of the finest examples of Romanesque architecture in the city”.

The church was designed by Indianapolis architect G. Wilbur Foster to “harmonize with the Spanish architecture of the Country Club Plaza neighborhood,” according to a 1941 Star article.

If you want to see the church, you may need to act quickly as the building’s future is in the balance. “Drake Development of Overland Park plans to demolish it and replace it with a nine-story building that will house restaurants, luxury condos and entertainment,” KCUR’s Jacob Martin reported in April 2022.

The group Historic Kansas City Foundation campaigns against the demolition of the historic church.

Country Club Plaza Theater Building

Country Club Plaza Theater Building

Missouri State Historical Society

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Kansas City Public Library Digital Archives

In 1928, workers building the Country Club Plaza Theater discovered a 2.5-pound mastodon tooth.

With its tower and ornate stonework is the old Country Club Plaza Theater Building on the southwest corner of 47th Street and Wyandotte Street is a sight in itself. The cinema was a major attraction in the Plaza’s early days, but the building also has much earlier historical connections.

During construction in 1928, workers discovered a 2.5-pound mastodon tooth.

The old Plaza Theater embodied the neighborhood’s Spanish theme, both inside and out. According to a 1928 Star article, it contained “two park stations treated in an entirely new way, with a low brick coping wall, old Spanish gates, fountains, shrubs and trees”.

The building had a long life as a theatre, operating until 1999 when the nearby competing (and now closed) Cinemark cinema moved to 526 Nichols Road. The theater was also home to the Kansas City Philharmonic in the 1960s.

Though the building is currently closed, signs suggest a store called KC Style Haus will open in late spring 2022.

Plaza Medical Building

Plaza Medical Building

Before the construction of the Plaza Medical Building, the land was once the site of the Plaza Dog Mart, “where people interested in buying a dog could see and inspect many breeds of dog,” according to the State Historical Society of Missouri-Kansas City.

Upon its completion in 1937, a Jack Henry advertisement excitedly called the Plaza Medical Building “the most beautiful structure in Kansas City.” The main entrance to the building is at 315 Nichols Road and is flanked by colorful murals. The second floor is decorated with a tower and tiles around the windows.

As the 1937 Star advertisement details, the building contains “brilliantly colored tiles from ancient Mexico…interesting plaques…antique iron balconies from Spain…soft, handcrafted tiles of bright colors.”

Prior to the construction of the Plaza Medical Building, the land was once the site of the Plaza Dog Market. On September 22, 1934, “Country Club Plaza dealers sponsored a dog fair where people interested in buying a dog could see and inspect many breeds of dogs,” according to the State Historical Society of Missouri-Kansas City.

Boy and Frog Fountain

Boy and Frog Fountain

You’ll find the quirky and lesser-known Boy and Frog fountain in front of Starbucks at 302 Nichols Road.

There are of course many statues and fountains to see in the plaza. Popular destinations include The Fountain of Neptune near 47th and Central Streets, the Ben Franklin Statue near 47th and Jefferson Streets and the Wild Boar of Florence near 47th and Wornall Road.

A small fountain to add to your list is just across from the Plaza Medical Building. That Boy and Frog Fountain Located directly in front of Starbucks at 302 Nichols Road. The statue was designed by Raffaello Romanelli in Florence and brought to Kansas City in 1929.

“Although it looks like the chubby kid is peeing happily in the frog’s mouth, the amphibian is actually spitting up the water.” funny describes the site atlas obscura. “There’s a grumpy-looking faun crouching beneath the boy and his frog friend [sic] riding a dolphin that doesn’t look too pleased that it’s stuck holding up the marble basin.”

Atlas Obscura also states that the fountain has recently been the subject of drama. It was reported that the frog went missing in February 2021 and that as of June 2021 “the frog is back, although missing its right front leg”.

This isn’t the first time the fountain has been involved in a theft. The baby was stolen in 1960 but luckily later found in nearby bushes, the star reported in 2016.

This compilation only scratches the surface. If you have time, Country Club Plaza has created several themes scavenger hunt. The William T. Kemper Foundation also put one together 36-page plaza tour with historical reflections on the district. It contains 50 notable landmarks in the district.

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