Church Properties – TAC Lawna http://tac-lawna.org/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 11:00:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://tac-lawna.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-11-150x150.png Church Properties – TAC Lawna http://tac-lawna.org/ 32 32 $50M Charleston condominium project with 21 units starting at $1.7M | property https://tac-lawna.org/50m-charleston-condominium-project-with-21-units-starting-at-1-7m-property/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 11:00:00 +0000 https://tac-lawna.org/50m-charleston-condominium-project-with-21-units-starting-at-1-7m-property/ A Baltimore developer will break ground on a $50 million luxury mixed-use residential project south of Charleston City Market later this year. Landmark Partners is expected to begin construction of City House Charleston, a 21-unit residential and commercial upscale gated community on Cumberland Street between Church and State Streets in the French Quarter, later this […]]]>

A Baltimore developer will break ground on a $50 million luxury mixed-use residential project south of Charleston City Market later this year.

Landmark Partners is expected to begin construction of City House Charleston, a 21-unit residential and commercial upscale gated community on Cumberland Street between Church and State Streets in the French Quarter, later this year.

“It’s going to be transformative for this space,” said developer Jon Pannoni of Landmark Partners.

The four-story project will feature two- to three-bedroom apartments ranging from 1,500 square feet to 3,000 square feet, each with an outdoor patio.

Prices start at $1.7 million and increase based on square footage, floor and finishes selected, Pannoni said.

According to Charleston County land registers, Landmark affiliates paid $13 million for the block-length property in two transactions in March.

The site includes a parking lot in State and Cumberland adjacent to The Loutrel Hotel and the Martschink Building, whose Cumberland facade is integrated into the project.


Charleston's long-planned Magnolia project tackles the Atlanta developer

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The proposed development also includes a vacant lot on Linguard Street adjacent to the four storey accommodation and the three storey brick building that will remain in Church and Cumberland with commercial space on the ground floor and office space on the top floor.

The site is also across from a Scotchman supermarket to be replaced by a 50-room boutique hotel, across State Street.

The 100,000-square-foot City House Charleston will include full-time staff and concierge services, a shared wellness center, a shared workspace and 69 covered parking spaces.

The fourth floor will include a 3,000 square foot clubhouse and pool. The pool is sunk behind a parapet for privacy, but offers views over the city’s rooftops. The clubhouse will also feature an outdoor kitchen and entertainment area.


3. Apartment project planned in Charleston on Meeting Street Road in the Upper Peninsula

Pannoni called the concept “a sophisticated, personalized living experience that blends seamlessly with Charleston’s graceful architecture and the celebrated charm of the surrounding French Quarter. … This location allows you to immerse yourself in a beautiful part of the city.”

The project’s name comes from Landmark’s Baltimore estate, an early 20th-century Greystone mansion originally called the City House, which has been converted into office and meeting space.

Charleston residential real estate company Carriage Properties will manage the condominium sales for the project, which is expected to be ready for occupancy in early 2024.

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Trumbull County Projects Earn $3.26 Million for Redevelopment | News, Sports, Jobs https://tac-lawna.org/trumbull-county-projects-earn-3-26-million-for-redevelopment-news-sports-jobs/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 05:31:20 +0000 https://tac-lawna.org/trumbull-county-projects-earn-3-26-million-for-redevelopment-news-sports-jobs/ Nine projects in the Mahoning Valley, including the former Niles General Electric Glass site and the Warren Gasification Plant, received more than $12.4 million in federal grants to redevelop brownfield sites that will aid economic development. The nine local projects were among 112 statewide to receive $192 million in grants through the Ohio […]]]>

Nine projects in the Mahoning Valley, including the former Niles General Electric Glass site and the Warren Gasification Plant, received more than $12.4 million in federal grants to redevelop brownfield sites that will aid economic development.

The nine local projects were among 112 statewide to receive $192 million in grants through the Ohio Brownfield Remediation Program, the Department of Development announced Friday.

The program is worth $350 million, with $60 million for 78 projects, including $3.4 million for the former St. Joseph Riverside Hospital in Warren, announced April 26.

Gov. Mike DeWine said Friday of the 112 projects: “These properties are vital spaces in our communities that are not only wasted in their current capacity, but often pose a threat to their local communities. Today we are reclaiming these spaces for the future of our residents, businesses and communities.”

The four Trumbull County projects, all awarded to the land bank, totaled $3,255,623 while five Mahoning County projects received a total of $9,187,610.

Former GE facility at Niles project to receive $1,726,807 in grants to clean up contaminated soil and groundwater.

Following the redevelopment, Cleveland Steel Container Corp. plans to move from its 412 Mason St. location to the former GE property.

A 69,000-square-foot building stands there and the company plans to construct another 120,000-square-foot building to begin operations, according to the governor’s office.

GE operated there from 1912, supplying molten glass for the manufacture of glass parts for light bulbs. The plant closed in 2008. At its peak, it employed 500 people.

All GE buildings have been demolished, with the existing 69,000 square foot building on the site being used for dry storage and operations for a contractor.

OTHER PROJECTS

The former gasification facility, owned by the City of Warren, will receive $1,173,434 for removal of contaminated soil and oils in groundwater and other remediation work to ensure compliance with Environmental Protection Agency regulations, according to the governor’s office.

The vacant lot has an industrial history dating back to the late 19th century and was an incinerator, ammonia well and stored coke and coal. Coal tar is present on property.

After the redevelopment, the site will be marketed for residential, commercial or industrial development.

The former Republican Steel office building at 999 Pine Ave. SE in Warren receives $55,382.

In the 1920s the property was used for a cleaning and dwellings. A gas station and body shop were later built, with all buildings demolished in the 1950s. The site was vacant until the late 1970s, when a Republic Steel office building was constructed there.

Once the refurbishment is complete, Megojoule Ventures, an energy storage investment company that is part of the BRITE Energy Innovators portfolio, will provide the space for net-zero energy research and development. Megojoule bought the building last year for $750,000.

The office building is adjacent to the former Republic Steel mill.

The 1,025 acres on the former steel mill site are being considered for redevelopment.

Of this area, 825 are considered prime industrial development areas and a transport corridor to Lordstown.

The land bank was awarded $300,000 Friday for an appraisal of the other 200 acres on the former plant site. This land lies west of the Mahoning River adjacent to the former ArcelorMittal Coke Plant now owned by Cleveland-Cliffs.

This lot is currently vacant and the remaining buildings are unsafe, according to the governor’s office. An assessment will be conducted on the property to determine if there is any contamination from the industrial history of the site.

The property offers access to State Route 45 and corridor industrial development, the Ohio Turnpike and Interstate 76, although an access road will likely be required.

The Western Reserve Port Authority owns the 200 acres and the 825. It runs along Pine Avenue SE, extends nearly two miles, and touches on Warren, Lordstown, Howland, Weathersfield and Warren Township.

Of the five Mahoning County projects funded Friday, three are in Youngstown and one each in Struthers and Sebring.

The largest award was $6,962,250 for 20 Federal Place in downtown Youngstown. The city plans to rehabilitate the building at a cost of up to $60 million.

The other two Youngstown projects cost $149,803 for 131 W. Woodland Ave., the former Potential Development School and a former Lutheran church and school, and $86,887 for 2307 Market St., a 101-year-old building that an ice cream shop used to be decades ago.

Redevelopment of the former Royal China Co. in Sebring received $1,492,670 and a five-acre redevelopment on a Struthers property that was once the site of Youngstown Sheet & Tube received $496,000.



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Rising valuations raise concerns https://tac-lawna.org/rising-valuations-raise-concerns/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 14:14:53 +0000 https://tac-lawna.org/rising-valuations-raise-concerns/ SANDPOINT — Bonner County officials are holding question-and-answer sessions this month to address concerns stemming from rising ratings from some residents. Bonner County residents began receiving notices of property appraisals earlier this month, prompting many to become alarmed at rising appraisal values ​​– for some reaching percentages in the triple digits. “On average, the real […]]]>


SANDPOINT — Bonner County officials are holding question-and-answer sessions this month to address concerns stemming from rising ratings from some residents.

Bonner County residents began receiving notices of property appraisals earlier this month, prompting many to become alarmed at rising appraisal values ​​– for some reaching percentages in the triple digits.

“On average, the real estate of all those involved has increased by 50 to 100%,” said Bonn County Clerk Michael Rosedale on Tuesday.

A crowd of over 70 attended the first of three informative town halls hosted by Rosedale, Bonn County Assessor Donna Gow and Republican Assessor Candidate Grant Dorman.

The goal of these gatherings is to explain how estimated real estate values ​​affect an individual’s wealth taxes.

“We’re just trying to explain how [assessed values] Interplay with what your taxes will be. If your assessment doubles, that doesn’t mean your taxes will double. On average, it can’t go up more than 3%,” Rosedale said. “Some will rise more, others less.”

Under Idaho Law Title 63, tax districts may increase their annual budget by up to 3% over the previous year.

A tax district is an area in which a corporation has the authority to levy a tax. The purpose of district taxation is to ensure that necessary services receive adequate funding. Some examples of tax districts are the county, and fire, school, sewage, and hospital districts. All individuals live in more than one tax district.

An individual’s property taxes are calculated based on their respective district’s budgets divided by the number of taxpayers residing in the area.

Real estate values ​​simply determine how much of a share a person is responsible for—those who own more pay more in taxes.

Based on feedback at City Hall on Tuesday, many residents expressed concerns that their taxes will mimic the rise in property valuations. However, as Bonner County real estate values ​​as a whole rise, the tax hikes won’t rise as dramatically as estimated real estate values, Rosedale said.

“You can look at this like a cake. No matter how big the batter gets — those are our estimates, you only have one cup of sauce — that’s the tax we collect,” Rosedale said.

One participant asked how individuals could have a say in how their taxes are used, apart from voting.

“I have a steady income, okay,” the man said. “We, the people, used to have a place where we could voice our grievances. What can we do? Do we have a say other than the ballot box?”

“You do,” Rosedale said.

The case officer encouraged everyone to attend hearings in their respective tax districts. A person’s specific tax jurisdictions can be found on their property appraisal. Additionally, Rosedale encouraged people to attend the county’s budget hearings beginning July 18 and to contact their state legislatures regarding taxation.

Bonner County property owners have the opportunity to discuss their property values ​​directly with the Assessor’s Office prior to June 27, also known as the investigation period. This deadline is an alternative to appealing to the District Compensation Committee. After June 27, disputes over property valuation must appear before the Compensation Committee.

Contact information for all county officers can be found on the county website at BonnerCountyID.gov. A tax estimation calculator is available on the Treasurer’s Office website at bctreasurer-bcgisid.hub.arcgis.com

The next informal town hall meeting will be Thursday at 6:30 p.m. at Athol Baptist Church. A virtual town hall will be held on June 21 at 12:00 p.m. on the Barbara Carpenter Show on 97.1.

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County BZA Denies Wedding Venue Exception – InkFreeNews.com https://tac-lawna.org/county-bza-denies-wedding-venue-exception-inkfreenews-com/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 22:00:39 +0000 https://tac-lawna.org/county-bza-denies-wedding-venue-exception-inkfreenews-com/ At the June meeting of the Kosciusko County Board of Zoning Appeals, petitioner Paul Suddon is seen from left; Dan Richard, Director of the Planning Commission; Amy Irwin, Regulations Administrator; Charlotte Siegfried, BZA member; Lee Harman, BZA President; and BZA member Randy Cox views video of Suddon’s property. Photo by Lauren Zeugner. By Lauren ZeugnerInkFreeNews […]]]>

At the June meeting of the Kosciusko County Board of Zoning Appeals, petitioner Paul Suddon is seen from left; Dan Richard, Director of the Planning Commission; Amy Irwin, Regulations Administrator; Charlotte Siegfried, BZA member; Lee Harman, BZA President; and BZA member Randy Cox views video of Suddon’s property. Photo by Lauren Zeugner.

By Lauren Zeugner
InkFreeNews

WARSAW — Courtney Fields’ application for an exemption for the purpose of permitting a commercial recreation and wedding venue in an agricultural district was unanimously denied by the regular meeting of the Kosciusko County Appeals Committee on Tuesday, June 14.

Fields’ property is located east of SR 13, west of Old SR 13 in Washington Township, just north of Pierceton. She told the board she wants to use the property to host weddings of up to 300 guests, as well as other events.

After she outlined her plans for operating hours, parking, and drainage, Dan Richard, Director of the Planning Commission, presented 11 letters of protest to the board. Local attorney Steve Snyder, who represented scores of protesters, several of whom attended the hearing, gave a detailed explanation as to why the board should reject the exception.

He argued that the venue would cause traffic problems in an area that had seen numerous collisions, and listed other concerns – limited parking, light pollution, noise pollution and drainage issues – the property has a wetland area near its northern property line.

There is also a circular ditch running through the property which is almost full. Snyder also pointed out that the property would require a commercial septic system overseen by the state health department. One of Snyder’s exhibits came from a neighbor who is a veterinary assistant. The exhibit said that so many people going in and out could stress nearby livestock, while a local agent wrote that it would negatively impact the values ​​of neighboring properties.

Fields tried to defend her plan, saying she wanted the venue to look like a farmhouse and host “upscale weddings.” She told the board the site plan was only intended to give the board an idea of ​​what she was planning for the company.

Lee Harman, president of the BZA board, indicated significant opposition from neighbors and opposed the exception. His motion was accepted by the rest of the board.

Tammy Cotton, program coordinator for Living in Transition Effectively, came before the board and requested an exception to allow the modification and modification of a non-confirming use, allowing for the use of a vicarage as transitional housing for up to six women and an in-program/house director at an estate on Catherine Street in Milford.

Cotton explained that the program is supported by the United Methodist District and Conference. LITE helps women transition from county jail back into the community by providing a variety of services. The program uses the former Milford United Methodist Church next door.

Milford City Council sent a letter of support to the board. Pastor Mike Beezley, who was appointed by the United Methodist Conference to oversee LITE’s program, told the board, “We are doing this under the eyes of the conference… I assure you they have great oversight.”

Dan Brown, a neighbor who lives next door to the church and vicarage, said: “This is a unique opportunity for the church. I’m happy to see something on this corner that has a lot of support.”

Van Buren Parish Trustee Becky Alles told the board it was devastating to close the church, but “God is moving in a wonderful way… This is a much-needed program in our church.” The board unanimously approved the motion.

In a follow-up last month, the board heard a variance motion from the Indiana North District Wesleyan Church, which sought to reduce the required parking spaces from 125 to 61 for a commercial property.

A civil engineer from Dollar General, the trading company that is buying into the property, said the company has requested a reduction in the number of parking spaces in the past. He also discussed the landscape plan.

Richards told the engineer that 10 trees doesn’t provide much of a buffer. He called for more green to be included in the landscape plan. Harman asked about drainage issues. Richards was told there would be no drainage from the parking lot onto surrounding properties.

Silver Lake City Council President Hugh Murfin told BZA the council is in favor of Dollar General reducing the number of parking spaces and said a competitor has just 12 parking spaces and appears to be doing well.

Carolyn Montel told BZA she had no problem reducing parking. Her problem was the entrance to the parking lot directly across from her living room window. “Dixie Drive is a residential street. Entry/exit should be on SR 15,” she said.

The board approved the application as submitted.

The board also approved the following petitions:

  • An exception to allow RV storage in an agricultural district. The property, owned by Javier Ivan Gonzalez, is located on the CR 1300N in the municipality of Van Buren.
  • A deviation to allow a residence to remain as built by the previous owner and to allow the construction of a screened pavilion. The property is owned by Shawn Bloom.
  • An exception to allow a home business in an agricultural district. The property, owned by Michael Young, is located on Syracuse Webster Road in the community of Turkey Creek.
  • A deviation requested by Paul Suddon to build a carport over an RV a foot from the side property line. This was approved pending a letter of approval from Suddon’s neighbors.
  • A deviation requested by James Tranter to allow an existing coach house to remain as placed. Approved with a $1,000 settlement.
  • A deviation requested by Tim Towne to install a handicapped accessible bathroom. The addition would be zero feet from the west touchline. Approved with the consent of the neighbor.
  • A deviation requested by Michael Burkholder to amend and modify an earlier case to allow the construction of a 78ft x 122ft addition to an existing building.
  • A derogation requested by Jonathan and April Wyngarden to permit construction of a new residence zero feet from the water’s edge and 20 feet from the Crow Road right of way.
  • A deviation requested by Whitney Clark Lambert to allow an existing 10′ x 16′ shed to remain as it was erected. The board approved leaving the shed in place pending sewerage installation and operation.
  • A derogation requested by Ashley Ries to allow a 12ft x 30ft shed to be relocated 5ft from the driveway.

After handling numerous petitions involving sheds being put up without a permit, BZA member Randy Cox said: “We have all these pop-up shops that sell sheds. You have to tell people they need a permit!”

The board also continued two cases relating to followers that Ryan Stuckman placed in Blacks Court.

The board also approved two carry-over cases from the hearing officer’s meeting on Monday 13 June.

  • Joel Beery’s request for a different permit to approve an existing deck has been approved, but he has yet to seek approval.
  • David Hartman’s request for a variance to allow for the construction of an annex, a paved patio and an in-ground pool 13 feet from the water’s edge was granted, subject to neighbor approval.
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The nearly 3-acre Scott’s Addition assemblage is selling for $10.8 million https://tac-lawna.org/the-nearly-3-acre-scotts-addition-assemblage-is-selling-for-10-8-million/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 04:54:28 +0000 https://tac-lawna.org/the-nearly-3-acre-scotts-addition-assemblage-is-selling-for-10-8-million/ The apartments planned for the N. Chasen & Son site. (Reproduced with permission from Capital Square) There was another record-breaking land deal in Scott’s Addition. Last week, Capital Square bought about 2.7 acres of land near the intersection of West Marshall Street and Altamont Avenue for $10.8 million. The bulk of the deal involved N. […]]]>

The apartments planned for the N. Chasen & Son site. (Reproduced with permission from Capital Square)

There was another record-breaking land deal in Scott’s Addition.

Last week, Capital Square bought about 2.7 acres of land near the intersection of West Marshall Street and Altamont Avenue for $10.8 million.

The bulk of the deal involved N. Chasen & Son’s holdings at 2919-2924 W. Marshall Streets and 2915 W. Clay Streets. Capital Square also acquired the boarded up building of the former Boulevard Baptist Church at 2944 W. Marshall St.

The deal is for $4 million per acre, the highest land sale ever in the coveted area. The previous high was held by the DC development group, which purchased 1117-1209 N. Arthur Ashe Blvd. last year for $3.8 million per acre.

Capital Square plans to demolish the existing structures to make way for a trio of 350-unit mid-rise apartment buildings.

The project has been in the works for over a year as Capital Square originally planned to partner with Maryland-based Lerner Enterprises. In addition to their developmental work, the Lerner family is also the majority owner of the Washington Nationals, although it is recently reported that they are investigating the sale of the baseball franchise.

“We amicably parted ways over time,” said Adam Stifel, Capital Square’s executive vice president of development, of the company’s relationship with Lerner. “We just focused more on Richmond and Scott’s Addition than they did.”

The Chasen family bought their lots at Scott’s Addition in the early 1970’s and have operated their painting and carpentry business in the neighborhood ever since. N. Chasen & Son will remain there until the end of 2022, after which Capital Square plans to start demolition and construction in the first quarter of 2023, according to Stifel.

  1. N. Chasen & Son CFO Leisa Deffenbaugh said the business will continue, albeit with a new headquarters.

The painting and carpentry firm N. Chasen & Son has been in Scott’s Addition since the early 1970s. (Photo by Mike Platania)

“We’ll be finding a new home soon, but I can’t share anything yet,” Deffenbaugh said.

The seller of the property adjacent to the Boulevard Baptist Church was the First Baptist Church of Richmond, according to city records.

Not included in the sale was Longoven’s neighboring home at 2939 W. Clay St., which N. Chasen & Son retains and continues to lease to the restaurant.

The Chasen properties were valued at $7.2 million and the church building at $842,000. CBRE’s Jason Hetherington, Chris Wallace and Matt Hamilton represented the Chasens in the deal.

Stifel said the new apartments will be similar in design to The Otis, the six-story building Capital Square is working on at 1601 Roseneath Road with South Carolina-based developer Greystar. Like The Otis, the new project comprises four floors of apartments on two floors of structured parking and Poole & Poole Architecture is the designer of the project.

The two projects will differ, among other things, in the amount of commercial space. While The Otis has about 10,000 square feet of commercial space — and has secured tenants like PlantHouse, Grit Coffee and Charlottesville-based bakery Cou Cou Rachou — Stifel said the project on the Chasen lot will likely have between 2,500 and 5,000 square feet of commercial space.

Stifel said the success of pre-letting the nearby Scott’s Collection apartments in Capital Square has prompted the company to continue planning projects in the neighborhood.

“We’re doing a really good job on our first deal across the street,” Stifel said, pointing to the Ink Building at Scott’s Collection at 3000-3008 W. Clay St. “We have learned some lessons from what the market wants.”

Nearly 2,500 residential units are currently under construction or planned at Scott’s Addition.

One project that has recently come to light is a 250-unit building designed by Blackwood Development at 1701 Roseneath Road.

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Tom Cruise, the real estate mogul – Here’s how the Top Gun Maverick actor spends his $600 million net worth on lavish homes around the world, from a Beverly Hills mansion to a stunning Colorado ranch to an English estate. https://tac-lawna.org/tom-cruise-the-real-estate-mogul-heres-how-the-top-gun-maverick-actor-spends-his-600-million-net-worth-on-lavish-homes-around-the-world-from-a-beverly-hills-mansion-to-a-stunning-colorado-ranch/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 11:10:42 +0000 https://tac-lawna.org/tom-cruise-the-real-estate-mogul-heres-how-the-top-gun-maverick-actor-spends-his-600-million-net-worth-on-lavish-homes-around-the-world-from-a-beverly-hills-mansion-to-a-stunning-colorado-ranch/ Tom Cruise needs no introduction and his most recent resurgence to worldwide fame came with Top Gun: Maverick, a sequel to the 1986 original. The film just screened at the Cannes Film Festival, where it ‘surprised’ it with the Palme d’Or , the highest prize awarded at the event. The blockbuster, which hit theaters on […]]]>

Tom Cruise needs no introduction and his most recent resurgence to worldwide fame came with Top Gun: Maverick, a sequel to the 1986 original. The film just screened at the Cannes Film Festival, where it ‘surprised’ it with the Palme d’Or , the highest prize awarded at the event. The blockbuster, which hit theaters on May 25, is already set to become a box office giant, according to its IMDB page, as the first Top Gun movie grossed over $357 million.

During Cruise’s 41-year career, his films have grossed over US$4 billion in North America and over US$10.1 billion worldwide – making him one of the most celebrated film stars of our time.

According to multiple reports, Cruise, 59, has amassed a net worth in excess of half a billion ($600 million to be exact) and loves to squander his staggering fortune on cars, private jets, charities and of course his fortune Multi-million dollar mansions.

While the Mission Impossible star’s real estate portfolio has changed hands over the years, it’s still a pleasure for his fans to glimpse the Hollywood icon’s collection, whether in the US or the UK. Here’s the breakdown…

Tom Cruise’s mansion in Beverly Hills. Photo: Google Maps

His $30.5 million Beverly Hills mansion
Cruise raised the bar when he bought a mega mansion in Beverly Hills with his then-wife Katie Holmes for a whopping $30.5 million in 2007, per Love Property.

While the Minority Report star sold the mansion for $38 million nearly a decade later, less than the original $50 million asking price, his former estate is still one of Hollywood’s OTT stars.

Built in 1937 with a classic European facade, the mansion features seven bedrooms and nine bathrooms inside on over 10,000 square feet of land. It also has a large garden, a pool, tennis and basketball courts, as well as several guest houses and a large playground for children.

Cruise’s now-estranged daughter Suri also lived at the property from a young age with mother Holmes. The once-powerful couple spent many happy days at their Beverly Hills mansion as it sits on a secluded lot and offered plenty of privacy for the famous family.

The hot property was snapped up by American investor and billionaire Leon Black.

Tom Cruise’s English estate is in West Sussex. Photo: Savills

His exquisite West Sussex estate
If you’re a global superstar like Cruise, chances are you own real estate everywhere. Cruise bought an 11,000 square foot English country estate in East Grinstead in 2006 for over US$3.8 million (£3million).

Known as Rede Place, the property offers plenty of open space and lush gardens, as well as a swimming pool, spa and tennis court. With a total of eight bedrooms and five bathrooms, the property is divided into the main house and a separate guest pavilion, reports Love Property. The icing on the cake, however, is in the basement, as it includes an all-in-one entertainment area that includes a cinema, game room, and dance studio with a sprung floor.

Tom Cruise’s English estate in West Sussex was sold to reality star Peter Andre in 2016. Photo: Savills

The mega villa offers traditional meets modern design. It is believed that Cruise chose the English property due to its proximity to the UK headquarters of the Church of Scientology Saint Hill, of which the actor is a proud member.

According to Sussex Live, the actor sold the property to reality star Peter Andre for $6.2million (£5million) in 2016, but returned to the small town of Sussex during the Covid-19 lockdown and stayed at the church’s headquarters.

Tom Cruise’s former home in Hollywood Hills in California, USA. Photo: The Altman brothers

He sold his massive Hollywood Hills home to Eva Longoria
In 2015, Cruise sold his beautiful Hollywood Hills home to actress Eva Longoria for $11.4 million (he originally asked for $13 million).

Tom Cruise’s Hollywood Hills home has been sold to Desperate Housewives actress Eva Longoria. Photo: The Altman brothers

The property was believed to be a lavish European-style villa, fitted out and fitted with wide wooden plank floors, Venetian stucco walls and a rustic Italian farmhouse kitchen. It was a little smaller than his other properties, with three en-suite bedrooms and a slate-roofed guest house as a fourth additional room.

Longoria reportedly sold the property at a loss for about $8.2 million in 2020, according to multiple sources. It was also rumored that Cruise had used this property as a Scientology retreat rather than his full-time residence.

Tom Cruise’s remote ranch in Colorado, USA. Photo: Sotheby’s International Realty

His incredible $59 million ranch in Colorado
One of Cruise’s most extravagant properties would be his stunning Colorado ranch, which has a staggering price tag of $59 million. The property consists of four bedrooms in the main house and three bedrooms in the guest house and is located on a 10,000 square foot ranch in Telluride. He bought it in 2014. In addition to a large kitchen, living and dining room, the incredible property also features a gym, lounge and library.

Like his Beverly Hills mansion, Cruise’s ranch in Colorado holds special memories for the Hollywood star, having spent a lot of time here with ex-wife Holmes and daughter Suri.

Tom Cruise’s former ranch in Colorado is absolutely stunning. Photo: Sotheby’s International Realty

Built in 1994, the home features rustic cedar and native stone with beamed ceilings, reports Forbes. Outside the property there are also tennis, basketball and ice hockey courts and a private trail system with access and views of the 15,000 foot mountains in the distance with a private gate into the Uncompahgre National Forest.

He parted ways with his Colorado ranch in 2021 when he sold it for a whopping $39.5 million.

Tom Cruise’s former apartment in New York City. Photo: Village Conservation

His 2,200 square foot apartment in New York City
Born in Syracuse, New York City, Cruise definitely has a special bond with his hometown. So it’s not surprising that he bought some of his previous properties in the Big Apple. According to US Magazine, his New York apartment was 2,200 square feet, with two bedrooms, two bathrooms, and a gym.

Tom Cruise and Nicole Kidman were married from 1990 to 2001. Photo: Reuters

The actor resided in the American Felt building and shared the unit – at separate times – with ex-wives Nicole Kidman and Holmes. The publication also stated that Cruise’s former girlfriends – Rebecca De Mornay and pop diva Cher – had also spent some time in the apartment. Cruise let go of the property after his divorce and sold it for $3 million.

Tom Cruise’s penthouse in Clearwater, Florida. Photo: Coldwell Bankers

Now Cruise lives in a multi-million dollar penthouse in Florida
The Risky Business star is reportedly now living in a luxurious penthouse in the city of Clearwater, Florida, also known as the home of Scientology.

The property features a huge rooftop swimming pool as well as a flight simulator room, concierge service, cinema and car lift. The latter will be used to transport the actor’s sweet rides to an ultra-secure parking garage that can accommodate up to nine vehicles.

Tom Cruise is reportedly currently living in his penthouse in Clearwater, Florida with his adopted son, Connor. Photo: Coldwell Bankers

He bought back the penthouse in 2017 and occupied the top two floors, dubbed The SkyView as it offers unparalleled views of the city. British media reports that Cruise is currently living in the Clearwater penthouse with his son Connor and the property is the brainchild of another multimillionaire Scientologist, Moises Agami.

Note: This story was originally published on SCMP and has been republished on this website.

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Inside Housing – Insight – Flying Fixes: Can Drones Help Solve the Social Housing Repair Crisis? https://tac-lawna.org/inside-housing-insight-flying-fixes-can-drones-help-solve-the-social-housing-repair-crisis/ Mon, 06 Jun 2022 06:02:33 +0000 https://tac-lawna.org/inside-housing-insight-flying-fixes-can-drones-help-solve-the-social-housing-repair-crisis/ Yorkshire Housing recently took part in a pilot project to conduct repair inspections using drones. John Wimperis talks to the landlord about what he learned from the project and what the technology could mean for the sector One property featured in Yorkshire Housing’s drone pilot was a converted church in Harrogate, now occupied by tenant […]]]>

Yorkshire Housing recently took part in a pilot project to conduct repair inspections using drones. John Wimperis talks to the landlord about what he learned from the project and what the technology could mean for the sector

One property featured in Yorkshire Housing’s drone pilot was a converted church in Harrogate, now occupied by tenant farmers

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Can drones help the industry get a grip on the repair crisis? @insidehousing takes a close look at the landlord rising to heaven #UKhousing


For the past 18 months, the repair crisis has made national headlines.

Pressure is mounting on social housing providers to ensure aging stock is livable for tenants, with housing quality coming under scrutiny in a way not seen in years.

An expanded social housing regulator, which will now survey the performance of social landlords in relation to consumer standards, and a more active housing ombudsman will ensure organizations that let tenants down are identified and shamed.

As a result, many providers are looking for new ways to ensure that problems in homes are identified and resolved quickly and the problems don’t get worse.

Some even seek help from above.

Yorkshire Housing is one such provider.

The 18,000-unit landlord recently participated in the Department of Transportation’s Drone Pathfinder program. The pilot, which Yorkshire Housing partnered with drone operator Vantage UAV, used the technology to inspect properties.

The drone surveyed three Yorkshire Housing properties and the housing association identified a number of benefits. A key benefit was how much time the drones save the association compared to traditional surveys.

Josh Ambler, innovation analyst at Yorkshire Housing says: “One of the things that we hope to reduce through the use of drones is the use of scaffolding and aerial work platforms.”

“The drone flew around all morning and we got all the information without endangering anyone and without disturbing customers.”

He adds: “If we had scaffolding, it would probably stand for days. With a drone, on the other hand, you can do it within a few hours.”

And the drone system is more time-efficient than other solutions, especially for buildings that are difficult to access.

One property featured in the drone pilot was a converted church in Harrogate, now occupied by tenant farmers. This unusual building required an innovative approach to inspections from Yorkshire Housing.

“In the past, we’ve literally had jungle gyms climb up the outside of the building to do an inspection,” says Andy Gamble, Executive Director of Growth and Assets. “The drone flew around all morning and we got all the information without endangering anyone and without disturbing customers.”

From its recordings, Vantage UAV was able to create a 3D model of the building. Yorkshire Housing was then able to use the images to identify specific problems with the roof.

Prior to the drone survey, the housing association had planned to refurbish the converted church at an estimated cost of £300,000. After inspection, however, it chose instead to fix the specific issues at almost an eighth the cost.

In addition to 3D modelling, drones can be used to create highly detailed photographic maps of an area – called orthomosaics – by combining a series of aerial photographs.

These can provide a live video feed from the drone’s camera, which in some cases may be enough for an inspection.

“You can get much better results than sending someone on the roof. You can see the entire roof and not just what the person can see at that point in time.”

Mr Ambler says surveyors came out one day to look at the footage while inspecting a flat roofed property where a leak had been reported.

“The drone footage alone enabled him to determine where the water was coming from on the spot,” he says.

Mr. Ambler describes the images as “crystal clear”. He says: “You can get much better results than sending someone on the roof. You can see the entire roof and not just what the person can see at that point in time.”

While drones can produce great results, they’re not always the most cost-effective solution, Bromford noted. The federation bought a drone in 2014 to test the idea of ​​using it for inspections, but found the cost of inspecting its mainly low population was not worth it.

Bromford’s innovation coach Paul Taylor said at the time: “Actually, it’s cheaper to send someone up a ladder unless you have a stock profile that’s worth training someone on.”

From its recordings, Vantage UAV was able to create a 3D model of the building.  Yorkshire Housing was then able to use the images to identify specific problems with the roof

From its recordings, Vantage UAV was able to create a 3D model of the building. Yorkshire Housing was then able to use the images to identify specific problems with the roof

Drone pilots require licenses as well as considerable expertise and as such, despite its benefits, many housing associations and municipalities will find it inefficient to bring this technology indoors.

According to Gamble, Yorkshire Housing originally hoped to do so, but since the trial it has decided that hiring a drone operating company to carry out the checks offered better value for money.

“They can handle all the permits, they have the right pilots, they have the right drones, so we probably wouldn’t invest directly; we’ll probably outsource that to a specialist,” he says.

Mr Gamble says he was told a typical quote for a day survey by drone could be £1,200. Vantage UAV said its prices varied significantly depending on the type and size of the job, but claimed its services would result in savings of between 70% and 95% over other inspection methods.

And it’s these potential savings that could lead others to follow in Yorkshire Housing’s footsteps, leading to the widespread use of drones in social housing.

Yorkshire Housing was able to fix specific problems at its converted church rather than reroof the entire property, and was able to use its savings of more than $250,000 to renovate another building it needed.

And if housing inspections can be carried out more efficiently, social landlords will free up more resources to focus on other areas of the business, including repairing houses in disrepair, just like Yorkshire Housing.

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Vic Keegan’s Lost London 272: All Hallows – a hidden church in the heart of the city https://tac-lawna.org/vic-keegans-lost-london-272-all-hallows-a-hidden-church-in-the-heart-of-the-city/ Sat, 04 Jun 2022 10:12:38 +0000 https://tac-lawna.org/vic-keegans-lost-london-272-all-hallows-a-hidden-church-in-the-heart-of-the-city/ All Hallows survived in various forms in the financial center for nine centuries before being partially transplanted to Twickenham The City of London prides itself on the peaceful coexistence of God and mammon. Dozens of churches have survived in one of the world’s most concentrated areas dedicated to the worship of money. The most poignant […]]]>

All Hallows survived in various forms in the financial center for nine centuries before being partially transplanted to Twickenham

The City of London prides itself on the peaceful coexistence of God and mammon. Dozens of churches have survived in one of the world’s most concentrated areas dedicated to the worship of money. The most poignant example is the intersection of two of the city’s most famous streets. One of these is Gracechurch Street, the name of which derives from the preceding ones including: according to A Survey of London (1603) “because the market of Grasse went under like that”. The other is Lombard Street, named after Italian financiers from Lombardy who established goldsmith shops there in 1318, the forerunners of modern banks.

One of the most famous of these banks was Barclays, which for many years owned most of the land where the two streets met as its headquarters. This manifestation of mammon almost suffocated the All Hallows Church – not to be confused with the All Hallows of London Wall – which can trace its origins to Christian worship at this site since 1053. But although obscured it retained its presence for centuries, being rebuilt twice and containing a stone porch which, according to Henry VIII, came from the Priory of St John of Jerusalem in Clerkenwell dissolved the monasteries In the 16th century.

It did not escape the great fire of 1966, which completely destroyed the church. But 20 years later a completely new one was built on the same spot (main image) by Christopher Wren, although it couldn’t be seen from the street. In the 1830s, George Godwin, founder of the influential The Builder magazine, observed that All Hallows was so constrained by other buildings that ‘it is difficult to discover even when searched for; it was consequently called ‘the invisible church’.”

It is now completely invisible in its original location as it is no longer there. In 1939 it was demolished but Wren’s tower and porch survived, were dismantled and taken stone by stone to Twickenham to form a part another brand new All Hallows, which is close to the famous rugby stadium there (see below). It also contains the pews and pulpit from the town and a stunning altarpiece which is very likely the work of the eminent carver Grinning gibbonor his studio.

All Hallows was not the only London church to be demolished and rebuilt elsewhere. St Andrew’s north of Oxford Street was moved 10 miles to Kingsbury, and St Mary, Aldermanbury went as far as Fulton, Missouri. Others, like Christchurch Greyfriars and The Lovely St Dunstan to the easthave survived as iconic public spaces on land worth many millions at today’s prices.

The miracle is that so many churches have survived at a time of rising property prices. Most of them are still active, but you don’t have to be religious to admire the architecture and buried history in each and every one of them. The New Testament may be right about serving God and mammon, but the City of London seems to have found an acceptable compromise.

All previous parts of Vic Keegan’s Lost London can be found here and a book containing many of them is available for purchase here. Keep following Vic Twitter.

On London strives to offer more of the kind of journalism the capital city needs. Become a supporter for £5 a month or £50 a year and receive an action-packed weekly newsletter and free entry to online events. details here.

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Escrow, Leasehold, Revision, ₹10 Crore Target in 2022-23 | Kolkata News https://tac-lawna.org/escrow-leasehold-revision-%e2%82%b910-crore-target-in-2022-23-kolkata-news/ Thu, 02 Jun 2022 02:47:00 +0000 https://tac-lawna.org/escrow-leasehold-revision-%e2%82%b910-crore-target-in-2022-23-kolkata-news/ KOLKATA: The Office of Administrator General and Official Trustee of West Bengal is renegotiating age-old rents that are out of sync with current market rates to revise them upwards and is targeting a nearly triple income increase. Hundreds of prime properties in Calcutta and the rest of the state, and land and buildings in other […]]]>
KOLKATA: The Office of Administrator General and Official Trustee of West Bengal is renegotiating age-old rents that are out of sync with current market rates to revise them upwards and is targeting a nearly triple income increase.
Hundreds of prime properties in Calcutta and the rest of the state, and land and buildings in other states, have been entrusted to the Bureau by the Calcutta High Court by the Official Trustees Act 1913 or the Administrator General Act 1963. However, the rental income from these properties is comparative to the market price a pittance.
Biplab Roy, the current general manager and official trustee of West Bengal, says he wants to change that by scrutinizing leases and renegotiating with leaseholders or tenants. Whilst he has already successfully drafted new leases with 29 parties and increased the cumulative annual rent of these properties from Rs 17.9 lakh to Rs 99.9 lakh, around 3,000 contracts remain to be reviewed and then revised.
The office has set an income target of Rs 10 crore from rent and bank interest in 2022-23, up from Rs 3.4 crore in 2021-22.
Investigation of old agreements has uncovered various irregularities, including subletting and even illegal sale of escrow or estate properties under the Office’s care.
On BB Ganguly Street, the office recently noted the sale of a 250 sqft jewelry store for Rs 1 crore when the tenant came to the office to negotiate the rent from Rs 3,000 a month to Rs 4,000.
“Not only are tenants making a bunch of money, they are also trying to dictate the terms of how much the rent adjustment will be. We have rejected the proposal and are taking legal action,” Roy said.
Roy has also filed FIRs against fraudulent transactions on SN Banerjee Road and Raja Krishna Ghoshal Road in Kasba, leading to arrests. In Kasba, the FIR was filed against Sumit Ghosh and local developer Minta Bhanja for attempting to develop land belonging to the Surendranath Ghosh Estate.
“In the SN Banerjee Road case, a person named Akash Shaw came and took over the tenancy in 2016. He said he was the son of registered tenant Nawab Singh, who died. In 2021, when we asked him to produce his Aadhaar card and his voter card, we found that the father’s name mentioned there was Suresh Shaw,” he said.
Roy has also managed to evict many illegal residents, take possession of escrow properties and deposit FIRs. He evicted more than 85 peddlers and illegal residents of the Sealdah courthouse in 2012, who occupied virtually all open space in and around the courthouse and were conducting business off the courthouse’s power.
While most irregularities occur in the private sector, there are some that have also occurred in the government sector.
For example, at 43, Shakespeare Sarani is standing in a five-story Education Department building. The Department of Fisheries had taken over the old building for rent in the 1960s and paid the rent until 1983, when it moved to Salt Lake without relinquishing the tenancy.
After that, the Ministry of Education occupied the property and erected a five-story building there.
The Armenian Church leader has claimed that there is no record at the Land Office or KMC that the government has acquired the land. KMC records are still in the name of the Bureau as property of the Armenian Church. However, no rent was paid and no permit was sought for the construction of the building.
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Jazz concerts and wedding receptions are planned in the former church in Wolverhampton https://tac-lawna.org/jazz-concerts-and-wedding-receptions-are-planned-in-the-former-church-in-wolverhampton/ Tue, 31 May 2022 14:15:28 +0000 https://tac-lawna.org/jazz-concerts-and-wedding-receptions-are-planned-in-the-former-church-in-wolverhampton/ A Grade II listed former church in central Wolverhampton is set to be transformed into a large social hub, hosting wedding receptions and jazz concerts if new plans are given the green light. Darlington Street Methodist Church – notable for its large green dome – held its last service in September 2019, closing after almost […]]]>

A Grade II listed former church in central Wolverhampton is set to be transformed into a large social hub, hosting wedding receptions and jazz concerts if new plans are given the green light. Darlington Street Methodist Church – notable for its large green dome – held its last service in September 2019, closing after almost 120 years of service.

Rajinder Dhinsa of Hallmark Investment Properties in Wolverhampton has now submitted a bid to council to convert the building into a venue capable of hosting a variety of community functions.

Councilor Lynne Moran (Lab), who represents St Peter’s Parish where the former church is located, said: “I remember the Good Shepherd did his best to work efficiently in this church building, which given its In principle, we should keep our interesting old buildings, but that would be demanding in terms of refurbishment and safety.

READ MORE: Danger fears students and visitors over loose roof tiles of one of oldest building

“If there’s an investor willing to bring this building back to a good standard and make it commercially viable, that’s probably a good thing. Planned use for banquets is popular elsewhere and we would have to have specific planning reasons to object. The improvement in evening entertainment options is likely to fit into the overall development of the city,” she added.

Wolverhampton Conservative Group Deputy Leader Cllr Simon Bennett (Bushbury North) said: “The Darlington Street Methodist Church is one of the most historic buildings in the city center and contains a magnificent church organ. Their closure was a sad loss. It is important that the building is restored, put back into use and its heritage protected. Any project that moves forward must improve the city and it is vital that residents and local businesses alike participate in the plans.”

The proposals call for the famous large church organ to be fully restored and used as a centerpiece in the interior refurbishment. A statement from architects Stephen Sedwell said: “In our recent inquiries the positive meaning of this building has become clear here as a transitional building.”

However, Cllr Paul Birch (Lab. Blakenhall), who owns and operates Revolver Records on Goldthorn Hill, said he felt the building could be better used for another purpose. “The classic design of the early 20th century former church lends itself to becoming a new 4*/5* hotel – which we desperately need in the city centre,” he said.

“But instead of planning our city for the purpose and vision that we have, we allow developers to take ownership of buildings and then submit their building applications. Once these requests are received, the planners almost always support the developers – citing planning laws and regulations to support the decisions, tying the planning committee’s hands behind their backs.

“As a result, I think we have a cityscape that is invented by developers and not by the city itself,” he added. “As a result, we’ll likely get another Asian banquet center, which I honestly don’t think we need. A clear vision is required to create a bustling city center for businesses and residents – not the tired, outdated and quiet city we currently live in.”

The Grade II Listed building on the corner of Darlington Street and School Street first opened in 1901. The planners will make a decision on the proposals in the near future.

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