Church Properties – TAC Lawna http://tac-lawna.org/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 14:13:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://tac-lawna.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-11-150x150.png Church Properties – TAC Lawna http://tac-lawna.org/ 32 32 From our files – The Advocate Messenger https://tac-lawna.org/from-our-files-the-advocate-messenger/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 14:13:00 +0000 https://tac-lawna.org/from-our-files-the-advocate-messenger/ From our files Published 10:13 am Tuesday 13 September 2022 100 YEARS AGO – 1922 • David N. Zimmerman, a Danville native and former Danville printing shop owner, was honored upon his retirement as Assistant Postmaster at the Lexington Post Office. A friend, Wood Dunlap, said Zimmerman reminded him of a postage stamp, “with a […]]]>

From our files

Published 10:13 am Tuesday 13 September 2022

100 YEARS AGO – 1922

• David N. Zimmerman, a Danville native and former Danville printing shop owner, was honored upon his retirement as Assistant Postmaster at the Lexington Post Office. A friend, Wood Dunlap, said Zimmerman reminded him of a postage stamp, “with a job ’til it’s done.” Zimmerman began his career in March 1907 as an assistant postmaster.

• WC McAfee, Chief of the Clan in Kentucky, announced that the Clan’s fifth annual meeting would be held at the Providence Church. The McAfees of Boyle and Lincoln counties are scattered throughout Kentucky.

• Plans have been made for a trucking service to carry mail between Danville and Louisville since the Southern Railway trains have ceased service. Danville Postmaster LE Rue has been notified of the contingency plan.

• GB Daugherty of Rolling Fork said his neighborhood was drier than the oldest Fork resident remembered. Stock water was scarce, crops were badly damaged and grass was nearly burned. Rolling Fork River is almost dry and there was no water in ponds.

• Three men died as a result of a rainstorm in Boyle and Washington counties west of Perryville. William Pope was killed in a barn near Danville and two other Washington County people west of Perryville were killed by lightning. Telephone lines were damaged, fruit trees were uprooted, and several barns were destroyed.

75 YEARS AGO – 1947

• The Boyle Fiscal Court approved plans to build the viaduct over the Southern Railway System’s tracks in the West End and submitted them to the State Highway Department for approval. The Danville City Council also approves the works.

• The local six-day campaign raised 1,500 cans of food for victims of flash floods in southeastern Kentucky as part of the American Red Cross effort. Congregations from the local churches also helped with the distribution of food and other necessities.

• A Welcome Service Inc. was organized with Sara Marguerite Jackson as the hostess. She will welcome new residents and also new mothers, brides, babies and special groups. A bonus of free gifts donated by local merchants is given to visitors.

• Danville’s high-flying Yankees stunned baseball fans as they tore a premier diamond 14-6 in Campbellsville. This was Danville’s fifth straight game without a loss. Pistol Pete McCowan had seven hits during the game.

• Jack Durham, former city editor and sportswriter for Kentucky Advocate, has been appointed sports editor of the Abilene Reporter-News in Texas. He also served in the Army Air Forces and was a police reporter for the Salt Lake City Tribune.

50 YEARS AGO – 1972

• A resolution approving a neighborhood development plan for Danville was passed by the Danville City Commission and presented to the Federal Housing and Urban Development Agency. The plan was to acquire 10 lots on Carr Street and five lots on Green and South Third Streets near the Ephraim McDowell Memorial Hospital. Estimated to cost $275,000, it was to be improved north of Russell Street.

• Shakertown was designated a National Historic Landmark at a ceremony in Pleasant Hill. Home Secretary Rogers CB Norton presented the official certificate to the trustees of the restored Shaker Village.

• Volunteers who assisted at Kentucky State Hospital in 1971-72 were recognized for their work and the hours worked were: Donna West, 380 hours; Anna West, 576; Margaret McConnell, 177 hours; John Floyd, 131; La Le User, 16 hours; and Debbie Boring, 225 hours.

• There were 2,243 students enrolled in Boyle County schools. This was announced by Superintendent Roy Camic. He said about 50 more students would join the school later. Danville Superintendent ER Purdom said 2,650 students have enrolled, about 50 more than last year.

• Gary D. Huffman and David W. May, both from Danville, were among 1,300 freshmen inducted into the US Air Force Academy class in 1976. May is a 1972 graduate of Boyle County High and Huffman is a graduate of Danville High.

• Garland Bradshaw of Danville, one of the greatest show horse trainers and exhibitors of all time, was honored at the Kentucky State Fair Horse Show in Louisville. He developed many champions including four-time five-gait winner Lady Carrigan.

25 YEARS AGO – 1997

• Local businessmen ended 11-day strike by Teamsters Union members against United Postal Service. Business owners were concerned about not receiving goods on time Behavior.

• Sellers and buyers got an early start with the three-day, 450-mile yard sale along US127. The shoppers were out a day early to inspect the merchandise along the Boyle County freeway.

• The Great American AirFest planned for September in Junction City, between 20,000 and 25,000 people are expected to live in the city. Greyhound buses were to help get people to the Boyle County High School parking lot to take them to the airport for the festival.

• Danville school officials announced that they are preparing for the 1,965 students to arrive in the high school, middle school and elementary schools in the fall classes.

• Danville native Capt. Richard E. Trayner, a Navy veteran, sailed aboard the USS Constitution during the ship’s historic voyage that marked the 200th anniversary of her launch in Boston Harbor.

• Center College has been named “One of the Best Value Colleges in the Nation in College Education” by Money Magazine for the eighth consecutive year on the list.AT

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The Royal Family will not open any official books of condolences at Windsor Castle or Buckingham Palace https://tac-lawna.org/the-royal-family-will-not-open-any-official-books-of-condolences-at-windsor-castle-or-buckingham-palace/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 12:05:10 +0000 https://tac-lawna.org/the-royal-family-will-not-open-any-official-books-of-condolences-at-windsor-castle-or-buckingham-palace/ Official condolence books for the Queen will not be opened at Buckingham Palace, Windsor Castle or any other royal estate and will only be online, the royal family said. Books of condolences for the Queen will be opened in churches, theaters and local authorities across the country. The Royal Family added their “Book of Condolences” […]]]>

Official condolence books for the Queen will not be opened at Buckingham Palace, Windsor Castle or any other royal estate and will only be online, the royal family said.

Books of condolences for the Queen will be opened in churches, theaters and local authorities across the country.

The Royal Family added their “Book of Condolences” to the official website, allowing people from around the world to send messages of support as crowds gather to mourn the late Queen.

Crowds outside Buckingham Palace have laid flowers and messages in memory of Elizabeth II in scenes commemorating the death of Diana, Princess of Wales in 1997.

After Diana’s tragic car accident, people lined the streets to sign a book of condolence at Kensington Palace, where thousands of flowers covered the floor.

This time there will be no physical books of condolence in any of the royal residences, but the public can leave their messages online.

Crowds outside Buckingham Palace have laid flowers and messages in memory of Elizabeth II in scenes commemorating the death of Diana, Princess of Wales in 1997

The Royal Family have said condolences can be given online but there will be no official condolence books

The Royal Family have said condolences can be given online but there will be no official condolence books

Mounds of flowers were left outside Buckingham Palace in memory of Queen Elizabeth II

Mounds of flowers were left outside Buckingham Palace in memory of Queen Elizabeth II

Thousands have gathered outside the palace since yesterday to mourn the late monarch

Thousands have gathered outside the palace since yesterday to mourn the late monarch

The Royal Family’s website states: “A selection of messages will be passed on to members of the Royal Family and may be preserved in the Royal Archives for posterity.”

Neither the royal family nor the government will be able to accept books of condolence.

In their national mourning guidance, the royal family said: “There will be opportunities to sign condolence books at various town halls and other locations across the UK. Please check with your local authority.’

The guideline also states that any organization or person may create a book of condolences during the period of national mourning.

Books are usually placed on a drop-leaf table with a white tablecloth, a floral arrangement – usually lilies or other white flowers – and a framed formal photograph of the Queen with a black ribbon wrapped around the upper right corner as a mark of respect.

Local councils across the UK have set up books for people to write messages of support in – some physically and others online.

Cllr James Jamieson, Chair of the Local Government Association, said in a statement: “Councils have been proud to serve Her Majesty throughout her reign and will continue to do so, now making local arrangements to ensure the public do so encourage them to express their own sympathy.

The Duke of Edinburgh and Queen are seen here looking at the mounds of flowers left outside Buckingham Palace in memory of Princess Diana on 5th September 1997

The Duke of Edinburgh and Queen are seen here looking at the mounds of flowers left outside Buckingham Palace in memory of Princess Diana on 5th September 1997

Prince Charles with Prince William and Prince Harry.  They look at flowers left by his wife and her mother outside Kensington Palace.  The photo was taken in September 1997

Prince Charles with Prince William and Prince Harry. They look at flowers left by his wife and her mother outside Kensington Palace. The photo was taken in September 1997

“These precautions include opening both public and virtual books of condolence, ensuring flags are flown at half-mast and overseeing arrangements for laying flowers in public areas.”

Portsmouth City Council, Westminster City Council, Swansea City Council, Derby City Council, Preston City Council, Nottingham City Council, Lancashire County Council and Belfast City Council have already prepared books for local residents to sign.

Elsewhere, the Church of England website has launched an online memorial book and is encouraging people to light a virtual candle for the Queen.

At Worcester Cathedral, hundreds of visitors had signed books of condolence, which were laid out in the Lady Chapel next to a large framed photograph of the Queen.

Locals also placed dozens of floral tributes around the base of a war memorial in the cathedral grounds, including one with a note that read, “Ma’am, you were a constant in my life, you are sorely missed.”

The cathedral’s dean, Reverend Peter Atkinson, said it will remain open every day up to and including the day of the Queen’s funeral for people to light a candle, pause, sit, reflect, remember and give thanks.

He said: “This is a place where the people of Worcestershire and beyond have come in times of sorrow and joy for hundreds of years.

“This is the Cathedral doing what the Cathedral is doing once again at this very important moment in our national life.”

The Central Council of Church Bell Ringers also encouraged congregations to open books of condolence as it recommended ringing muted bells for an hour on Friday from noon.

St. Philip’s Cathedral, Lincoln Cathedral, Guildford Cathedral and Wakefield Cathedral in Birmingham are among those that keep books of condolence for visitors to sign.

Theaters across the country also open condolence books and dim their lights, observe a minute’s silence and play the national anthem before performances as a mark of respect.

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Homes Under the Hammer couple are transforming a 175-year-old church into a ‘forever’ home – worth £1million https://tac-lawna.org/homes-under-the-hammer-couple-are-transforming-a-175-year-old-church-into-a-forever-home-worth-1million/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 03:00:00 +0000 https://tac-lawna.org/homes-under-the-hammer-couple-are-transforming-a-175-year-old-church-into-a-forever-home-worth-1million/ A few miles west of Bradford is the village of Denholme in West Yorkshire and in 2017 Martel visited a very special auction property. She said: “On ‘Homes Under the Hammer’ I don’t often see a property like the one we’re about to see and it got me pretty excited. It was built in 1846, […]]]>

A few miles west of Bradford is the village of Denholme in West Yorkshire and in 2017 Martel visited a very special auction property. She said: “On ‘Homes Under the Hammer’ I don’t often see a property like the one we’re about to see and it got me pretty excited. It was built in 1846, it’s a 19th century Gothic church here on the outskirts of the village of Denholme.’ At the time it had a guide price of £80,000 to £90,000.

As he stepped foot inside the church, Martel said, “This place just opens up into something really, really special. Actually, I’m a bit emotional. So, the ceiling, the arches, the windows, the brickwork, there’s actually no glass in the windows.

“Yes, there is so much that needs to be done, but they say in a situation like this, always look past the problems and I can because it only takes the imagination to see how special this place could be restored.”

“But the problems, yes, they are extensive. Behind me, I can see through to the rafters, so part of the ceiling has disappeared. I can even see a beam that has come down and hit the ground.”

There was some fire damage and broken walls on the other side of the altar. Martel said whoever took on the project needed to know how big it was going to be.

Being a listed building, the renovation work would also have required specialists.

READ MORE: Monty Don shares how to ‘fix’ worn lawns before winter.

“There will then be another level above that with three more en-suite bedrooms and hopefully it all fits in quite comfortably.”

The couple wanted there to be a lot of open space while still keeping the ‘Gothic theme’ throughout. Sean said, “All doors will be lancet arch doors and all furnishings will be Gothic in style.”

Homes Under the Hammer revisited the home in November 2018 to see the progress the couple had made on their home.

Debs and Sean were now married and renovations had begun, with the church’s interior covered in scaffolding. They had also repaired the roof and removed the ceiling.

However, they still had a long way to go to complete the building within their two-year target and budget of £350,000-400,000. Homes Under the Hammer was revisited two and a half years later to see the finished home.

CONTINUE READING: Engineer Shares Cheapest Method to Boil Water to Save on Bills

By fusing old and new, the couple had completely transformed the church. Downstairs was a large blue kitchen with modern appliances overlooking a bright seating area.

At the rear of the former nave was a second reception room with a pool table. Upstairs, on the first floor, were two bedrooms for Debs and Sean’s grandchildren.

The couple also created a guest wing housed in part of the bell tower. It contained a living room and bedroom with en-suite bathroom and was intended to be used as a holiday rental.

Up another flight of stairs to the second floor was Deb and Sean’s master bedroom, which had a king size bed, lots of rugs and chic wallpaper, complete with their cat lying on the bed.

They were also lucky enough to have enough space to build a huge walk-in closet and modern bathroom.

As if that wasn’t enough, there was now a fabulous south aisle courtyard created by a family friend.

Debs said: “We spent just under £420,000. But we did the outside, which pushed us a bit further outside.”

A local real estate agent visited the house to see how much the property would be worth now if it was put on the open market.

The expert said: “This is definitely one of the most amazing properties I have ever seen. For me one of the highlights of the property is the main entertaining area with the kitchen, the open floor to ceiling and all the architectural ceilings.

“I would value this property between £950,000 and £1,000,000.”

Taking the higher end of the valuation would mean the house price has risen by a whopping £915,000.

Debs and Sean were happy with that price but had no intention of selling the house.

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How much opposition will there be to a proposed senior citizen facility on West Cliff Drive? https://tac-lawna.org/how-much-opposition-will-there-be-to-a-proposed-senior-citizen-facility-on-west-cliff-drive/ Tue, 06 Sep 2022 13:42:27 +0000 https://tac-lawna.org/how-much-opposition-will-there-be-to-a-proposed-senior-citizen-facility-on-west-cliff-drive/ have something to say? Lookout welcomes letters to the editor within our policy. guidelines here. The area adjacent to the Shrine of St. Joseph, across from the famous Surfer statue on West Cliff Drive and across from Lighthouse Field State Beach is the newest location in Santa Cruz potentially facing major changes. Newly proposed for […]]]>

have something to say? Lookout welcomes letters to the editor within our policy. guidelines here.

The area adjacent to the Shrine of St. Joseph, across from the famous Surfer statue on West Cliff Drive and across from Lighthouse Field State Beach is the newest location in Santa Cruz potentially facing major changes.

Newly proposed for a location at 126 Eucalyptus Ave. is a two-story, 76-unit building with an area of ​​74,218 square feet senior housing complex; The site is adjacent to the campus of the Oblates of St. Joseph. Construction costs are expected to be around US$34 million.

As with many recent project proposals in the city of Santa Cruz, the development has met with some, but unclear, public concern. These concerns include the well-known: claims of inadequate public relations, and environmental and transport issues. That development, however, has sparked complaints about high-priced units — those that favor affluent out-of-town retirees over Santa Cruz residents.

The new company represents a scaled-down version of a company that received a lot of feedback two years ago. Santa Cruz City lead planner Clara Stanger said the city first received a preliminary proposal for this project in November 2019, and community meetings followed in March and May 2020.

In March 2020, at a community meeting, about 55 members of the public expressed concerns about the size, traffic, affordability of the units and the environmental impact of the development. Since then, the proposed 100-unit three-story project has shrunk to the current 76-unit two-story plan.

Of the 76 units, 59 would be assisted living units and 15 memory care units, along with two affordable or “inclusive” units. The project – a partnership between the church and a Minnesota-based development company oppidan — Requires approval from the City of Santa Cruz Planning Commission for a number of permits to:

  • reconfigure five lots into two;
  • Demolition of two existing school buildings (formerly Gateway Elementary) totaling 28,417 square feet;
  • remove six old trees;
  • Construction of the facility with associated site improvements.

Oppidan and the city planning staff were originally scheduled to present the project, provide details and answer questions at last Thursday’s planning commission meeting, but the presentation has since been postponed to the October 6 commission meeting due to errors in the public announcement for October 24. September 2018, 1 meeting occurred, according to Stanger.

Dennis Reagan, a longtime Santa Cruz resident who lives on Eucalyptus Avenue, is among those concerned about the project, both in its new and previous iterations. There is currently no official opposition group.

He said he’s concerned by what he perceives as a decline in the city’s commitment to many proposed projects.

“In the past a lot of different groups came together when it came to Gateway, like traffic, but we worked everything out with the Oblates and Gateway because there was a more open relationship,” he said. “Maybe they weren’t always paying attention, but there was more interest in working with the neighborhood.”

“It’s happening all over Santa Cruz, on a number of different projects, and I’m amazed at all of these things that aren’t getting public feedback,” he said. “I don’t know how to phrase it other than ‘secretly’.”

In addition, Reagan has additional environmental concerns.

“They suggest an entrance on Pelton Avenue, which is only 50 or 75 feet from the Monarch [butterfly] reserve,” he said. “They have an entrance on West Cliff, so they should use that one. Having cars in and out all day is not good for that reserve.”

A depiction of the senior housing development proposed for a site across from Lighthouse Field State Beach near the surfer statue on West Cliff Drive in Santa Cruz.

(About the city of Santa Cruz)

Reagan also criticizes the pricing of the development, calling for monthly rates of at least $8,000 and up to $15,000 for unit rental, based on information from a similar facility in Oppidan, Napa.

“Oppidan owns a lot of these properties, and those are the prices I’ve found in Napa,” he said. “This certainly seems to be aimed at wealthier folks out of town. I mean, I certainly couldn’t afford that.”

Overall, Reagan said he sees the benefit of these types of assisted living projects but is dissatisfied with the plans as they stand.

“I think it’s a good project, but it needs to be scaled down and revised,” he said. “It’s not a bad idea, but it’s too big and certainly didn’t get enough input from the public.”

Shannon Rusk, senior vice president of development at Oppidan, said Santa Cruz needs more services like the proposed development.

“Santa Cruz is critically underserved for this type of housing with services for seniors,” she said.

Rusk added that this problem exists will only get worse.

“There is an impending crisis where there will not be enough housing options for seniors in the 75-85 age group,” she said. “We want to improve access to targeted, innovative solutions to this problem.”

Rusk responded to Reagan’s pricing concerns by saying that average total rates, including nursing costs, are the same as similar competitors in the region, about $7,100 to $9,500 per month.

“The deposit or membership fee is usually two months’ rent,” she said. “[Reagan] overestimated profitability a hundredfold.”

Rusk said the designated location is exactly what this project needs.

“This is a perfect place with a perfect opportunity for seniors,” she said. “This will be a quiet, low-traffic development with an overall low impact on the area.”

Lookout contacted the Oblates of Saint Joseph for comment but had received no response as of the time of publication.

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gov. Wolf Announces $4.2 Million in Federal Funding to Protect Diverse Communities Affected by Hate Crimes https://tac-lawna.org/gov-wolf-announces-4-2-million-in-federal-funding-to-protect-diverse-communities-affected-by-hate-crimes/ Fri, 02 Sep 2022 13:32:26 +0000 https://tac-lawna.org/gov-wolf-announces-4-2-million-in-federal-funding-to-protect-diverse-communities-affected-by-hate-crimes/ Governor Tom Wolf announced today that the US Department of Homeland Security, through the Federal Emergency Management Agency, has awarded $4.2 million in Nonprofit Security Grant Program (NSGP) funding to dozens of Pennsylvania nonprofit organizations. “Pennsylvania’s diverse cultural diversity is all too often the target of hate crimes,” Gov. Wolf said. “This $4.2 million federal […]]]>

Governor Tom Wolf announced today that the US Department of Homeland Security, through the Federal Emergency Management Agency, has awarded $4.2 million in Nonprofit Security Grant Program (NSGP) funding to dozens of Pennsylvania nonprofit organizations.

“Pennsylvania’s diverse cultural diversity is all too often the target of hate crimes,” Gov. Wolf said. “This $4.2 million federal investment builds on the more than $15 million I have invested at the state level to protect our people. I hope that one day the kindness of humanity will suffice, but until then we will continue to support and invest in those who face unfair prejudice solely because of their race, religion, disability or sexual orientation.”

More than $250 million was available nationwide through NSGP for fiscal year 2022. gov. Wolf has invested more than $15 million in similar projects across the state Nonprofit Safety Grant Program and has pledged an additional $5 million to be available this fall.

The following organizations received awards from the $4.2 million grant:

Allegheny County

Beth Hamedrash Hagodol-Beth Jacob Ward, $145,900

Chabad Young Professionals Pittsburgh, Inc., $150,000

Rodef Shalom Parish, $125,000

Blair County

Chabad by Altoona, $150,000

Berks County

Christ Episcopal Church Reading, $56,895

Buck’s County

Bensalem Kollel, Synagogue and Outreach Center, $91,366

Center County

Hillel: The Foundation for Jewish Campus Life at Pennsylvania State University, $125,395

County Dauphin

Kesher Israel Congregation, $108,000

Pennsylvania Church Council, $19,891

Erie County

Erie County Inc. Chabad Lubavitch, $150,000

Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine, $46,000

Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine, $49,000

Lackawanna County

Chabad of Abingtons Inc., $150,000

Yeshivath Beth Moshe – The Milton Eisner Yeshiva High School, Inc., $150,000

Lancaster County

Shaarai Shomayim Assembly, $13,732

Temple Beth El, $64,875

Lehigh County

Chabad Lubavitch by Lehigh Valley Inc., $150,000

Canton lucerne

Cheder Menachem Inc., $150,000

Lycoming County

Elimpsort First Baptist Church, $24,999

Monroe County

Camp Dina, $150,000

Camp Dora Golding, $150,000

Congregation Bais Menachem Inc., $150,000

Poconos Inc. Jewish Resource Center, $150,000

Rose Garden Retreats Inc., $150,000

County of Northampton

El Shaddai Assembly of God, $17,920

St. Nicholas Russian Orthodox Church, $61,400

County Perry

Talmudic Properties Penn, Inc., $150,000

Philadelphia County

Parish of Rodeph Shalom, $147,450

Pike County

Camp Gan Israel Northeast, $150,000

Federation of Young Men’s Hebrew Association and Young Women’s Hebrew Association, $150,000

Wayne County

ANPLR, $150,000

Beber Camp Property Inc., $150,000

Camp Ramah in the Poconos, $150,000

Chevra of Jewish War Heroes, $150,000

Federation of Young Men’s Hebrew Association and Young Women’s Hebrew Association, $150,000

Wyoming County

Mesivta Chazak Inc., $150,000

The federal Nonprofit Security Grant Program provides grants to eligible nonprofit organizations that are generally limited to goal hardening and physical security enhancements. The focus is on organizations that are at high risk of a potential terrorist attack.

The program also seeks to integrate nonprofit sector preparedness activities with local and state preparedness efforts while promoting collaboration and coordination of emergency preparedness.

Each year, FEMA issues grant guidelines for this and a variety of other grant programs. For more information, see the FEMA NSGP website.

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Bishop who helped rebuild church in northwest China dies at 91 https://tac-lawna.org/bishop-who-helped-rebuild-church-in-northwest-china-dies-at-91/ Wed, 31 Aug 2022 13:31:02 +0000 https://tac-lawna.org/bishop-who-helped-rebuild-church-in-northwest-china-dies-at-91/ Hong Kong — Bishop John Baptist Ye Ronghua, who led the rebuilding of the Catholic Church in northwest China’s Ankang region, has died at the age of 91. Ucanews.com said Ye died on Aug. 28 from age-related ailments. Ye served as Ankang Diocesan Administrator from 1987 to 2000. He was ordained as the first bishop […]]]>

Hong Kong — Bishop John Baptist Ye Ronghua, who led the rebuilding of the Catholic Church in northwest China’s Ankang region, has died at the age of 91.

Ucanews.com said Ye died on Aug. 28 from age-related ailments.

Ye served as Ankang Diocesan Administrator from 1987 to 2000. He was ordained as the first bishop of Ankang in 2000.

Ye was born on June 6, 1931 in a Catholic family. He studied in seminars run by the Italian Pontifical Institute for Foreign Missions and graduated from the Kaifeng Major Seminary in 1958, ucanews.com reported. His ordination to the priesthood was delayed due to political movements directed against the Church.

The Chinese Communist Party launched a socio-political movement called the Cultural Revolution, which lasted from 1966 to 1976. Ye, not yet ordained, was branded a counter-revolutionary and forced into a labor camp for “re-education.”

Finally, in 1982, at the age of 51, he was ordained a priest after China’s religions were allowed to revive.

During the Cultural Revolution, church property was confiscated, churches destroyed and few priests left.

Bishop Anthony Li Du’an of Xi’an began administering Ankang in 1988. Over a period of 11 years, he ordained nine priests, restored three churches and opened two clinics, ucanews.com reported.

He also ordained Ye as the first Chinese bishop of Ankang on December 10, 2000. The new bishop was recognized by the Chinese government and the Vatican.

Despite his poor health, Ye continued to rebuild and revitalize the local church with a small Catholic congregation. The prefecture often suffered from financial problems.

Most Catholics in the area are farmers, workers, and small business owners, and many people are unemployed and retired. Many families barely earn enough to support themselves and have little financial support for the Church.

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Readers respond to Mormons leaving Oregon for Idaho and Utah https://tac-lawna.org/readers-respond-to-mormons-leaving-oregon-for-idaho-and-utah/ Mon, 29 Aug 2022 20:06:25 +0000 https://tac-lawna.org/readers-respond-to-mormons-leaving-oregon-for-idaho-and-utah/ Last week’s tour of Portland’s most confusing job listings (“catch ghosts,” wwAugust 17th) drew many reactions. But one attribute by far attracted the most curiosity: an item pertaining to the emptying of the Portland Stake Tabernacle of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Telling Saints already exists wwthe second most read story of the year. […]]]>

Last week’s tour of Portland’s most confusing job listings (“catch ghosts,” wwAugust 17th) drew many reactions. But one attribute by far attracted the most curiosity: an item pertaining to the emptying of the Portland Stake Tabernacle of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Telling Saints already exists wwthe second most read story of the year. Maybe that’s because of the church bishop’s rationale for the closure: Mormons are fleeing Oregon. The numbers support his case. Church membership has declined 1.5 percent nationwide over the past two years. “They’re moving to Utah and Idaho,” says Bishop Dave Noble. Here’s what our readers had to say:

Brad Schmidt, via wweek.com: “If the published numbers are correct and Oregon has about 155,000 Mormons, almost all 1.5% of the Exodus would have to occur in the same geographic area to account for the lack of need for a 2,000-seat church. The church official’s explanation appears to be based on tropes currently being promoted by the political right and accepted as truism by those who don’t know any better. Isn’t it likely that a significant portion of the reduced need for chapels is due to Mormons who remain in Portland but simply don’t want to go to church anymore? This would be consistent with larger trends in the US away from organized religion.”

CK, via Twitter: “Just shocking that a conservative bunch would move to more conservative areas. Shocking and unexpected!”

Big cookie, over wweek.com: “LDS authorities keep detailed records, so I’m sure the migration figures are fairly accurate. It’s kind of a who cares story; right or wrong, Portland government values ​​are not consistent with traditional LDS values, so there will be some movement. I also find it interesting that there was no time frame associated with when the stake used to have 2,000 people in attendance. Members I know have not met in person for a reasonable amount of time during the pandemic. Finally, the growth of the LDS Church is trending from outside the United States. This reads like a real estate article to me ww trying to put a political twist on that.”

Joelle Foote, via Facebook: “They pay no taxes and their organization only owns $16 billion worth of land, not to mention the $100 billion in other investments. We need to start taxing all churches and religious organizations.”

Aggieotis, via Reddit: “Church plus parking lot is 43,082 square feet.

“It’s zoned as R5, which means you get four units per 5,000 square foot lot, or six units if you have ADA and affordable units. So you’re looking at eight to nine lots with four to six units. So 35 to 52 units tops. Or at least probably 17 units.

“For the land alone, they want $11.4 million, or $220,000 to $325,000 per unit for the dense four to six units per lot. And $670,000 per unit for something less ambitious. Or a whopping $1.4 million if everyone wants a lot for themselves.

“I think the price is a bit high given the zoning. Despite being in a prime location, unless they can work with the city to reallocate it, the price seems excessive. Could be a great co-op community if done right.”

thenerfviking, via Reddit: “Since a church took over Portland’s historic pro wrestling venue, my vote has been … for dedicating the building to the fine art of sweaty, greasy men doing sweaty, greasy man-hugs.”

FannysForAlgernon, via Reddit: “It’s a residential area, which is a shame. I would love to see this one become a McMenamins. It’s a bit small for their usual facility, but at least better than the little ones around Hawthorne.”

LETTERS to the editor must include the author’s address and phone number for verification. Letters must be 250 or fewer words. Send to: PO Box 10770, Portland OR, 97296 Email: mzusman@wweek.com

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East Suburbs real estate transactions for the week of August 28, 2022 https://tac-lawna.org/east-suburbs-real-estate-transactions-for-the-week-of-august-28-2022/ Sun, 28 Aug 2022 04:01:00 +0000 https://tac-lawna.org/east-suburbs-real-estate-transactions-for-the-week-of-august-28-2022/ chalfant Edward Doheny sold the property at 264 Brighton St. to Jamaal and Amy Loman for $95,000. Churchill Sandra Schreib sold the property at 1611 Branning Road to Bellagia Properties LLC for $90,000. Vincent Pupich III. sold the property at 340 Homer Drive to Tim Schmitt and Rochelle Hawkins for $140,000. edge wood Barbara Razey […]]]>

chalfant

Edward Doheny sold the property at 264 Brighton St. to Jamaal and Amy Loman for $95,000.

Churchill

Sandra Schreib sold the property at 1611 Branning Road to Bellagia Properties LLC for $90,000.

Vincent Pupich III. sold the property at 340 Homer Drive to Tim Schmitt and Rochelle Hawkins for $140,000.

edge wood

Barbara Razey Simmons sold the property at 119 Harlow Street to Roman and Carolyn Beth Taraban for $367,000.

Michael Parker sold the property at 107 McKay St. to David Nathan Pensky and Allison Elisabeth Connell for $350,005.

forest mountains

Ashley Rose Johnson sold the property at 3806 Greensburg Pike to Thomas Richard Pike for $145,000.

Garrett Bonfati sold the lot at 128 Roberta Drive to Patrick and Jacqueline Cohen for $196,000.

Bonnie Alexander’s trustee sold the property on Sumner Ave. 121 for $160,000 to Joseph Readel.

Monroeville

Dale Gensamer sold the Butler Drive property to Keyway Homes East Three LLC in 1985 for $100,000.

Jennifer Scott sold the Butler Drive property to Justine Valenti in 1994 for $150,000.

Charles Marsh sold the property at 331 Coleman Drive to AJC Homes LLC for $165,000.

David Reifenstein sold the property at 409 Eden Drive to Anthony Stizza and Grace Metie for $205,000.

Justin Drish sold the lot at 400 Garden City Drive to Patrick and Lindsey Yarboro for $170,000.

Brady Sean Wonderly sold the property at 244 Lilac Drive to Joseph and Susan Geever for $147,500.

Harry Hilliard sold the property at 872 Patton Street Ext. to RS Holdings 201 LLC for $37,000.

Brian Butti sold the property at 806 Sweetleaf Drive to Ashley Weaver for $252,000.

Oakmont

Brent Massar sold the property at 1067 Fifth St. to Clare Cruz for $200,000.

Danielle Ross sold the lot at 722 Sixth St. to Cassandra Beveridge for $196,000.

Edward Mulvey sold the property on Allegheny Ave. 637 for $350,000 to Mark and Rosemary Studer.

Daniel Nye sold the property at 4 Gloucester Court to Terrence John Franciscus for $165,000.

Richard Grabowski sold the property at 5 Gloucester Court to Ashley Anne Klug for $164,500.

The John Mauro estate sold the lot at 1541 Oak St. to Lauren Michel for $200,000.

Penn Hills

Edyta Szewczyk sold the property at 8242 Aber Road to Benjamin Cramer for $110,000.

Joseph Mazza Jr.’s estate sold the property at 125 Clay Drive to Michael Mears for $150,000.

Joshua Kangas sold the property at 317 Idlewood Road to Steven Ascencio and Sarah Murphy for $159,000.

Donna Dott sold the property at 6212 Lowell Drive to Keyway Homes East Three LLC for $115,000.

Natural Home Solutions LLC sold the property on Maple Ave. 1461 for $185,507 to Joshua Olsen.

Bryan Booth sold the property at 7729 Mark Drive to Hartin Contracting LLC for $40,000.

Kenneth Boeringer estate sold the property on Nash Ave. 1548 for $63,500 to Kenneth Boeringer.

Verum Holdings LLC sold the property at 531 Pennview Drive to Pennview 531 LLC for $152,000.

Theresa Ann Berezanich sold the property at 2729 Race St. to Thomas Alan Berezanich for $85,000.

Jason Carr sold the property at 108 Spring Grove Road to Chasity Clem and Kristy Lumsden for $215,000.

Shelly Graham sold the property at 521 Springdale Drive to Sara Green for $142,000.

Rebecca Lundgren sold the property at 109 University St. to VB One LLC for $65,000.

Troy Jackson sold the property at 5631 Verona Road to Christine Morgan for $144,200.

John Deflavio sold the 110 Windsor Drive property to Kielem Evans for $148,000.

plum

Genevieve Simpson sold the property at 410-412 Barking Road to Thomas and Theresa Berezanich for $30,000.

The estate of Robert Strickler sold the property at 230 Great Smokey Drive to Cody James and Margaret Claire Southerland for $230,000.

Right Real Estate LLC sold the property at 120 Lebeouf Drive to Kimberly Villani for $130,000.

Richard Blauser sold the Leechburg Road property to Consol Mining Co. LLC for $305,000.

The Richard Malon estate sold the lot at 4 Malone St. to Benjamin and Sara Schreckengost for $285,000.

Catherine Foutz sold the property on Millers Lane to Meli Properties LLC for $54,000.

Louis Potochnik Jr. sold the lot at 510 Oblock Ave. for $265,000 to Andrew James McRandal and Hayley Breana Ault.

Bank Of America NA sold the property at 22 Riviera Road to Homestead Horizons LLC for $82,000.

Swissvale

James Archer Jr. sold the 2618 Belmar Pl property to Graves Investment Properties LLC for $53,500.

1106 Rebecca Street LLC sold the property at 7303 Burton St. to Kelly Price for $132,675.

Nakedman Develop LLC sold the property at 100 Jeremiah St. to James Gillen and Natasha Terensky for $305,000.

The Mon Valley Initiative sold the property at 7330 McClure Ave. Unit 2 for $150,000 to Sharareh Kalantar.

Calvin Jackson Jr. sold the property at 7542 Ormond St. to Citylife East LLC for $110,000.

Calvin Jackson Jr. sold the lot on Woodstock Ave. 2232 to Citylife East LLC for $100,000.

Pittsburgh Property Guy LLC sold the property on Woodstock Ave. 2671 to VB One LLC for $87,500.

turtle stream

John English Sr. sold the property on Airbrake Ave. 1223 for $26,000 to Austin and Christian Starr.

James Botti’s trustee sold the property at 326 George St. to Daniel and Weny Lynette Bradley for $100,000.

Compass Savings Bank sold the property at 519 Locust St. to Stephen Lane for $67,000.

Wilkins

Brandon Mattie sold the property at 952 Roland Road to Zane Robert Hinkle and Ali Marie Geyer for $158,000.

Wilkinsburg

Amelia Brusca sold the property at 7291 Beacon Hill Drive to Liron Gitig for $90,000.

Alain Tamonoche sold the property at 921 Belmont St. to Xin Jim and Shanyue Zhao for $53,000.

Jack Kaufmann sold the property at 465 Biddle St. Ubit 5 to Daniel Michael Sotak Jr. and Linda Sotak for $149,900.

Amy Huseman sold the property at 1701 Doyle St. to Gloriii LLC for $72,000.

Ellison Walter Le sold the property at 1500 Foliage St. to Christopher Younger for $5,000.

WF Master REO LLC sold the property at Franklin Ave. 1326 for $25,000 to Linda Ann Banks.

Yalonda Scott sold the property at 922 James St. to Valerie Daun Hamilton for $68,900.

Family Links Inc. sold the property at 501 Kelly Ave. for $358,500 to the CP Development Business Trust.

Monte Bohna sold the property on Mifflin Ave. 822 for $225,000 to Guillaume and Vanessa Buffry.

Lesans Ramsey sold the property at 1619 Mill St. to Penn Pioneer Enterprises LLC for $9,000.

Andrew Venella sold the lot at 831 Savannah Ave. for $375,000 to Nathan and Amy Wharton.

irwin

Jeffrey Tirpak sold the lot at 510 Tenth St. to Nicole Campbell for $206,000.

Murrysville

Michael Hilt sold the property at 3583 Hills Church Road to Joshua and Hilary Kangas for $360,000.

Dennis Casarcia Jr. sold the property at 4305 Michel Ct to Christopher Jaquez Prado and Adzuira Musule Palacios for $783,000.

Sean Falascino sold the property at 3312 N Hills Road to Christina Faggioli for $185,000.

Sean Meehan sold the property at 2212 Woodmont Drive to Hengfeng Ni and Lin Zheng for $320,000.

North Huntingdon

Robert Struhala sold the property at 14860 Baird Ct to Joshua and Hannah Rutter for $106,400.

Bradley Robinson sold the property at 1453 Barry Drive to Robert Kenneth Sanders II for $262,000.

Daniel Markovich sold the lot at 259 Bethel Road to Kingdom Properties South Florida Inc. for $135,000.

John Swanson III sold the property at 10301 Center Highway to Michael Stunja for $95,000.

The estate of Ludmila Doroshkevich sold the property at 180 Christine Drive to Adel Lofty Bebawy Yacouba and Vita Doroshkevich for $180,000.

NVR Inc. sold the property at 7001 Gio Drive to Ryan Josef and Danielle Marie Dinizio for $634,130.

NVR Inc. sold the property at 7106 Gio Drive to Gabriel Lynn Anderson McNeal and Ashley Lorraine Anderson-McNeal for $510,230.

Maronda Homes LLC sold the property at 7873 Isabella Drive to Ryan David and Danielle Cristina Meyers for $356,390.

Matthew Albensi sold the property at 10979 Old Trail Road to Samuel and Danielle Bach for $185,000.

Paul Kerber sold the property at 11679 Parkway Drive to Steffkat Industries LLC for $845,000.

Robert Trisch sold the property at 10030 Piedmont St. to RP Homes 2 LLC for $225,000.

Katelyn Donnelly sold the property at 1168 Richard Road to Russel and Cyrielle Anne Sy for $250,000.

Scott Spillar sold the property at 8479 Walnut St. to Michael Zeckowski for $130,000.

Penn community

Luxor Real Estate LLP sold property at 2000 Augusta Ln to Brittany Lamonna for $260,000.

NVR Inc. sold the property at 1002 Black Sands Drive to Michael Kaye for $715,100.

Blackthorn Resources Group LP sold the property at 1024 Black Sands Drive OG to Olympus Energy LLC for $483,333.

Blackthorn Investors LLC sold the 1090 Blackthorne Drive property to NVR Inc. for $101,000.

Andrew Deutsch sold the property at 1012 Chinaberry Ct to Jeffrey and Elizabeth Tirpak for $345,000.

Glenna Grubb sold the property in Lauffer Ln to Ricky Dennis Goga for $110,000.

Amit Kaura sold the property at 1002 Palm Ct to Holly Marie Nabors for $437,000.

Ragan’s Farms Inc. sold the Richmond Drive property to Benjamin Suchko and Amanda Evans for $134,000.

Michael David Martin Jr. sold the property at 2094 State Route 130 to Gerald Dushack for $78,000.

Donald Dennison sold the property at 110 Thomas St. to James Tobin for $108,000.

Blackthorn Investors LLC sold the 1043 Wedgewood Drive property to NVR Inc. for $73,844.

NVR Inc. sold the property at 1054 Wedgewood Drive to Michael and Kristina Beth Castellani for $499,640.

Real Estate Transactions provided by . Contact at 412-381-3880 or visit www.RealSTATs.net.

Categories:
Local | Monroeville Times Express | Murrysville Star | Norwin Stern | Oakmont | Penn Hill’s Progress | Penn Trafford Star | Plum Advance Leader

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Tom Cruise is reportedly quitting the Church of Scientology, but is that true? https://tac-lawna.org/tom-cruise-is-reportedly-quitting-the-church-of-scientology-but-is-that-true/ Thu, 25 Aug 2022 21:10:00 +0000 https://tac-lawna.org/tom-cruise-is-reportedly-quitting-the-church-of-scientology-but-is-that-true/ Will Tom Cruise split from the Church of Scientology? As reported in this week’s edition of the National InvestigatorCruise is retiring from the controversial religion following its latest scandal. According to the tabloid via Recommend, That 70’s show Actor Danny Masterson is dragging Tom Cruise into legal trouble. In a new court case, Masterson is […]]]>

Will Tom Cruise split from the Church of Scientology? As reported in this week’s edition of the National InvestigatorCruise is retiring from the controversial religion following its latest scandal.

According to the tabloid via Recommend, That 70’s show Actor Danny Masterson is dragging Tom Cruise into legal trouble. In a new court case, Masterson is accused of sexual assault by three women and the Church of Scientology is accused of covering up the crimes. The bad publicity for Cruise’s religion is said to be ruining its success Top Gun: Maverick. In response to the church’s scandals, he has reportedly kept a low profile by selling his US properties and living in London.

Sources told the outlet he could lose his Oscar chances due to his Scientology connection. “The tide has definitely turned against the Church of Scientology,” said an insider. “And because of the longstanding collaboration with Tom Cruise [with Scientology]I don’t think they would ever give him an Oscar.”

There are also reports that Cruise has become so concerned about the impact of Scientology on his career that it worries church leader David Miscavige. “Anything the church or Miscavige can do to make Tom’s life easier will be done,” the source claimed, adding that Cruise is receiving intensive public relations training to deal with the recent crisis.

Although the movie star is unlikely to distance himself from Scientology, there is evidence that Cruise has downplayed his devotion to the organization. Founded in 1953 by science fiction author L. Ron Hubbard, the organization has grown into a PR liability for celebrities like Cruise and John Travolta, who used to be open about their involvement in Scientology.

Corresponding vox, former Scientologists have reported and filed lawsuits accusing Scientology of being an abusive cult that profits from forced labor and human trafficking. Over the years, the church has repeatedly denied financial exploitation or abuse of its members. She claims her critics are involved in religious bigotry and made these claims because they were disgruntled former members.

Cruise’s popularity suffered in the mid-2000s after he publicly revealed details about Scientology and his personal life. He received negative publicity after jumping on Oprah Winfrey’s couch to declare his love for his third wife, Katie Holmes, and their subsequent divorce in 2009. That opened the door for more reports of Cruise’s connections to Scientology and his close friendship with Miscavige, including a 2012 vanity fair Exposé and the book by Lawrence Wright from 2013, Clear.

However, Cruise is currently celebrating a late career comeback. Top Gun: Maverick is a huge success and has received largely positive reviews in the press. Since his days of over-sharing, Cruise has earned a reputation for being fiercely private.

Corresponding vox, his religion and family life are taboo for journalists before agreeing to an interview. Meanwhile, Cruise has continued to make well-received films, such as Tropical Thunder (2008), rock of times (2012), and edge of tomorrow (2014)with the Impossible Mission Franchise continues to produce smash hits.

Despite this, Cruise has maintained a successful career throughout Scientology’s myriad controversies. Celebrities like Cruise and Travolta often credit the group for their notable achievements. Plus, Cruise stayed loyal even at the lowest stages of his career, so it’s unlikely he would consider leaving at one of the highest stages.

As for Cruise’s prospects, the actor has received three Academy Award nominations as a public, practicing Scientologist. Corresponding Vanity Fairs Katey Rich, there are serious talks about his performance top gun could be nominating him for an Academy Award for the first time in more than 20 years.

Nonetheless, Rich cautions that an Oscars campaign could be daunting for an actor long “protected by his tower of mega-fame and Scientology.” “It’s one thing for Cruise to board an aircraft carrier or hold court in front of a crowd in Cannes and quite another to open up to the kind of profiles or roundtable discussions that are ubiquitous in modern Oscar campaigns said Rich.

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Safety concerns related to children’s toys left in yards, driveways and sidewalks https://tac-lawna.org/safety-concerns-related-to-childrens-toys-left-in-yards-driveways-and-sidewalks/ Tue, 23 Aug 2022 01:41:52 +0000 https://tac-lawna.org/safety-concerns-related-to-childrens-toys-left-in-yards-driveways-and-sidewalks/ By MARK DEVOLDERLos Alamos Some children in Los Alamos County leave their toys scattered in yards and driveways or on sidewalks to homes and sidewalks around the county. There are some security issues associated with this practice: A motorist might back up over a child or toy in a driveway; Pedestrians (including Federal Express and […]]]>

By MARK DEVOLDER
Los Alamos

Some children in Los Alamos County leave their toys scattered in yards and driveways or on sidewalks to homes and sidewalks around the county.

There are some security issues associated with this practice:

  1. A motorist might back up over a child or toy in a driveway;
  2. Pedestrians (including Federal Express and UPS personnel delivering packages) may have trouble walking around toys left on a sidewalk. and
  3. LAFD personnel attending to an apartment fire at night may trip over a toy in the dark.

There are other problems too. Children can use their toys on the street or play different kinds of games on the street. Motorists are trained to watch for balls on roads because a child might suddenly run out to get a ball.

Children attend school and are not allowed to leave coats, backpacks, iPhones and other items in random places. The aisles between desks in schools must be kept clear to avoid trip hazards. Teachers can walk around the classrooms to monitor student behavior. Children may suddenly become ill and need to go to a toilet. School corridors are to be kept clear for evacuation purposes. And unfortunately, we live in an era of school shootings.

Children grow into adults and have the same problems with adult toys. When children are properly trained in how to handle, care for, maintain and store their toys, these productive behaviors can carry over into adulthood.

There are a variety of problems encountered with toys.

How these issues are addressed directly affects how similar issues are managed as children grow into adults:

  1. Toys become contaminated with a variety of substances such as chemicals, dirt, food scraps, melted crayons, food coloring, self-adhesive labels, sticky substances such as glue, etc. Cleaning these materials from toy surfaces can be difficult. Stains may remain on the toy. Many toys contain batteries. Batteries can degrade over time and corrode the internal surfaces of toys. Sometimes the toys cannot be saved and have to be disposed of;
  2. Toys are often made up of components (parts) and are in kit form. Often an important part can be lost. If an important part is lost or a significant number of parts are lost (e.g. pieces of a puzzle), the toy is often beyond salvage. The parts may not even be useful for repairing the same or a similar toy;
  3. Toys or toy parts can be damaged. Dogs that snag toys will chew on the toy and leave teeth marks on soft objects like Barbie dolls. Damaged toys or toy parts can often be repaired. However, the resulting toy may be in poor condition. This raises the question of what a child might want to acquire and play with such a toy in the future. However, there are children who are so poor that any toy in any condition could still be a treasure. Some kids in northern New Mexico get nothing for Christmas. Therefore, a usable toy might still be desirable;
  4. Garbage bags with used toys, toy parts, last year’s Christmas waste, etc. are available at the flea market. Unfortunately, many items are in poor condition, missing parts and parts, dirty and/or stained with impurities. Some of the toys and toy parts cannot be repaired or reused and end up in the Los Alamos Ecostation, where the material causes an environmental problem. This is especially true for electronic toys that contain circuit boards, lead solder, toxic semiconductor materials and toxic nickel-cadmium batteries. Discarded electronic toys that no longer work go to the Los Alamos Ecostation electronic waste. and
  5. In addition to lost or damaged parts, many discarded toys do not have the original packaging or instructions. If a Lego kit does not include a picture/drawing of the original kit item or building instructions, it will be difficult to create a finished toy item. Mixing parts from four or five Lego kits creates something that cannot be built into anything resembling the individual kits. Therefore, the articles may be useless.

Recommendation: Children must be taught not to tear toys apart. In addition, toys that come in kit form must be kept in some form of container (preferably in the original toy container along with the building instructions). A good alternative is to place toys/toy parts or toy kit parts from a specific toy in a plastic bag and seal the bag with a zip tie. It’s not a good idea to put toys in an open box, as small parts tend to spill out of the corners or bottom of the box. However, it’s a good idea to store bags of toys in some sort of box. This isn’t rocket science and doesn’t take much time. Taking care of a toy is a good teaching tool and creates more powerful children and adults. It is also an environmentally sound practice.

Recommendation: Clean and usable toys can be donated to thrift stores. It may not help to put usable toys in the Ecostation reuse area, as the toys may be discarded after a few days. The United Church at Los Alamos also has regular sales for a variety of toys.

Recommendation: Batteries that have exceeded their useful life must be removed from the toy and disposed of according to the instructions on the batteries. There is a nickel cadmium battery disposal area at the Los Alamos Ecostation. Alkaline batteries can be disposed of in the green garbage can as normal garbage.

Toys require some guidance on the Harassment Code/other guidance:

  1. Is it acceptable to scatter toys randomly in yards and driveways or on walkways to homes and sidewalks in the county?
  2. What is the definition of a toy (e.g., tricycles, bicycles, go-karts, two-wheeled and four-wheeled vehicles, all-terrain vehicles (ATVs), scooters, small motorcycles/mini-bikes, skateboards, rollerblades, plastic parts?) – school toys, plastic and metal / tonka- push-type toys, remote control (RC) cars, electronic toys, dart boards, various types of balls, pogo sticks, dolls, stuffed animals, small paddling pools, large plastic doll houses, etc.) ?
  3. Some owners also have trampolines in the garden. During a recent storm, an unanchored trampoline blew up on San Ildefonso;
  4. If toys are left in the yard and a neighborhood child decides to play with the toy, the toy owner may be liable if the child is injured. The law makes exceptions for children entering residential property—particularly if the property appears attractive to the child or a fun place to play;
  5. There is also the possibility of an increase in home insurance rates if a child or person is injured;
  6. A pet can get tangled or caught in some toy;
  7. Children can drown in a 5-gallon bucket of water; and
  8. Children can choke when playing with a plastic dry cleaning bag. (Note: I know of two children who died this way and the effect on the father was devastating.)

I don’t think the toy issue needs to be criminalized, but it does require some attention. Perhaps a courtesy note is required and nothing more.

Recommendation: I think it is appropriate for children to collect their toys when they are done playing or using them. It would help if the toy is kept near a house (e.g. near the porch of a house, near a house wall, etc.). Call it a toy parking lot if you like.

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