Church Properties – TAC Lawna http://tac-lawna.org/ Sat, 15 Jan 2022 14:32:40 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://tac-lawna.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-11-150x150.png Church Properties – TAC Lawna http://tac-lawna.org/ 32 32 Local Heroes by Gregg Motley https://tac-lawna.org/local-heroes-by-gregg-motley/ Sat, 15 Jan 2022 14:32:40 +0000 https://tac-lawna.org/local-heroes-by-gregg-motley/ Gregg Bunt. President of Regional Economic Development, Inc. Submitted photo. In previous columns I have mentioned the importance of leadership as a critical ingredient in the success of a community, and we have a number of men and women in our county who are leaders. The citizens, whom I consider heroic, invest much of their […]]]>
Gregg Bunt. President of Regional Economic Development, Inc. Submitted photo.

In previous columns I have mentioned the importance of leadership as a critical ingredient in the success of a community, and we have a number of men and women in our county who are leaders. The citizens, whom I consider heroic, invest much of their time, talent and wealth into our community. Here are some projects that I consider particularly important:

Sleep Inn. Funded largely by local investors, this project enhanced a corner entrance to Fort Scott and our historic district. It also gave us a newer hospitality facility that leaves many of our visitors with a positive impression of our community.

Fort Scott ammunition. This was a large investment by a local family in another run down property at the entrance to Fort Scott. While they use the property extensively, they may never get back all the money they invested in the property to make it usable.

Hole in the wall. Yes, this project had some public funding, but local investors took a chance and developed an attractive building from an eyesore across from the National Historical Site. Remember the concrete blocks and poles on Scott Avenue?

E3/Common Reasons. A local couple poured a large sum of money into this project, restoring a key intersection in the historic district and drawing several new companies into the development.

Sharkys and Luthers. This investment in a downtown building and the leasing of another important landmark has created an attractive meeting place for locals and tourists alike.

Bandera stone. This Bourbon County company announced a new showroom location in Uniontown. This is a much needed investment in the west of our county.

milk queen. Another local couple is making a big investment to build a brand new building in South Main accessible to many just passing through. Our county has realized a nice increase in sales tax collection at the expense of this couple’s increased overhead.

vortex street. Two locals bought some derelict lots on the 300 block west of the Presbyterian Church and built two new homes that will add significant value to the neighborhood. About two years after construction, the men sold the land at a loss. Heroically they started the project, not to make money, but to make our community a better place.

Action team Good Neighborhood. This group of community leaders has made countless personal investments in Bourbon County communities, usually under the radar. Yard cleans, paint jobs, wheelchair ramps and other community improvements have been completed dozens of times by these generous Bourbon County stars.

The list goes on. Investments like these by locals are the lifeblood of our community and represent commitments that go beyond the call of duty. Another goal of Bourbon County REDI is to facilitate future investments like this across our county, not just from local heroes and heroines, but from newcomers as well.

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Gov. Hochul announces nearly $1 billion in funding for affordable housing https://tac-lawna.org/gov-hochul-announces-nearly-1-billion-in-funding-for-affordable-housing/ Thu, 13 Jan 2022 21:13:00 +0000 https://tac-lawna.org/gov-hochul-announces-nearly-1-billion-in-funding-for-affordable-housing/ Governor Kathy Hochul announced today that $991 million in bonds and grants has been awarded to create or maintain 3,242 affordable, sustainable and supportive homes across the state. The developments will mobilize an additional $379 million in private funds to create a total investment of nearly $1.4 billion to advance local economic development efforts, reduce […]]]>

Governor Kathy Hochul announced today that $991 million in bonds and grants has been awarded to create or maintain 3,242 affordable, sustainable and supportive homes across the state. The developments will mobilize an additional $379 million in private funds to create a total investment of nearly $1.4 billion to advance local economic development efforts, reduce homelessness and New York’s commitment to expanding safe and healthy housing opportunities promote for individuals and families.

“The need for affordable and supportive housing has been exacerbated throughout New York by the pandemic, and it is important that we take the necessary steps to ensure every New Yorker has a roof over their heads.” said Governor Hochul. “These awards address this issue at its core by supporting the creation of quality housing that keeps people safe, brings new businesses and jobs to our communities, and improves access to the essential services that enable people to build a fuller life.”

Today’s announcement is part of Governor Hochul’s far-reaching plans to make housing more affordable, equitable and stable. This includes a proposal for a new $25 billion five-year housing plan that will create and sustain an additional 100,000 affordable housing in urban and rural areas throughout New York, including 10,000 with support services that increase new housing construction and tackle inequalities in housing market.

The funding is made possible through a Fall 2021 bond issuance by New York State Homes and Community Renewal, which provided $785 million in taxable and tax-exempt housing bonds and $206 million in grant funding through various programs that aim to develop and maintain affordable housing.

Awards include:

NYC

$262 million for Phase 1a of the six-phase redevelopment of the 27-acre Brooklyn Developmental Center in East New York. Phase 1a will consist of 450 affordable homes, including 132 homes with supporting services. As part of the state’s $1.4 billion Vital Brooklyn Initiative, the development aims to address chronic disparities in access to health care, housing and services in central Brooklyn neighborhoods. The 15-story building will include a 15,000-square-foot medical clinic and nearly 8,000-square-foot retail space on the ground floor. The all-electric design includes many sustainable features such as geothermal and solar panels on the roof, and offers free WiFi to all residents. The development team includes L+M Partners and Services for the UnderServed.

$101 million for 475 Bay Street on Staten Island. The 12-story building will contain 270 apartments, including 138 houses reserved for the homeless or to house insecure seniors who have access to supportive services provided by Self Help for Independent Living. The building, located within the Staten Island Downtown Revitalization Initiative strategic area, will also include 10,000 square feet of retail space on the ground floor. Developer is BFC Partners.

$60 million for Edgemere Commons A1 in Far Rockaway, Queens. The 17-story building will provide 194 homes, including 29 supportive homes for people with intellectual or developmental disabilities and 30 supportive homes for homeless adults. The development will also include 23,000 square feet of ground floor retail space for use by a grocery store and other businesses. Edgemere Commons is an 11-phase mixed-use community that will eventually include over 2,000 affordable homes, medical facilities and commercial space. Edgemere Commons is developed by The Arker Companies.

Western New York

$27 million for Pilgrim Village Senior in Buffalo. The existing Pilgrim Village Senior residential complex will be demolished and replaced with a single four-storey building containing 105 apartments for adults aged 55 and over. Forty-nine apartments are reserved for seniors who need supportive services to live independently. The development includes 20,000 square meters of green space with walkways, seating areas and gardens. The developer is Stuart Alexander and Associates, Inc.

$38 million for Buffalo’s Pilgrim Village Family. Adjacent to Pilgrim Village Senior, this section of the development will offer 132 affordable apartments in a single five-story building. Common rooms and commercial areas are to be created on the ground floor. Pilgrim Village Family and Senior are both adjacent to the Buffalo Niagara Medical Campus. The developer is Stuart Alexander and Associates, Inc.

$38 million for McCarley Gardens Apartments in Buffalo. The project will refurbish 21 existing townhouses and construct four additional buildings for a total of 149 affordable apartments. The existing apartments will be upgraded to be more energy efficient with improved insulation, new windows and replacement boilers and water heaters. Site work will enhance the 15-acre property, located in a growing downtown neighborhood near the Buffalo Niagara Medical Campus. The developers are BFC Partners and St. John’s Baptist Church.

$96 million for the rehabilitation and preservation of four multi-family homes in the city of Amherst, Erie County. The projects include Princeton Court with 304 apartments, Brewster Mews with 216 apartments, Parkside Houses with 180 apartments and Oxford Village Townhomes with 316 apartments. The developers for the four properties are The Related Companies and MJ Peterson Real Estate Corporation.

Mid-Hudson

$43 million for Hudson Hill in Yonkers. The project involves the demolition and replacement of a dilapidated building with a new six-story building containing 113 affordable apartments. 45 apartments will be reserved for homeless households in need of support services. The all-electric building with solar panels on the roof was funded by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority’s Building of Excellence program. Developer and service provider is Westhab, Inc.

$14 million for Tall Oaks Apartments in Middletown, Orange County. The project will refurbish 150 apartments in 16 buildings. Originally built as a Mitchell Lama in 1973, the scope of work includes the renovation of all apartments, new roofing, solar panel installation and exterior improvements. Developer is The Related Companies.

$200 million in taxable and tax-exempt bonds for 500 Main Street in New Rochelle, Westchester County. The mixed-income development will construct 477 new homes, with 119 units affordable at up to 60 percent of the area’s median income. Developer is the BRP Development Corporation.

Capital District

$25 million for Yates Village Phase II in Schenectady. This is the second and final phase of the redevelopment of the Yates Village public housing complex, originally constructed in 1948. Phase II involves the replacement of six outdated buildings with 37 new two-story buildings containing 68 apartments on a more walkable and attractive campus. The development team includes Pennrose Holdings, LLC, Duvernay + Brooks, LLC and the Schenectady City Housing Authority.

Mohawk Valley

$41 million for Stone Ridge in the village of Herkimer, Herkimer County. The project will rehabilitate 153 social housing units in five different locations in the village’s downtown area. Three existing buildings will be renovated, one property will be demolished and a new building with 24 apartments will be built. The developer is Herkimer Affordable Housing, Inc., the not-for-profit arm of the Herkimer Housing Authority.

finger lakes

$30 million to renovate and maintain affordability eight separate developments in Livingston, Monroe and Orleans counties. The eight properties owned and developed by PathStone Corporation total 203 affordable homes. Rehabilitation work varies according to need.

north country

$16 million for the Woodcreek Apartments in Gouverneur, St. Lawrence County and the Bateman Apartments in Lowville, Lewis County. Two existing settlements in neighboring districts are being renovated. Originally built as a hotel in 1869, the Bateman Apartments were converted into affordable housing in 1991 and offer 24 apartments and four commercial premises. Originally constructed as Section 801 military housing, Woodcreek Apartments comprises 96 apartments in 30 buildings. The developer is the Baldwin Real Estate Development Corporation.

RuthAnne Visnauskas, Commissioner for Home and Community Renewal, said: “HCR is proud to be at the forefront of Governor Hochul’s mission to create and sustain affordable housing opportunities throughout New York. This $991 million investment will fund the construction of new homes in growing downtown areas with access to public transportation and services, and make life-enhancing improvements to existing developments, including public housing. From Staten Island to St. Lawrence County, these 14 projects will ultimately Contributing more than $1 billion to the economy to benefit thousands of individuals and families in urban, suburban and rural communities while demonstrating our commitment to building a greener, healthier and more equitable future for our state.”

State Senator Brian Kavanagh, chairman of the Senate Housing Committee, said: “I applaud Governor Kathy Hochul and Commissioner RuthAnne Visnauskas for receiving this important funding to create and maintain affordable and sustainable housing across the state. While much more needs to be done to increase the state’s affordable housing stock, this investment will go a long way in helping revitalize neighborhoods and strengthen local communities’ economies. It is also noteworthy that many of these projects are being developed in accordance with the state’s green building standards and environmental sustainability goals.”

Rep. Steven Cymbrowitz, chairman of the Assembly’s Housing Committee, said: “These 14 HCR bond-funded projects will provide safe, affordable, and supportive housing to thousands of individuals and families across the state at risk of homelessness, as well as seniors and people with disabilities who benefit from local support services. Our work to create and sustain affordable housing continues, but every unit we build brings stability and hope to another important member of our community. I commend Governor Hochul for her commitment to expanding safe and affordable housing options for our residents.”

]]> Methadone Clinic moves to Newhallville https://tac-lawna.org/methadone-clinic-moves-to-newhallville/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 21:04:38 +0000 https://tac-lawna.org/methadone-clinic-moves-to-newhallville/ By Thomas Breen, Independent of New Haven January 11, 2022 Marcus Pearson of Elizabeth Street at 794 Dixwell: Methadone Clinic relocation is “a good idea” for neighbors in need of treatment. Find out what’s happening inside New port with free real-time updates from patch. A methadone clinic and nonprofit health care company plan to move […]]]>

By Thomas Breen, Independent of New Haven

January 11, 2022

Marcus Pearson of Elizabeth Street at 794 Dixwell: Methadone Clinic relocation is “a good idea” for neighbors in need of treatment.

Find out what’s happening inside New port with free real-time updates from patch.

A methadone clinic and nonprofit health care company plan to move from Long Wharf to Newhallville after purchasing a former middle school building on Dixwell Avenue for $ 2.45 million.

This is one of the latest local real estate transactions in the city as recorded in the New Haven Land Registry database. (The full list of transactions appears later in this story.)

Find out what’s happening inside New port with free real-time updates from patch.

December 14th APT Foundation Inc. bought the two story brick school building on Dixwell Ave. 794 – along with eight smaller adjoining lots with parking lots on Dixwell Avenue, Elizabeth Street, and Cherry Ann Street – from Elm City College Preparatory Inc. for $ 2.45 million.

The City of New Haven and the City of Hamden (the lots in question are on the parish line with the former school building on the New Haven side) last valued these nine lots at a total of $ 8,338,600.

The school building, built in 1931, last housed half of the Elm City College Preparatory Middle School. The Achievement First Network Charter School moved to Fair Haven The board voted in 2019 to save money, sell the Newhallville building, and consolidate the seventh and eighth graders with the rest of the school’s K-6 students on James Street.

Lynn Madden, president and CEO of the APT Foundation, told the Independent in a recent telephone interview that her nonprofit – which specializes in treating people with opioids, alcohol and other substances – is planning to expand its outpatient medical services and administrative offices to move from their currently rented premises to 1 Long Wharf Dr. to 794 Dixwell Ave.

Moving from rented premises to a building owned by the APT Foundation will be “a lot cheaper and more patient-friendly because we can design” [the space] to meet our patient care needs, “said Madden.

“Moving out of 1 Long Wharf is part of our long-term strategic plan to truly own what we use for patient care.” She said APT was “looking for real estate”. [to buy] in New Haven for several years. “

The property sale and proposed move mean the APT Foundation will move an outpatient methadone clinic currently treating 395 patients with opioid use disorders from Long Wharf to Newhallville.

Methadone is an “opioid agonist” approved by the state for the treatment of people who are addicted to heroin and other similar drugs and “reduces craving and withdrawal from opioids and makes opioids less effective or less effective”. according to the Federal Drug Abuse and Mental Health Agency. The APT Foundation has been running a long-term –and controversial– Methadone Clinic on Congress Avenue in the Hill.

“We have a primary care unit that would provide all of your typical medical services,” said Madden of the types of services the APT Foundation plans to move to 794 Dixwell.

This includes checking for a sore throat or doing a physical exam; Provision of “Medicines for Opioid Use Disorders”; Providing medication for psychiatric illness; and in some cases “intensive outpatient services” where a patient would spend up to nine hours per week on site. She said 794 Dixwell Ave. will not offer inpatient medical services.

“Small numbers of people receiving methadone” will be moved to the new location in Newhallville, Madden said, referring to the 395 patients currently receiving methadone at 1 Long Wharf Dr.

It is “by far our smallest methadone treatment program,” she said, which accounts for about a third of the number of methadone patients treated at the Congress Avenue site.

Madden also said the 395 methadone patients whose care is being relocated from Long Wharf to Newhallville “we believe are the most stable patients” treated by APT, as opposed to those treated at the Hill site who typically are treated by APT. news [methadone] Patients. “She added that 292 of these 395 patients only come to the APT Foundation for treatment once a month.

Overall, she said, the 1 Long Wharf site looks like Dr. the APT Foundation as a whole – not just the methadone treatment program – currently has about 100 patients per day. “Many of our services are walk-in services,” she said. “We hope we’ll see the same people” when the clinic moves to 794 Dixwell, Newhallville.

Madden said the APT Foundation plans to undertake “significant renovations” of the newly acquired Dixwell Avenue property to convert it into a medical supply and office building. She said APT plans to conduct a site map review in front of the City Planning Commission in February of the proposed renovation, which should not include the demolition of any part of the existing structure. “We mainly work with what exists,” she said.

When the transition is complete, approximately 80 employees – including clinical providers and the entire APT central administration team – will move to the new location in Newhallville.

Neighborhood treatment required

Madden was asked how the APT Foundation wants to be a good neighbor for the surrounding Newhallville community, given the intense impact a methadone clinic can have on a neighborhood.

Hill neighbors have criticized the APT Foundation in recent years for allowing loitering, substance abuse, and dangerous and illegal activity off its premises on Congress Avenue. APT responded by increasing security at this Hill site and arguing for the importance of supporting drug treatment programs as an opioid epidemic ravages the country.

“The city urgently needs these services,” said Madden of the methadone clinic’s move to Newhallville.

She said the APT Foundation has offered this type of treatment for more than 50 years. “Virtually all of the people who regularly attend services at 1 Long Wharf are residents of or near New Haven,” she said.

“We strive to provide people with safe, evidence-based treatment and we have done so at all of our locations.”

She added that the people receiving treatment are generally not the biggest problems for a neighborhood. “Often times, people who have difficulties in the community could not be treated.”

Elizabeth Street resident Marcus Pearson welcomed the news that a methadone clinic has moved to the neighborhood.

“I think that’s a good idea,” he said as he walked down the block towards Dixwell Avenue near the abandoned former school building. “There are definitely a lot of people here with drugs” and addiction problems, he said.

It’s not just unique to Newhallville, he added. “You see it all over New Haven.” He said having a treatment facility that helps people overcome opioid addiction is a plus.

Pearson said that Elizabeth Street has long been a good place to live. “This is a good road,” he said. He said that many of the block’s residents own their own homes, which gives it a sense of stability and neighborhood cohesion.

Newhallville Alder Devin Avshalom-Smith, who represents the ward to which 794 Dixwell Ave. Heard told the Independent that it did not have enough information about the APT Foundation’s proposed move to make an overly detailed comment.

He said the phone call and request for comment from the independent was the first time he heard of APT’s plans to acquire and move land. (In fact, during her telephone interview with this reporter, Madden told the Independent that “we haven’t really done too much” community work in Newhallville about APT’s plans. She said her organization had a “preliminary talk” planned with the city map department, to talk about the renovation project before doing the site plan review.)

“I look forward to working with you,” said Avshalom-Smith of the APT Foundations. “Tons of people [in the neighborhood] need treatment for substance abuse. It is a service that must be provided. But I find it difficult to say anything [else about APT’s plans]have no further information. “

The state and the country have seen a sharp rise in opioid overdoses and deaths since the Covid-19 pandemic began .

Despite that surge, Madden told the Independent, the APT Foundation has not seen an increase in patient counts since Covid-19 began.

“From what we can tell, our patients and staff are doing really well,” she said, despite the challenges of continuing to come to work and receive treatment during a global pandemic.

She said the APT Foundation focused during this time on educating its patients about the dangers of fentanyl, distributing reverse overdose treatments like naloxone, providing masks, and providing Covid-19 vaccinations (the APT Foundation has a vaccination mandate for their Employees) and to “pay close attention to the vulnerability of our patients and our employees”.

Summary of recent property sales

In other recent local real estate transactions:

• On December 10, downtown biopharmaceutical company Biohaven purchased the Quinnipiack Club building at 221 Church St. and an adjacent parking lot at 208 Orange St. from 221 Church Street LLC of Chalres Noble III for 4.1 million U.S. dollar. The Church Street property was last sold for $ 1,940,000 in 2010, and the city has valued the two lots at a total of $ 5,736,700. click here for a full story on this sale.

• On November 30, the Quincy, Massachusetts-based holding company HIPCF I New Haven LLC, which is controlled by The Grossman Companies, purchased the single-story medical office building at 137 Water St. from Michael Santoro’s Phoenix Realty Development LLC for $ 4.3 million Dollar. The property was last sold for $ 970,000 in 2008, and the city last valued the property at $ 3,275,300.

• On December 18, a Torrington-based company called O&G Industries Inc., controlled by Gregory Oneglia, Kenneth Merz, and David Oneglia, purchased the single-story industrial building at 424 Grand Ave. from Robert Feckes Reclamation Realty LLC for $ 2,175,000. The property was last sold for $ 230,000 in 2003, and the city last valued it at $ 972,700.

• Ocean Management partners donated $ 740,000 to purchase a four-family home at 220 Fitch St., a single-family home at 210 Fitch St., a single-family home at 202 Fitch St., and vacant lot at 216 Fitch St. Brian from treasure. The city last valued these four properties at a total of $ 732,000.


The New Haven Independentis a non-profit, daily news site founded in 2005.

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Metro Roundup: The Plan to Save Camp Hargis https://tac-lawna.org/metro-roundup-the-plan-to-save-camp-hargis/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 02:23:26 +0000 https://tac-lawna.org/metro-roundup-the-plan-to-save-camp-hargis/ Aaron Knight shared his journey to the rescue of Hargis Retreat while speaking with the Chelsea Business Alliance at the January 5th meeting. Knight’s family has a long history in Chelsea, starting with his uncle moving to Chelsea in 1936 and buying 200 acres near Hargis Retreat. Knight moved here in 1975 when she was […]]]>

Aaron Knight shared his journey to the rescue of Hargis Retreat while speaking with the Chelsea Business Alliance at the January 5th meeting.

Knight’s family has a long history in Chelsea, starting with his uncle moving to Chelsea in 1936 and buying 200 acres near Hargis Retreat. Knight moved here in 1975 when she was 2 years old. His uncle helped start the Chelsea water company and also owned a shop at Old US 280, and his cousin has owned an excavation company for several years, so his family has had a business in Chelsea for nearly 100 years.

Knight recounted how he went down the wrong path as a teenager, and by the time he was 16 found himself without a home, spending his last two years at Chelsea High School in 25 different locations and going to jail eight times before that, turning 18 Year old. He graduated from Chelsea High School in 1991 and left town to start over in the Hueytown area, but continued to use and trade drugs.

When he was 30 years old, he said he felt the Holy Spirit moved him to change his life. Three months after a car accident, Knight preached in Bessemer City Jail, where he served every Sunday for about six years.

After a divorce at the age of 38, Knight moved back to Chelsea in 2010 to start over. In 2021 he met his wife Kelly and she led him back to God. She encouraged him to attend a local Bible school, and he began volunteering at a local church to keep it going. After a merger with another church failed, he was asked to work as a pastor in what is now Redemption Church. After almost six years, the church has grown from 40 to around 300.

Growing up near Hargis Retreat, it has always been a place Knight has loved. When he found out the camp was for sale in 2019 he thought it was going to be developed and was hoping to get a small piece of land to build a house, but instead God told him to save the camp instead.

“I fought it a bit at first and finally told the Lord that if you open a few doors and help me and show me you’re there, I’ll walk that thing,” he said.

He decided to email Doug Eddleman of Eddleman Properties in April 2019 but received no response. In July, he drove to his office hoping to meet with him, but could not and left dejected. He continued to go to his office every other week for the next 11 months, and Eddleman reached out to him in May 2020. After discussion, he found that the price of the camp was $ 2.2 million.

After a few more months, Knight found that a payment of $ 195,000 was required by December 31st and began reaching out to the Chelsea business owners with a handwritten letter. Donations were received, and on December 31st, Knight Eddleman picked up a check for $ 196,000, a thousand dollars over what was needed, and a day early.

“We actually raised $ 235,000 in 30 days, but that’s just the beginning,” he said. “We’ll still have to raise $ 1 million in 2022 and $ 1 million in 2023, but I’m not in the least concerned about that. I know that God is in it and he will do it. ”

To raise the money, he plans to apply for grants and sell a large piece of land. His wife is working on summer camp plans. A fundraising campaign for 2022 called Save the Camp is about to start, along with other plans like a silent auction, a polar jump, and other things to help promote the camp.


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Persecution of Jehovah’s Witnesses sponsored by the Russian government is picking up again https://tac-lawna.org/persecution-of-jehovahs-witnesses-sponsored-by-the-russian-government-is-picking-up-again/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 10:44:00 +0000 https://tac-lawna.org/persecution-of-jehovahs-witnesses-sponsored-by-the-russian-government-is-picking-up-again/ After a period of freedom after the collapse of the Soviet Union, Jehovah’s Witnesses in Russia are once again facing intense, state-sponsored persecution. Since a Supreme Court ruled the Jehovah’s Witnesses Administrative Center as an extremist organization in 2017, the group has been stripped of its legal status. Many of his places of worship, known […]]]>

After a period of freedom after the collapse of the Soviet Union, Jehovah’s Witnesses in Russia are once again facing intense, state-sponsored persecution.

Since a Supreme Court ruled the Jehovah’s Witnesses Administrative Center as an extremist organization in 2017, the group has been stripped of its legal status. Many of his places of worship, known as Kingdom Halls, have been confiscated.

Individual witnesses are treated as enemies of the state.

According to Jarrod Lopes, a New York-based spokesman for the global organization, 77 Jehovah’s Witnesses were in Russian prisons for practicing their beliefs and another 31 were under house arrest at the end of the year.

Many others have been targeted. In the past five years, a total of 1,660 homes have been searched, Lopes said.

A ruling by the Russian Supreme Court showed that individual or collective worship by Jehovah’s Witnesses is not in itself a crime.

It is unclear how this ruling will affect those currently awaiting trial, Lopes said.

In November, a court in Vladivostok – some 8,500 kilometers east of Moscow – acquitted Dmitry Barmakin of organizing extremist group activities. The Jehovah’s Witness simply “exercised the right to religious freedom enshrined in the Russian constitution”.

Other defendants have been less successful, Lopes said.

“Jehovah’s Witnesses continue to be condemned and condemned as extremists, which puts them on a par with terrorists like al-Qaeda,” he said.

The persecution, Lopes said, is unjustified.

There is nothing criminal, Lopes argues, to read the Bible, sing songs and pray.

“In a criminal case, you often try to investigate who was injured as a result [defendant]”he said.” In this case, they have no victims because none of these people get hurt. “

In 2016, there were around 171,000 Jehovah’s Witness “publishers” in Russia, people in good standing who actively share their faith.

Church officials said a total of 321 church-related properties worth $ 53 million were seized.

In April, the US Commission on International Religious Freedom asked the US State Department to classify Russia as a country of particular concern because it committed or tolerated “particularly serious violations of religious freedom”.

Under the International Religious Freedom Act, countries qualify for the list if they have “systematic, ongoing, [and] egregious offenses … including offenses such as – (A) torture or cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment; (B) prolonged detention without charge; (C) causing the disappearance of people by kidnapping or secretly detaining them; or (D) some other blatant denial of the right to life, liberty, or security of persons. “

In November, Foreign Minister Anthony Blinken added Russia to the list, placing it alongside Burma, China, Eritrea, Iran, North Korea, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Tajikistan and Turkmenistan.

James Carr, a Searcy man on the commission, was taken aback by Moscow’s treatment of Jehovah’s Witnesses, finding that they make up a fraction of 1% of the country’s population.

The former superpower now has an estimated 146 million inhabitants.

“Here’s a powerful force: Russia … and for some reason they’re scared of these people,” said Carr.

“I don’t know many members of the Jehovah’s Witnesses faith, but I know enough to know that they are quite peaceful people. And they are put in jail just for practicing their beliefs, ”he said.

The convicts could be jailed “not for six months, but in some cases for many, many years,” he added.

With 8.6 million Jehovah’s Witnesses around the world, they are a global force. While they refer to Jesus as the founder of their organization, they say the modern movement arose out of a small group of what called themselves Bible Students who lived near Pittsburgh in the late 19th century.

They have referred to themselves as Jehovah’s Witnesses since 1931.

They are taught to be respectful of political authorities.

In the New World Translation of the Bible that Witnesses use and distribute, they are instructed to “obey governments and authorities, to be ready for any good work, … to be reasonable”. (Tit 3: 1-2.)

They are also asked to pray “for kings and all who are in high positions” so that they “may continue to lead quiet and peaceful lives with total devotion and sincerity”. (1 Timothy 2: 1-2.)

Nonetheless, if they believe a law is contrary to Jehovah’s biblical dictates, they will refuse to keep a law.

Politically neutral, they also refuse to participate in many civic activities.

Witnesses do not vote or run for office, take oaths of allegiance or sing patriotic hymns. They will also not do military service, although they have the option to do community service if their conscience allows.

Persecution is not a new phenomenon to the Witnesses. The Soviets banished many of them to Siberia. The Nazis took others to concentration camps.

In the United States, Jehovah’s Witnesses encountered hostility, particularly when they refused to salute the flag or serve in the armed forces.

The witnesses had an overwhelming influence on US constitutional law, according to Jane G. Rainey, professor emeritus of political science at Eastern Kentucky University.

“Perhaps no other religious sect, relative to its size, has a greater influence on the expansion of freedom of worship in the First Amendment than Jehovah’s Witnesses,” says Rainey in the First Amendment encyclopedia.


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Gordon May Obituary (2022) – Madison, Wisconsin https://tac-lawna.org/gordon-may-obituary-2022-madison-wisconsin/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 09:09:17 +0000 https://tac-lawna.org/gordon-may-obituary-2022-madison-wisconsin/ May, Gordon E. “Joe” STOUGHTON – Gordon E. “Joe” May, 93 years old, of Stoughton, died on December 30, 2021, peacefully surrounded by his family. He was a longtime resident of Stoughton and also lived in Madison for 30 years. Gordon was born on July 25, 1928 in Minden, Neb., To Grace (Atchison) and Paul […]]]>

May, Gordon E. “Joe”

STOUGHTON – Gordon E. “Joe” May, 93 years old, of Stoughton, died on December 30, 2021, peacefully surrounded by his family. He was a longtime resident of Stoughton and also lived in Madison for 30 years. Gordon was born on July 25, 1928 in Minden, Neb., To Grace (Atchison) and Paul May Sr. He attended Stoughton Public Schools and graduated in 1946.

Gordon spent two years in the U.S. Army, where he trained at the Army Intelligence School at Fort Riley, Can., And served in intelligence operations with the 88th Infantry Division in Italy. After his release, the GI Bill allowed him to attend the University of Wisconsin-Madison in three years, where he earned a bachelor’s degree in sociology. He had the privilege of working with fellow veterans on the Badger Honor Flight to Washington, DC in September 2013.

Survivors include his five children, Mary Jo (Dan) Davis, Marcia Tarrant, Margie May from Stoughton, Margy May and Michael May from Oregon; and his stepchildren Michael Hotchkiss and Renee (Hotchkiss) Johnson and their families. He is also survived by four grandchildren, Betsy (Matt) Towns, Mari Davis, and Justin and Eddie Blumenthal; and great-grandchildren, Malcolm and Noah Towns and Lydia Davis. In addition to his parents, Gordon preceded his first wife and mother of his children Betty (Holtan) May in death; his second wife Ardell (Hotchkiss) May; Brother Paul May Jr .; Daughter-in-law Lisa May; special niece, Jean Reid; and other family members.

Gordon worked for the Wisconsin State Department of Administration, where he managed state real estate for 30 years before retiring in 1987 at the age of 59. He was an avid athlete who worked with his father, brother Paul, and son Mike. liked to hunt and fish. He also raised Brittany Spaniels and conducted field trials across the Midwest. Gordon loved playing golf with his “Cronies,” as he called them, at Stoughton Country Club. In the 1980s he and his wife Betty opened the Quill & Brush Art Gallery in Stoughton. Gordon loved music and enjoyed the big band era. He has been fortunate enough to see many big names perform – Louie Armstrong, Benny Goodman, and Glen Miller, to name a few. He loved the Chicago Cubs, the Green Bay Packers, and the Wisconsin Badgers. Gordon took great pride in being a candidate for the Wheel of Fortune, where he was the grand prize winner of a new car and merchandise. He loved Florida’s Emerald Coast and wintered in Destin, Florida for 30 years.

Gordon was a member of the Stoughton Country Club, Bethel Lutheran Church, and the American Legion Post 59 of Stoughton, and served on the Stoughton School Board in the 1970s.

Gordon believed that family was the most important aspect of his life. His family was his world and he loved spending time with his children and their families.

The family would like to thank Gordon’s Caregivers and the Agrace Hospice for the excellent home care and are grateful for the dedication, kindness and friendship shown to Gordon and his family.

A memorial service will be held on Saturday, January 22nd at 11am at Madison’s BETHEL LUTHERAN CHURCH. The family receives friends in church an hour before the service. Instead of flowers, gifts of money can be sent to the Wisconsin Chapter of the American Parkinson’s Organization: www.apdaparkinson.org/community/wisconsin. Grasse Funeral Service in Rio supports the family.

www.grassefs.com

Published by Madison.com on January 6, 2022.


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Religious extremism threatens regional peace, church leaders say https://tac-lawna.org/religious-extremism-threatens-regional-peace-church-leaders-say/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 14:52:01 +0000 https://tac-lawna.org/religious-extremism-threatens-regional-peace-church-leaders-say/ LAHORE: Pakistani church leaders on Tuesday called on the world community to take note of the increasing incidents of sectarian attacks on minorities in India, saying religious extremism is a threat to regional peace. At a press conference at the Lahore press club, Church leaders, including moderator / president Bishop Dr. Azad Marshall, the Bishop […]]]>

LAHORE: Pakistani church leaders on Tuesday called on the world community to take note of the increasing incidents of sectarian attacks on minorities in India, saying religious extremism is a threat to regional peace.

At a press conference at the Lahore press club, Church leaders, including moderator / president Bishop Dr. Azad Marshall, the Bishop of Multan Leo Roderick Paul, the Bishop of Sialkot Alwin Samuel and the Bishop Emeritus Manu Rumal Shah raised the international community to the persecution of Christians, Muslims and other religious minorities in India.

On the occasion, Bishop Marshall said the Pakistani church leadership was extremely concerned about the increase in attacks on Christians and other minorities in India.

“India prides itself on being the largest democracy in the world, but its brazen violations of religious freedom have exposed its claim to be a truly secular country,” he said.

He said that the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom in its latest 2021 report highlighted that the BJP-led government is promoting Hindu nationalist policies that result in systematic, persistent, and outrageous violations of religious freedom that result have a negative impact on non-Hindu religious communities. Including Muslims, Christians, Sikhs, Dalits and Adivasis.

“The attacks on religious minorities and the vandalism of minority places of worship, the passing of the 2019 Citizenship Change Act and the persecution of Christians under the guise of measures against religious conversion should be of serious concern to the world,” he said, adding to Der Abuse of policies such as the Prevention of Unlawful Activities Act and Financial Contribution (Regulation) Act enabled the Government of India to silence or prevent individuals and NGOs from reporting and combating religious persecution.

Bishop Marshall also called for the protection of minorities in Pakistan, saying that effective laws are needed to protect underage minority girls from sexual exploitation in the guise of religious conversion and marriage to their kidnappers.

“We have repeatedly called for the end of child rape in the name of religious conversion and for the government to reconsider its decision to oppose the law against forced conversion. This is not a religious issue, it is a question of protecting the girl, ”he said, adding that the church leadership had provided the government with a list of the names of children allegedly kidnapped and forcibly converted to Islam in the past year Progress.

He also announced that the Church has set up a hotline that Christians can use to report their problems and get legal assistance.

Dealing with other issues facing the Pakistani Christian community, Bishop Marshall said that while the situation of Christians in Pakistan is much better than in India, the community faces many challenges that the government’s immediate attention is drawn to required.

“Growing intolerance and abuse of blasphemy laws are also concerns. We are not calling for the law to be repealed, but there is no deterring false accusations. We are calling for the expansion of the laws that categorically require the state to punish false accusers of blasphemy rather than impose on the prosecuted, ”he said, reiterating that such cases will be investigated by a special task force made up of army officials.

The church leader also condemned the publication of discriminatory job advertisements seeking only Christians to fill positions of plumbing workers. “It is extremely heartbreaking for the entire community and the government must end this practice. Our people have contributed a lot in health, education, defense and other sectors, but labeling Christians for sanitation only is quite daunting for the church, ”he said.

The church leaders also criticized the results of the 2017 census and called for the Christian community to be recorded transparently and thoroughly at the next census. They also called for a strict implementation of education and employment quotas for minorities in all state institutes and departments.

Bishop Leo Roderick called for the protection of community property from the land mafia. He said that by authorizing the provinces to issue NOCs, the government had opened a back door for such elements.

Bishop Samuel demanded that all missionary educational institutions nationalized in the 1970s be returned to the care of church authorities. “Our people have suffered a lot since our institutes were nationalized and it is important that we regain their custody of providing education to our community members. Nationalization led to the commercialization of education, which resulted in poor and vulnerable communities being denied quality, but affordable, education, ”he said.

The bishops also asked the government to facilitate registration with the economic department for receiving donations from abroad. “The government classifies the church as an NGO, while it is a worshiping community that runs charity projects as a service to its members. We are working on the documentation process, but the suspension of funds has severely affected our charity and educational projects. We appeal to the government to take some relief until we can complete the process so that our core work does not suffer, ”they said.



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The historic village that once belonged to Cambridge University and is known for its thatched cottages https://tac-lawna.org/the-historic-village-that-once-belonged-to-cambridge-university-and-is-known-for-its-thatched-cottages/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 13:07:51 +0000 https://tac-lawna.org/the-historic-village-that-once-belonged-to-cambridge-university-and-is-known-for-its-thatched-cottages/ The small village of Gamlingay, on the border between Cambridgeshire and Bedfordshire, has a fascinating history. The village has proven popular with home buyers in recent years and is truly an ancient village mentioned in the Doomsday Book of 1086. There has been a settlement in the village since the Bronze Age, but today Gamlingay […]]]>

The small village of Gamlingay, on the border between Cambridgeshire and Bedfordshire, has a fascinating history.

The village has proven popular with home buyers in recent years and is truly an ancient village mentioned in the Doomsday Book of 1086.

There has been a settlement in the village since the Bronze Age, but today Gamlingay is known for its thatched-roof huts and is a popular spot with commuters.

READ MORE: CambridgeshireLive property news

The village is one of five places in Cambridgeshire where house prices have soared in 2020 despite the pandemic.

The value of property in Gamlingay and the surrounding villages rose four percent in 2020, with the average price here rising by £ 12,500 to £ 367,500 in 2020.

A village owned by the Universities of Cambridge and Oxford

Gamlingay has been inhabited for many centuries and even Neolithic stone tools have been found there.

During his time the village was owned by colleges from the Universities of Cambridge and Oxford, and had been in almost continuous succession since 1599.

The village layout was not changed after a devastating fire in 1600, however, Merton College, Oxford made changes in the late Middle Ages to establish Merton Manor Farm.

It was then owned by the Cambridge Downing and Clare Colleges, with the village schoolhouse still visible on the 1848 building.

The village has been served by many pubs over the years. It is said that there were more than 50 operating bus routes to London at one time. Rumor has it that the highwayman Dick Turpin once rode through Gamlingay on a trip north.

One of these historic pubs has become a restaurant and two are still in operation.

The Hardwicke Arms, now an Indian restaurant, dates back to the 19th century, although the original construction is likely from the 18th century.

In the Middle Ages, the square in front of the pub was a marketplace and a gathering point for hunting. The pub’s name was a dedication to the Earls of Hardwicke who once lived at nearby Wimpole Hall.

Gamlingay’s Church is the Parish Church of St. Mary the Virgin, a beautiful Grade II listed building that is part of the Diocese of Ely.

Most of the building dates from the 13th century, with some alterations being made in the 14th and 15th centuries. However, there was a church in the parish long before that, i.e. before 1120.

The church is the only listed building in the village, however there are 72 listed buildings in the village, from stables to barns, mansions and even an iconic red telephone box.

The village has a primary school which joined the Cam Academy Trust in April 2016 to provide education for all primary school ages.

There is no secondary school, however, so many students attend secondary schools outside of the village and many later attend Comberton Village College, another member of the Cam Academy Trust.

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Ancient Greek symbol of good luck for the new year https://tac-lawna.org/ancient-greek-symbol-of-good-luck-for-the-new-year/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 22:10:02 +0000 https://tac-lawna.org/ancient-greek-symbol-of-good-luck-for-the-new-year/ Pomegranates. Photo credit: Joergens.mi / Wikimedia commons /CC BY-SA 3.0 Smashing a pomegranate on New Year’s Day is an old Greek custom that continues to this day, as the red colored, nutritious fruit is a symbol of life and happiness. The ancient Greeks believed that the ruby ​​arilles, or seeds of the pomegranate, symbolized abundance, […]]]>
Pomegranates. Photo credit: Joergens.mi / Wikimedia commons /CC BY-SA 3.0

Smashing a pomegranate on New Year’s Day is an old Greek custom that continues to this day, as the red colored, nutritious fruit is a symbol of life and happiness.

The ancient Greeks believed that the ruby ​​arilles, or seeds of the pomegranate, symbolized abundance, perhaps because of their abundance. They also stand for fertility, eternity and happiness.

Pomegranate is nutritious and high in sugar, vitamins A, B, C, minerals like phosphorus, potassium, sodium and iron, and has more antioxidants than red wine or green tea.

This miracle fruit is also a unique natural cosmetic. Well-known Greek cosmetic companies, who base their products on natural ingredients from the Greek motherland, use pomegranate in many products for skin care and anti-aging properties.

Modern Greek tradition of smashing a pomegranate

In modern times, Greek Orthodox tradition dictates that the family gather outside on New Year’s Eve and when the clock strikes midnight, a pomegranate is rolled and pounded on the front door of the house.

The more seeds there are scattered on the ground, the happier the New Year will be.

Alternatively, this custom can take place on New Years Day, when family members are in their Sunday clothes, go to church to attend the Divine Liturgy of Basil of Caesarea and greet the New Year.

The host takes a pomegranate to church to bless the fruit and when the family comes home, he knocks on the door so that he will be the first to enter the house in the New Year.

Then he hits the pomegranate either in front of the door or against the door, wishing that the juicy, luscious ruby-like segments of the fruit would flood the house with health and happiness – and create as many joys as the pomegranate has arren.

The fruit in antiquity

Pomegranate trees have been cultivated since ancient times and were mentioned in Homer’s Odyssey, where they grew on the island of Scheria or Phaiacia in the gardens of King Alcinous. In addition, Theophrastus and Hippocrates also refer to the fruit for its healing properties.

The most famous myth associated with the pomegranate fruit is that of Hades’ kidnapping of Persephone. According to the myth, Hades offered Persephone the fruit to seal their eternal bond.

The pomegranate was also closely related to the Eleusinian mysteries, as the priests wore wreaths made from branches of pomegranate trees during these ceremonies.

Many archaeological finds show that the pomegranate fruit was already known in the Mediterranean region in antiquity, as it was reflected in ancient art.

On the Greek island of Milos, in Phylakopi, pomegranates were painted on urns. At Akrotiri on Santorini, urns with motifs of pomegranate fruit were also unearthed during excavations.

In Crete, Minoan treasures also show the shape of the fruit in paintings from the 17th and 18th centuries.

The National Archaeological Museum in Athens owns a magnificent brass pomegranate that was discovered on the Acropolis.


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Lawsuits, insurance companies at the heart of the New Mexico Archdiocese bankruptcy case https://tac-lawna.org/lawsuits-insurance-companies-at-the-heart-of-the-new-mexico-archdiocese-bankruptcy-case/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 06:08:27 +0000 https://tac-lawna.org/lawsuits-insurance-companies-at-the-heart-of-the-new-mexico-archdiocese-bankruptcy-case/ The Archdiocese of Santa Fe’s Chapter 11 bankruptcy efforts have been going on for three years without ending in the case, which includes more than 400 victims of clergy abuse. Lawyers say three years is a comparatively long time for Chapter 11 proceedings, but it is by no means unknown. It is in the interests […]]]>

The Archdiocese of Santa Fe’s Chapter 11 bankruptcy efforts have been going on for three years without ending in the case, which includes more than 400 victims of clergy abuse.

Lawyers say three years is a comparatively long time for Chapter 11 proceedings, but it is by no means unknown. It is in the interests of everyone – the archdiocese and the victims – to get Chapter 11 resolved, lawyers say. A possible agreement is therefore still expected.

“The alternatives are so bad it’s worth staying in the game,” said Laura Coordes, associate professor of law at Arizona State University, of Chapter 11.

The archdiocese is trying to raise an adequate amount through property sales, donations and insurance to reach an agreement with the victims.

On a blog this month, Archbishop John Wester wrote: “We knew when we moved to Chapter 11 that it would not be easy. We are making progress, albeit slowly. Please pray that this arduous and lengthy process will bring healing to the victims of sexual abuse, their families, our communities, and this local Church. “

Chapter 11 allows the company in dire financial straits to work with plaintiffs to reach an agreement.

Coordes and Albuquerque bankruptcy attorney Dave Giddens told the Santa Fe New Mexican that the alternatives to reaching an agreement would typically be to convert the case into Chapter 7 bankruptcy, with a trustee in charge of the sale of assets would. Or the case could be closed and many victims would then file lawsuits individually.

Giddens, who is not involved in the Archdiocese of Santa Fe, said three years in Chapter 11 were relatively tedious.

“Most of them don’t make it that long if they can,” he said.

But he added that this is a big case that many “skilled professionals” are working on and it is likely that they will find a way to come to an agreement. Involved in the case are James Stang from Los Angeles, who represents some of the victims, and Ford Elsaesser from Idaho, who represents the archdiocese. Both are experienced in such cases.

Merit Bennett, a Santa Fe attorney representing four victims, said the finish line was not in sight.

“There are so many what-ifs that it is really impossible to predict anything,” he said. “It’s like anything could happen.”

The Archdiocese has signaled that it is working to get acceptable payouts from insurers who are key players in these cases. Rev. Glennon Jones, Vicar General of the Archdiocese, wrote in the fall that negotiations with insurers “can take a while, but there is no way to accelerate them”.

Meanwhile, the Archdiocese held an online auction this year to sell small, donated properties for approximately $ 1.4 million. A second auction is planned for January 31 to February 7.

A $ 1.4 million infusion won’t change the picture, a Santa Fe attorney said.

“The answer is insurance,” said Aaron Boland, who is representing a victim.

Two high profile national Chapter 11 sexual abuse cases reported breakthroughs last week. The Boy Scouts of America announced that insurer Chubb Ltd. has agreed to pay $ 800 million.

And USA Gymnastics agreed to pay $ 380 million to more than 500 gymnasts who were sexually abused by a team doctor, Larry Nassar, and others. USA Gymnastics was filing for bankruptcy protection around the time the Archdiocese of Santa Fe was filing for bankruptcy.

BishopAccountabiility.org, a website that monitors cases of pedophile priests and Catholic organizations bankruptcy due to abuse, lists 26 dioceses that have filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy since 2004. Most, but not all, were settled within three years.

Gallup Diocese paid more than $ 20 million for about 55 victims in three years.

It took the Diocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis more than three years to agree to pay $ 210 million to 450 victims in 2018.

In its case archive, the website collects statements from lawyers and dioceses and, above all, media reports. Seven dioceses, including those in New Orleans and Buffalo, NY, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in 2020.

Some dioceses have settled for large amounts, such as about $ 198 million in San Diego, and others with much smaller amounts, including about $ 12 million from Fairbanks. None of the 26 cases have been replaced by any other means of crisis management, such as Chapter 7 or individual lawsuits.

Giddens said a judge could threaten to convert the case into one of these options in order to get opponents back into negotiations.

Coordes said the best way to do this was to reach an agreement on Chapter 11 bankruptcy.

“You pretty much bet your hopes or your money on making it work,” she said.

The case of the Archdiocese of Santa Fe has been controversial at times. A mediator has been replaced. U.S. bankruptcy judge David T. Thuma ruled this year that victims can continue their legal claim that the archdiocese had transferred property and cash to its 93 parishes over the past decade to prevent victims from accessing those assets.

When Wester announced to voters in the spring that St. Pius X High School in Albuquerque would be retained, one of the victims’s lawyers, Albuquerque’s Levi Monagle, said not so quickly.

Monagle said at the time that “all the assets of the diocese are on the table” until the archdiocese piles up an appropriate amount.

And Monagle’s partner Brad Hall said of the case in July, “If it explodes, it explodes.” Monagle and Hall represent about 140 victims.

Bennett said he would feel like the end is near when those involved start talking about allocating money to victims.

That too could be a challenge. He said he did not know if each victim would get the same amount of money or if it was based on the number of harassments or the victim’s emotional state today.

One man could have been molested once but attempted suicide 30 times, Bennett said, while another man could have been molested 30 times and now successfully run a business.

Maybe it would be best to split it up evenly, he said. “That way, you don’t have to go through the hellish process of who was hurt more, and how do you quantify that?”

Coordes said getting insurance companies to pay puts a Chapter 11 case on a much better footing. At least until then, the case rumbles.

“I’m sure it’s phenomenally frustrating for the victims,” ​​she said. “Really, for everyone.”

Copyright 2021 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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