Church Economy – TAC Lawna http://tac-lawna.org/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 22:27:49 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://tac-lawna.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-11-150x150.png Church Economy – TAC Lawna http://tac-lawna.org/ 32 32 World news, business and analysis based on Bible prophecy https://tac-lawna.org/world-news-business-and-analysis-based-on-bible-prophecy/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 20:32:50 +0000 https://tac-lawna.org/world-news-business-and-analysis-based-on-bible-prophecy/ 00:30 “Worse Than Watergate” (16 minutes)The speaking minds of the far left are all reading from the same script: The Jan. 6 results are shocking evidence that the Capitol protest was “worse than Watergate.” In truth, the partisan show trial is little more than a blatant attack on President Donald Trump. 16:55 Biden’s green energy […]]]>

00:30 “Worse Than Watergate” (16 minutes)
The speaking minds of the far left are all reading from the same script: The Jan. 6 results are shocking evidence that the Capitol protest was “worse than Watergate.” In truth, the partisan show trial is little more than a blatant attack on President Donald Trump.

16:55 Biden’s green energy (7 minutes)
Joe Biden’s government is looking to switch to green new energy as Europe moves in the opposite direction. “The federal government will pass emergency legislation to reactivate coal-fired power plants while Europe takes steps to deal with reduced energy supplies from Russia,” he said telegraph reported.

23:40 America’s belief in God is hitting rock bottom (9 minutes)
A new Gallup poll found that 81 percent of US adults say they believe in God, down six percentage points from just a few years ago. Worse, many of those who believe in God do not believe that God hears or answers their prayers.

32:25 Bible Study: Protection and Deliverance Prayers (16 minutes)
Ancient Israelite priests would beat incense into a fine powder before offering it to the Holy of Holies on the Day of Atonement. For the high priest, this incense was a matter of life and death before God. Likewise, fervent prayer for God’s people is a matter of survival.

48:10 Celtic Throne feedback (6 minutes)

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Sri Lanka’s bishops blame corruption and mismanagement for the economic crisis https://tac-lawna.org/sri-lankas-bishops-blame-corruption-and-mismanagement-for-the-economic-crisis/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 06:02:55 +0000 https://tac-lawna.org/sri-lankas-bishops-blame-corruption-and-mismanagement-for-the-economic-crisis/ ROME – Soaring food and fuel prices in Sri Lanka have sparked the country’s worst political unrest in years, prompting thousands of protesters to demonstrate for change. As the government falters alongside its economy, the country’s Catholic bishops are sending out an SOS. “People are stranded [. . .] without basic necessities such as food, […]]]>

ROME – Soaring food and fuel prices in Sri Lanka have sparked the country’s worst political unrest in years, prompting thousands of protesters to demonstrate for change. As the government falters alongside its economy, the country’s Catholic bishops are sending out an SOS.

“People are stranded [. . .] without basic necessities such as food, fuel and household and industrial gas. Patients are left without the drugs they need to sustain their lives. Parents crave formula for infants and children,” reads the statement released by the Catholic Bishops’ Conference of Sri Lanka (CBCSL) on June 16 at the end of its Plenary Session.


The prelates warned that violence is a real danger as the country’s economic crisis deepens and urged the government to quickly change policy and amend the constitution to limit the president’s powers.

The economic downturn has resulted in shortages of several staple foods, as well as gasoline and medicines. On Friday, the government ordered public sector workers to work from home for two weeks because of severe fuel shortages as the island nation grapples with its worst financial turmoil since gaining independence from Britain in 1948.

Sri Lanka is struggling to find foreign exchange to pay for the necessary fuel imports. The existing supply of petrol and diesel will probably be used up in a few days.

“We urge the government to take drastic steps to address these issues and bring about justice and justice and pave the way for our children and youth to have a country where they can live in dignity,” the bishops wrote .

For the CBCSL, “The tragedy that has befallen our nation is without doubt the worst of our times.”

“There should be an aid package to bring basic necessities to the poorest of the poor. The unbridled rise in prices of basic necessities, scarcity and hoarding are seriously affecting the daily lives of people who are forced to wait in long lines,” the bishops wrote.

Sri Lanka’s foreign exchange reserves have practically dried up and it can no longer afford to import basic foodstuffs and fuel. The government blames the COVID-19 pandemic, which has hit Sri Lanka’s tourism business – one of its biggest foreign exchange earners. It also said tourists were deterred by a series of deadly church bombings in 2019.

However, many experts say economic mismanagement is to blame. Among those blaming the country’s civilian leadership are the Catholic bishops: “Those responsible for this terrible economic crisis have yet to be exposed,” the bishops’ statement said. The bishops said that the main causes of the economic crisis were “rampant corruption and absolute mismanagement by successive governments and political instability”.

Much of popular anger over the economic crisis has been directed at President Gotabaya Rajapaksa and his brother Mahinda, whom he appointed as prime minister but then ousted in May despite widespread protests.

In their statement, the bishops also address the country’s politics, saying they are very concerned that changes to the constitution have concentrated too many powers in the hands of the president, including his ability to appoint anyone to government office without consent Members of Parliament.

The bishops called for the “absolute independence of the judiciary” and of all other commissions “only under the direction of Parliament”.

“In this way, genuine democracy can be restored in the country,” the bishops’ statement said.

The Rajapaksa dynasty has been in and out of government for decades, and three other members of the president’s family are members of the cabinet. That Associated Press reports that the family is not going down without a fight, is ordering troops to shoot at protesters who injure people or property, imposing a nationwide curfew and reportedly encouraging mobs of their supporters to take to the streets to fight with anti-government protesters.

In the same statement, the bishops urged everyone to “refrain from violence,” while appealing to the government to respect people’s legitimate rights to freedom of expression and movement.

“The tireless protests and demonstrations, especially by young citizens, which have led to addressing the need for a system change, must be acknowledged,” said the prelate.

They noted that the “failure of the system” had forced the entire population to clamor for “radical change”.

Follow Inés San Martín on Twitter: @inesanma


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Amherst is hosting its 16th birthday celebrations this weekend https://tac-lawna.org/amherst-is-hosting-its-16th-birthday-celebrations-this-weekend/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 23:07:49 +0000 https://tac-lawna.org/amherst-is-hosting-its-16th-birthday-celebrations-this-weekend/ AMHERST — An interactive walk featuring historic sites of Amherst’s first Black and Indigenous families is one element of a June 16 celebration that also marks the launch on Saturday of a new charitable foundation aimed at building a more just future. The Saturday June 16th events, which are separate from a June 16th anniversary […]]]>

AMHERST — An interactive walk featuring historic sites of Amherst’s first Black and Indigenous families is one element of a June 16 celebration that also marks the launch on Saturday of a new charitable foundation aimed at building a more just future.

The Saturday June 16th events, which are separate from a June 16th anniversary celebration beginning Sunday noon on the Town Common, are being hosted in part by Ancestral Bridges, which is run by Anika Lopes, an Amherst councilwoman and hatter who serves as acts, the president of the foundation was brought into being. The foundation aims to improve economic and cultural opportunities for Black, Indigenous and People of Color (BIPOC) in the region.

According to Lopes, the foundation, which takes its name from her maternal ancestors and late grandfather Dudley Bridges, is about empowering members of the BIPOC community who are systematically denied wealth-building opportunities such as home and land ownership, college scholarships and financial investments became.

“As a direct result of the lack of generational wealth, BIPOC youth today are often disadvantaged in school, entering college, starting businesses and owning property,” Lopes said. “We will continue to develop the future potential of BIPOC in the Amherst area.”

Saturday’s events begin at 11 a.m. at West Cemetery, located between Triangle Street and North Pleasant Street at the north end of downtown, where the foundation will be announced. There, attendees will honor the lives and contributions of the all-black 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry Regiment and the famous 5th Cavalry, some of whom are buried there. These were among the soldiers who alerted Texas residents that the Civil War and slavery were over, and is the historical event that serves as the origin of June 16th.

Then it’s off to the Emily Dickinson Museum on Main Street at 12pm and the Amherst History Museum on Amity Street at 1pm to see a collection of indigenous tools and arrowheads.

The centerpiece of the day is the Juneteenth Heritage Walking Tour in partnership with the Amherst Historical Society and Museum and local organizations and descendants of black families. The tour will showcase black neighborhood sights over a 1.5-mile (2.4 km) journey, giving people a chance to immerse themselves in the everyday experiences of Black Amherst residents from 200 years ago to the present day.

“With this walking tour, we draw back the curtain on how my family and other Black and Indigenous Amherst historical residents lived and worked, what they hoped for and what they fought for, so that Black youth and others can understand this part of our history and use them to grow,” Lopes said.

Neighborhoods featured on the tour include the Westside District, which includes homes at Hazel Avenue, Baker Street, Snell Street and Northampton Road, which was designated a National Historic District in 2000 as a result of Bridges’ efforts, and the neighborhoods of McClellan, Beston and Paige Streets. Hope Church and Goodwin Church will also be part of the tour.

The walking tour will also feature a special art installation by local artist Shirley Jackson Whitaker, highlighting the Tote2Vote campaign, which was recently launched to raise awareness of voter suppression.

The day concludes with a 5pm concert at the Drake Venue on North Pleasant Street.

Those with limited mobility should meet at the high school parking lot at 10:30 am.

For the foundation, in addition to cultural events and exhibitions like the one on June 16, Lopes also sees internship opportunities, education to build wealth and initial home ownership initiatives.

The Board of Trustees includes William Harris, President and CEO of Space Center Houston, Professor Kamal Ali, attorney Michael Pill, Police Captain Gabriel Ting, Amherst High School Principal Talib Sadiq, education reformer Sucharitha Cintron and Jackson Whitaker. Former State Senator Stan Rosenberg and Donald Brown will join in advisory roles.

Lopes works with Cinda Jones, President of WD Cowls, whose family was part of the Hatfield and Amherst Colonial settlers, and becomes Vice President of the Foundation.

“We are working together to ensure that Indigenous culture is reclaimed, family stories are told, and economic and homeownership opportunities are created for the BIPOC area,” Jones said in a statement.

Scott Merzbach can be reached at smerzbach@gazettenet.com.

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Gas station owner halts sale due to rising prices, refuses to ‘participate’ https://tac-lawna.org/gas-station-owner-halts-sale-due-to-rising-prices-refuses-to-participate/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 12:25:27 +0000 https://tac-lawna.org/gas-station-owner-halts-sale-due-to-rising-prices-refuses-to-participate/ Rep. James Comer, R-Ky., weighs Biden’s energy policy in “Mornings with Maria.” Reynold Gladu has owned a gas station in Massachusetts for nearly half a century, but with prices in excess of $5 a gallon, he decided enough was enough. Earlier this month, Gladu emptied the pumps at his station, Ren’s Mobil Service, and sold […]]]>

Reynold Gladu has owned a gas station in Massachusetts for nearly half a century, but with prices in excess of $5 a gallon, he decided enough was enough.

Earlier this month, Gladu emptied the pumps at his station, Ren’s Mobil Service, and sold the last remaining gallons after deciding not to buy any more. After 48 years in business, he could no longer take part in what he believed to be an industry that exploited its customers.

“I don’t want to be a part of it anymore,” Gladu told the Daily Hampshire Gazette. “This is the biggest rip-off that has ever happened to people in my life.”

Gladu blames ExxonMobil for driving up their prices. He claimed that the company “isn’t thinking through its pricing policy anymore.”

GAS PRICES SET A NEW RECORD SUNDAY MORNING

“I’ve been serving their product, but I refuse to continue doing it because they’re only getting richer,” he said.

“Enough is enough,” said Gladu. “People shouldn’t have to pay those prices to go to work, go to church or whatever they need to do.

However, ExxonMobil stated that they had nothing to do with it.

‘UGLY’ INFLATION REPORT COULD PUT 75 BAPS FED RATE HIKE ON THE TABLE

“Gas stations are privately owned and the prices of their fuel are based on local market competition and other business factors,” Julie King, ExxonMobil Corp. operations media manager, told the Gazette. “Prices at the pump are influenced by the price of crude oil and the wholesale price of products, which fluctuate based on demand and supply factors – such as economic conditions and seasonal factors, fuel production, inventories, storage and transportation costs.”

King also said a wholesaler supplies Mobilgas and Gladu confirmed this. Nevertheless, he accused the oil industry of “being there” and “enough is enough”.

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President Biden has also blamed gas prices on oil companies like ExxonMobil, claiming they are making huge profits without increasing production.

The President has also blamed Russian President Vladimir Putin for the rise and inflation in general. While gas prices have skyrocketed since Russia invaded Ukraine in February, they had previously risen steadily throughout Biden’s presidency.

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Guatemalans in exile seek US help to achieve democracy and rule of law https://tac-lawna.org/guatemalans-in-exile-seek-us-help-to-achieve-democracy-and-rule-of-law/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 16:48:52 +0000 https://tac-lawna.org/guatemalans-in-exile-seek-us-help-to-achieve-democracy-and-rule-of-law/ WASHINGTON, DC — A panel of exiled Guatemalans organized by religious organizations in the US has expressed concern about the stifling of democracy and the rule of law in Central America, saying a US failure to fight corruption there would do so continue to drive mass migration from the region. When the panel met via […]]]>

WASHINGTON, DC — A panel of exiled Guatemalans organized by religious organizations in the US has expressed concern about the stifling of democracy and the rule of law in Central America, saying a US failure to fight corruption there would do so continue to drive mass migration from the region.

When the panel met via Zoom on June 6, a large group of migrants — as many as 6,000 according to some reports — were reportedly headed to the US-Mexico border from Latin America.


Organizers said they were trying to reach the region to draw attention to the reasons driving the mass migration — corruption, violence, economic instability — until the June 10 Los Angeles Summit of the Americas ended.

“A small group of families, of people, managed the land like a plantation, as if the territory were their personal property,” said Juan Francisco Sandoval, a former Guatemalan anti-corruption investigator at the Hope Border Institute and Faith organized panels in action.

“And because of that,” he continued, “the country is in a state where there are … few people with education, little investment in society, because that same unequal system ultimately allows for cheap labor and allows control over the threads.” of the political (system) and destiny of the country.”

The Hope Border Institute and Faith in Action organizations are part of the Root Causes Initiative, led by faith groups seeking to influence US policy and how it affects factors driving migration.

The panel was part of an effort calling for the imposition of financial sanctions on Guatemalan “senior officials and oligarchs who have conspired to coerce more than two dozen independent judges, prosecutors and civil society leaders,” including panellists, into exile .

Fearing for his life, Sandoval fled his native Guatemala in July 2021 after being dismissed with impunity by the Guatemalan Special Prosecutor’s Office, initially set up by a United Nations-backed commission to fight corruption. The lawyer who investigated high-profile transplant cases now has an arrest warrant out for him in Guatemala.

A second panelist, Thelma Aldana, a former chair of Guatemala’s Supreme Court and the country’s former attorney general, was granted asylum in the US after being forced to leave the country in 2021 due to threats of imprisonment over her anti-corruption efforts.

It is this kind of politically motivated retaliation that stifles democracy and the rule of law that the Summit of the Americas, a gathering of leaders from North, Central and South America, says it is trying to eradicate. The panel was organized as a preview of the regional summit.

On a website about the event, the US State Department, which is hosting the event, said it is working to “engage stakeholders in the region to make leadership commitments and concrete actions that will dramatically improve pandemic response and resilience, a green and just recovery, building strong and inclusive democracies and tackling the root causes of irregular migration.”

However, some of the region’s leaders did not show up for the summit and showed little willingness to work with the US vision.

Mexican President Andres Lopez Obrador announced on June 6, the day the summit opened, that he would not be present because the US had barred Cuba, Nicaragua and Venezuela from the gathering. He accused the Biden administration of “playing the old politics, interventionism, lack of respect for nations and their people.”

White House press secretary Karine Jean-Pierre said the reason they were barred from the event was because “we don’t think dictators should be invited.”

Demonstrators outside the convention center where the Los Angeles gathering was held approved of the decision. Some gathered at the beginning of the summit to protest against Nicaragua’s President Daniel Ortega, but also against Salvadoran President Nayib Bukele, who has jailed 36,000 Salvadorans since late April and suspended some personal liberties after a wave of violence.

Like his counterparts in Guatemala and Honduras, Bukele did not attend but sent a representative.

Migrants from these three countries make up the majority of Latin American immigrants to the United States

Some criticized the Biden administration for focusing too much on the guest list, but they also criticized the Mexican president for being an obstructionist.

Benjamin Gedan, associate director of the Wilson Center’s Latin America program, told CNN on June 9 that the days leading up to the summit had been “absolutely chaotic.”

“The region is in dire need of US support and all kinds of international assistance, and instead we spent months thinking about who would be invited to the summit, who would attend, rather than the agenda for the meeting,” he said.

As China gained economic footholds in many countries in Latin America, but especially Central America, Biden administration officials sought to persuade the region of its economic commitment, including plans to make investments, and its interest in a prosperous Latin America, in particular when it comes down to democracy.

Panelist Ursula Roldán Andrade said that the US “is the only one who can help” as Guatemala and its neighbors enter a “dark epoch, an epoch that signals the loss of institutional democracy,” an epoch that is changing the rule of law finds, which took 25 years to build, torn apart.

The government’s failure to provide its citizens with a safe environment, programs to educate them and advocate for their health has created a social crisis that has left Guatemalans with no choice but to leave, she said.

Thousands of Guatemalans, like many of their regional neighbors, see undocumented migration as the only way out of problems their governments won’t solve, Roldán said, and that will continue unless the region’s problems are solved. There is little hope of organizing as a people to elect leaders who respect even the bare minimum of democratic rules, she said.

Some of the panel’s exiles previously met with US Vice President Kamala Harris during her trip to Guatemala in June 2021 to discuss the government’s economic commitments to help Central American countries curb immigration.

Sandoval said when the meeting took place, Harris spoke of prioritizing issues related to corruption.

“It gave us hope,” he said, but as the months have passed, “I regret not having seen a concrete outcome in terms of anti-corruption efforts,” Harris said.

In response to a question from the audience, Sandoval said he hopes the US Conference of Catholic Bishops will make a strong statement against some of the injustices taking place.

“Historically, the Catholic Church has played a prominent role” in denouncing injustices, he said, if only to let others know what is happening in the country.

Guatemalan Cardinal Álvaro Ramazzini, from Huehuetenango, was present via Zoom to listen to the panel but was unable to speak because of laryngitis, organizers said.

However, in a written note shared via Zoom, he said: “I think the (US bishops’ conference) is so big, with different positions, that I don’t know if they could reach (an opinion) when it comes to a word to say about injustice and poverty in Guatemala. I know bishops in the US who engage in social struggle from an evangelical standpoint, but I don’t find that to be a unanimous position.”

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Palestinians angry at an Israeli court’s decision to sell church property in Jerusalem to a settler group https://tac-lawna.org/palestinians-angry-at-an-israeli-courts-decision-to-sell-church-property-in-jerusalem-to-a-settler-group/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 17:19:57 +0000 https://tac-lawna.org/palestinians-angry-at-an-israeli-courts-decision-to-sell-church-property-in-jerusalem-to-a-settler-group/ AMMAN: Israel’s Supreme Court has ruled that a Jewish settler group legally acquired property in East Jerusalem from the Greek Orthodox Church. The decision ends a dispute over the buildings in the old town that has lasted for almost two decades. The Ateret Cohanim organization, which seeks to “Judaize” Israel’s annexed East Jerusalem, bought three […]]]>

AMMAN: Israel’s Supreme Court has ruled that a Jewish settler group legally acquired property in East Jerusalem from the Greek Orthodox Church. The decision ends a dispute over the buildings in the old town that has lasted for almost two decades.

The Ateret Cohanim organization, which seeks to “Judaize” Israel’s annexed East Jerusalem, bought three buildings from the church in a controversial secret deal in 2004. The sale sparked anger among the Palestinians and led to the dismissal of Patriarch Irineos I.

The church filed charges against Ateret Cohanim, claiming the buildings had been acquired illegally.

In a decision released late Wednesday, Israel’s Supreme Court dismissed the charges, saying the “hard allegations” of misconduct by those involved in the sale had “not been proven true” in previous trials.

The church branded the verdict as “unfair” and lacked “any logical legal basis” and went on to condemn Ateret Cohanim as a “radical organization” that had “used crooked and illegal methods to acquire Christian property” at an extremely important site in Jerusalem.

The Supreme Council of Churches in Palestine called the decision Israel’s legitimacy of “stealing” church property.

The court’s decision means a proposed takeover of the Imperial Hotel by Israeli settlers may now have been facilitated.

Maher Hanna, the Palestinian lawyer for the family that runs the hotel, told Arab News that the decision means his client is now the “last line of defense” to protect the Palestinian presence in the region.

“My client, Mohammad Abu Waleed Dajani, has a long-term protected lease with the Patriarchate and current law prevents tenants from being evicted,” Hanna said, adding he was confident his tenant would be able to stay at the hotel “if the Israeli government respect the existing laws”.

Ramzi Khoury, head of the Palestinian Presidential Church Commission, called the court ruling a “racist and extremist decision” against Palestinians in Jerusalem. Khoury believes the aim of the court decision is to facilitate the deportation of Palestinian Jerusalemites from their city.

“The court is not acting in a legal or even ethical way, but as an executor of the Israeli government’s decision, and is giving in under pressure from groups like Ateret Cohanim,” he said. “The Israeli Supreme Court is politicized in favor of a racist policy aimed at stealing Muslim and Christian holy sites.”

Reverend Munther Isaac, pastor of the Beit Sahour Lutheran Church, told Arab News that the Israeli government “defended these extremists and created a discriminatory legal and regulatory system that protects and supports these radical Jewish groups.”

Botrus Mansour, a Nazareth-based lawyer, told Arab News that all branches of the right-wing Israeli government, including the Supreme Court, are trying to control key positions in Arab Jerusalem.

Mansour said that the international community is currently “distracted” by other issues and that the Israeli government is taking advantage of this to step up anti-Palestinian activities. The only positive thing about Israel’s recent aggression, including its attacks on Al-Aqsa and the assassination of Al-Jazeera reporter Shereen Abu Akleh, is that it has shown the world that Palestinians are fighting for their rights and they have sparked a surge of solidarity with Palestinians around the world.

The church has pledged to use “all influence and means” to prevent the eviction of the hotel tenants.

The Patriarchate said it would “continue to support the Palestinian tenants in their steadfastness in these Christian properties,” adding that it was “steadfast” in its fight to “curb the racist policies and agenda of the far right in Israel.” undermine the multiple identity of the city of Jerusalem and impose a new reality on it.”

Palestinians have long claimed that the proposed takeover of the strategically located hotel, along with the forced “expulsion” of Palestinian families from Jerusalem’s Sheikh Jarrah and Silwan neighborhoods, was politically motivated and part of Israel’s effort to ethnic-cleanse Jerusalem’s Palestinians.

Since Israel’s occupation of Jerusalem in June 1967, organizations such as Elad and Ateret Cohanim, with support from the Israeli state, judiciary, and security services, have worked to seize control of Palestinian property in Jerusalem as part of their efforts to establish a Jewish majority in Jerusalem to ensure the city. This program is said to include the construction of new colonial tourist attractions such as the City of David.

In March, the Greek Orthodox Patriarch of Jerusalem, Theophilus III, condemned the settlers’ planned takeover of the hotel as “a threat to Christian existence” and warned that the settler group would “hijack” Jerusalem by force.

“This issue isn’t about individual properties, but the whole character of Jerusalem, including the Christian Quarter,” he said.

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APC, PDP contenders tease dollars, deteriorate Nigeria’s economy: TMG https://tac-lawna.org/apc-pdp-contenders-tease-dollars-deteriorate-nigerias-economy-tmg/ Mon, 06 Jun 2022 12:19:58 +0000 https://tac-lawna.org/apc-pdp-contenders-tease-dollars-deteriorate-nigerias-economy-tmg/ The Transition Monitoring Group (TMG) has slammed APC and PDP candidates for cornering dollars for Nigerians and businesses, while politicians continue to outdo each other in getting their parties’ tickets to the 2023 general election to get. “We are already seeing a dollarization of the economy due to ongoing politician primaries, which should not be […]]]>

The Transition Monitoring Group (TMG) has slammed APC and PDP candidates for cornering dollars for Nigerians and businesses, while politicians continue to outdo each other in getting their parties’ tickets to the 2023 general election to get.

“We are already seeing a dollarization of the economy due to ongoing politician primaries, which should not be the case. Ordinary citizens and businessmen cannot get dollars because the politicians have taken over the forex allocation to the citizens,” lamented TMG CEO Auwal Rafsanjani. “This dirty money in politics crowds out competent individuals who have the capacity to rule but have no funds or sponsors to provide them with those funds.”

According to the TMG boss, the overt use of money by politicians soliciting votes from delegates “shows that political actors are willing to influence delegate elections”.

“Even now, if you look at the vast sums of money being spent on nomination forms by either party, you will see that it is designed to exclude those who do not have huge funds, most of which are likely to be stolen,” remarked Mr. Rafsanjani.

The TMG boss added: “There are laws that guide this process and political parties, contenders and candidates should abide by them. These actions should be in accordance with the relevant laws governing these processes. The anti-graft agencies such as the Nigerian Financial Intelligence Unit (NFIU) are also required to examine suspicious transaction reports (STRs) filed by banks to ensure they meet the requirements of Know Your Customer (KYC) and Customer Due Diligence (CDD) correspond to .”

Mr Rafsanjani further explained that this would ensure that the sources of money used by the politicians were genuine.

“Over time, what I’m going to call a vicious circle, it’s where politicians spend money on campaigns and then come into office and recover those funds. No one will use thousands of dollars to bribe a delegate or abuse office to get those funds back. It’s a business and in the end it’s the citizens who will suffer,” said the TMG chief.

He called on INEC to ensure that political parties submit their financial data in accordance with Nigeria’s constitution.

“Finally, I urge citizens to make sure they choose skill over money. You should look at candidates’ track records and capacity versus the money on offer,” he said.

(NAN)

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britain: Britain hosts a star-studded Queen’s Jubilee party https://tac-lawna.org/britain-britain-hosts-a-star-studded-queens-jubilee-party/ Sat, 04 Jun 2022 11:51:00 +0000 https://tac-lawna.org/britain-britain-hosts-a-star-studded-queens-jubilee-party/ Britain was gearing up for a ‘Party at the Palace’ concert on Saturday, starring Diana Ross and Andrea Bocelli, which is expected to be seen by millions to celebrate Queen Elizabeth II’s 70th year on the throne. The concert is the culmination of the third day of public events to mark the record-breaking platinum jubilee […]]]>
Britain was gearing up for a ‘Party at the Palace’ concert on Saturday, starring Diana Ross and Andrea Bocelli, which is expected to be seen by millions to celebrate Queen Elizabeth II’s 70th year on the throne.

The concert is the culmination of the third day of public events to mark the record-breaking platinum jubilee of the 96-year-old monarch, which will be attended in person by 22,000 people outside Buckingham Palace.

Motown legend Ross, returning to the UK for the first time in 15 years, is one of the main attractions at the event, which takes place on a purpose-built 360-degree stage outside the Queen’s central London residence.

Rockers Queen + Adam Lambert will open the concert, with Italian opera star Bocelli and James Bond composer Hans Zimmer also in the line-up.

Other cast members include Alicia Keys, Craig David and Rod Stewart, George Ezra and Eurovision 2022 runner-up Sam Ryder. Elton John recorded a tribute.

The Queen – the longest reigning monarch in British history – is not expected to attend the two-and-a-half-hour event in person, instead watching on TV at Windsor Castle.

Her heir Prince Charles, 73, and his eldest son, Prince William, 39, will be in attendance.

On Thursday, the first day of celebrations, the Queen made two public appearances to large crowds from the balcony of Buckingham Palace, then traveled to Windsor to attend a bonfire lighting ceremony.

Derby non show

The exertion, after months of struggling with difficulty walking and standing, left her with “some discomfort,” Buckingham Palace said.

On Friday, she withdrew from a thanksgiving service and also retired from attending Epsom racecourse for flat racing showcase The Derby.

Her absence from Saturday’s derby marks only the fourth time since 1952 that the avid horseracing fanatic, rider and breeder has missed the race.

She did not compete in 2020 as spectators were banned due to Covid.

Saturday’s concert will be broadcast live on radio, television and online by the BBC from 1900 GMT.

As an open-air event, all eyes will be on the skies and the moody British weather to see if it can be spared the downpours forecast later in the evening.

The anniversary celebrations began Thursday with the pageantry and pageantry of the Trooping the Color military parade to mark the sovereign’s official birthday.

The focus on Friday was the traditional Church of England service, led by senior royals – and returning Prince Harry and his wife Meghan – in the sacred setting of St Paul’s Cathedral.

Lilibet’s birthday

On Saturday, the Queen took to Twitter to wish her eponymous great-granddaughter Lilibet a “very happy first birthday” after reportedly meeting Harry and Meghan’s second child in recent days.

The couple, who left royal life in a sensational manner in January 2020, are now based in California.

They are staying at Frogmore Cottage on the Queen’s estate at Windsor Castle while they visit Britain for the Jubilee.

Britain has declared Thursday and Friday public holidays to mark the unprecedented milestone of the Queen’s reign, which has drawn attention to the future of the monarchy without her.

Longer pub hours, street parties and other events celebrating the Queen’s central place in the life of most Britons have temporarily eased the gloom of a mounting cost-of-living crisis.

On Sunday, more than 10 million people will share food at Big Jubilee Lunch picnics and a musical

public procession with 10,000 people.

Ed Sheeran will round out the celebrations on Sunday by singing his 2017 hit “Perfect” at the end of the pageant.

part of my life
Ross, who is traveling to Glastonbury Festival this month after Saturday’s concert, said she was “absolutely delighted to receive an invitation to such a momentous occasion”.

Charles has previously revealed that the 78-year-old diva’s 1980 disco hit “Upside Down” was one of his favorite songs.

Queen guitarist Brian May provided one of the most memorable images of the 2002 anniversary when he played “God Save the Queen” from the roof of Buckingham Palace.

British rocker Stewart, who was knighted for services to music and charity at the Queen’s Birthday Honors in 2016, said Saturday’s performance was “nerve-wracking”.

“I grew up with this woman. I was seven when she took the throne,” the 77-year-old singer told the BBC on Friday.

“She’s always been part of my life.”

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A multitude of Britains under one queen https://tac-lawna.org/a-multitude-of-britains-under-one-queen/ Thu, 02 Jun 2022 13:40:00 +0000 https://tac-lawna.org/a-multitude-of-britains-under-one-queen/ Placeholder when loading item promotions One of the many benefits of monarchy is that it provides a handy way to mark the passage of time. Think “Henrician England” or “Edwardian Britain” and you immediately conjure up a discreet era, captured in pictures and quotes. But what about Elizabeth II’s Britain? The Queen has been on […]]]>
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One of the many benefits of monarchy is that it provides a handy way to mark the passage of time. Think “Henrician England” or “Edwardian Britain” and you immediately conjure up a discreet era, captured in pictures and quotes. But what about Elizabeth II’s Britain? The Queen has been on the throne for so long and the pace of change during her reign has been so rapid that the term doesn’t really express anything. What do the gloomy 1950s have in common with the swinging 60s? Or the crisis-ridden 70s with the booming 90s? Aside from the fact that Elizabeth Windsor was on the throne, of course?

The Britain that 25-year-old Elizabeth inherited when her father George VI. died on February 6, 1952 was strikingly different from the Britain celebrating its platinum jubilee – not so much “a foreign land” in LP Hartley’s wistful expression, but “a continent far, far away” (and one usually referred to as ” England” as if the regional appendages didn’t matter). The country was dominated by a tiny ‘establishment’ – a collection of mixed-marriage families who controlled the Conservative Party (which held power uninterruptedly from 1951 to 1964), Oxbridge, the public schools, the church, the professional professions and the armed forces mastered. Although the queen was at the heart of the establishment, she was also a rare woman in a decidedly homosocial world.

Britain still considered itself an empire, although George VI was in fact the last British king to hold the formal title of “Emperor”. His daughter’s coronation oath was purposely vague about which lands she ruled, declaring her “Queen of this realm and all her other realms and territories,” an vagueness that prompted young Tory MP Enoch Powell to deliver an agonized speech lower house It continued to regard itself as a great power. The Coronation Naval Review at Spithead in June 1953 showed more than 300 ships, including representatives from the USA, USSR and France, led by the battleship HMS Vanguard. Not to be outdone, the Royal Air Force later responded with an overhead display of 600 aircraft, including three V-bomber prototypes.

But this establishment-dominated and imperialist country was also, at heart, a white working-class country. About 80% of the population worked in manual trades – coal mining and steel making were still big industries – with distinctive clothing (cloth hats for men) and branded on the tongue with distinct local accents. George Orwell’s famous description of his countrymen as ‘gentle’ – by which he meant socially conservative and instinctively law-abiding – still held true. In 1955, anthropologist Geoffrey Gorer reported that the English were “gentle, polite and orderly … you hardly ever see a fight in a bar (a not uncommon spectacle in the rest of Europe or the US) … football people are as orderly as a town hall meeting.” .

This public respectability was reinforced by the power of the establishment, usually by tacit agreement but sometimes by legal force. The BBC did not broadcast anything “disparaging of political institutions” and took particular care to ban imitations of leading public figures. Judges ordered the destruction of more than 1,500 “obscene” novels, including Flaubert’s Madame Bovary (1857). During the “Lady Chatterley Trial,” when Penguin Books was indicted for publishing DH Lawrence’s rather horrific corset ripper, the prosecutor’s council asked the jury if it was a book “that you… would wish your wife or yours read servant”.

The country the queen inherited was too much of a balancing act to remain as it was: elitist but proletarian, gentle but arrogant, grand but also ephemeral. But it was not only changed by the logic of these contradictions, but also by four powerful forces.

The first was The Rise of Meritocracy, the title of a 1958 book by Michael Young. The ‘rise’ has continued since the introduction of open competition in the civil service and at Oxbridge Colleges in the mid-19th century. as Young’s report made clear. But so far, “climbing the ladder” had meant recruiting a few exceptional kids into the establishment. What Young’s book heralded was the conquest of the establishment by meritocracy. The Conservative Party was led by two consecutive high school students: Edward Heath and Margaret Thatcher. Establishment types like Harold Macmillan and Quintin Hogg were derided into insignificance by a new generation of satirists like Peter Cook and Dudley Moore. Women poured into elite jobs and, somewhat more slowly, into the upper echelons of the economy. Being “self-made” went from being a mark of shame to the highest compliment. Thatcher’s government added to the high school clerks and academics entrepreneurs as solvents of the old society of rank and rank.

The second factor was the rise of permissive society, a term coined by flamboyant and gay Tory MP Norman St John Stevas. The government began to back out of the business of micromanaging morals even before it got out of the business of micromanaging the economy, led by a Labor Home Secretary, Roy Jenkins, but also hailed by Liberal Conservatives. “Intercourse began in 1963,” Philip Larkin famously said, two years after the birth of the pill. Homosexuality was decriminalized in 1967. The BBC used not only satire but also a more aggressive interview style and ended up treating politicians not so much as grandees but as criminals in the dock. Children whose births were registered to only one parent increased from 4% in the 1960s to 24% in the 1990s.

The third is harder to name: call it deindustrialization if you’re on the left, “the rise of entrepreneurial society” if you’re on the right, “creating a post-industrial society” if you’re a technocrat. Britain underwent arguably the greatest economic transformation of any country in Western Europe during the Queen’s reign. Gone are the big industrial blocs along with the unions that represented or misrepresented them throughout the 1970s. In their place is a service economy headed by some of the world’s highest-paid knowledge workers, but also by an army of casual workers working just-in-time. This economic revolution ended the bitter industrial dispute of the late 1970s. But it also provided the fuel for new disputes – the alienation of the former industrial North manifested in Brexit and a Scottish independence movement that could still succeed in dividing the Queen’s realm.

Britain’s anguish over which economic model to adopt is matched only by its anguish over relations with the rest of the world. The country has been fundamentally changed by globalization. In the 1980s, the City of London regained its Victorian status as a global financial center, although this time sharing a position with New York. The number of foreign-born workers doubled to 3.8 million between 1997 and 2007, the largest influx of immigrants in British history. For all their differences of opinion, Tony Blair and Boris Johnson both stood for ‘Global Britain’.

But what kind of globalization did people actually want?

Some thought that the only way Britain could go further was to join what was then the European Economic Community, or play a larger role in the European Union after it joined. “Europe today is the only way through which Britain … can maintain its historic role as a global player,” Blair said. Others said it must revitalize the old Commonwealth in the guise of a new Anglosphere. Still others declared that it should step away from formal ties and play the role of a buccaneering power in a world of vast global blocs, bound to no one but free to trade anywhere.

The result was a confused policy: first joining the EEC on the (deliberately) erroneous claim that it was nothing more than a common market, and then, after the most divisive debate of the Queen’s reign, exiting without bothering to make it clear the details of our relationship with the EU, let alone with the rest of the world. Suffice it to say in comment on Johnson’s tenure as Prime Minister that he has decided to celebrate the Queen’s 70th anniversary on the throne by reinstating imperial measures.

Such a painful shift might have torn other countries apart: It’s impossible to consider Donald Trump’s response to the storming of the Capitol, or the wider Republican Party’s response to losing the 2020 presidential election, without worrying about the Republic’s future make. It has certainly caused distress in Britain, particularly during the miners’ strike of the 1980s, but also more recently during the Brexit debates. But Britain has nonetheless weathered the grueling changes without losing its balance or its distinctive character.

There are many reasons for that. The transformation of the establishment into a meritocracy has prevented the emergence of an alienated intelligentsia. The major political parties have shown a genius for reform. The Tories have taken in immigrants (two of the three major offices of state, the Treasury and the Home Office, are occupied by ethnic minorities). The Labor Party has adapted to a new economy – despite a disastrous backslide under Jeremy Corbyn. Oxbridge Dons continue to dine by candlelight even as they shed light on exciting new areas of knowledge. Lawyers still wear horsehair wigs even when debating complicated corporate regulations.

The Queen has much to take credit for – not only by offering a point of continuity in a world that often seems to spiral out of control, but also by showing that old institutions can subtly adapt to change without losing some of their essential magic.

More from authors at Bloomberg Opinion:

• Britain takes school snobbery to new heights: Therese Raphael

• Anniversary parties won’t save Britain’s consumer economy: Andrea Felsted

• Britain begins to think the unthinkable: Life after the Queen: Martin Ivens

This column does not necessarily represent the opinion of the editors or of Bloomberg LP and its owners.

Adrian Wooldridge is the global economics columnist for Bloomberg Opinion. A former contributor to The Economist, he is most recently the author of The Aristocracy of Talent: How Meritocracy Made the Modern World.

For more stories like this, visit bloomberg.com/opinion

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Financial process in the Vatican sheds light on intrigues and rivalries at the papal court https://tac-lawna.org/financial-process-in-the-vatican-sheds-light-on-intrigues-and-rivalries-at-the-papal-court/ Tue, 31 May 2022 20:08:57 +0000 https://tac-lawna.org/financial-process-in-the-vatican-sheds-light-on-intrigues-and-rivalries-at-the-papal-court/ VATICAN CITY (RNS) – New testimony in the Vatican’s massive corruption trial on Tuesday (May 31) sheds light on rivalries in the Roman Curia and the role officials close to Pope Francis played in brokering the costly real estate deal that was settled in the The focus of the procedure is . Fabrizio Tirabassi, formerly […]]]>

VATICAN CITY (RNS) – New testimony in the Vatican’s massive corruption trial on Tuesday (May 31) sheds light on rivalries in the Roman Curia and the role officials close to Pope Francis played in brokering the costly real estate deal that was settled in the The focus of the procedure is .

Fabrizio Tirabassi, formerly in charge of investments at the Vatican’s Secretariat of State, testified before the Vatican tribunal that the Vatican’s decision to invest around $200 million in a luxury apartment complex in London was “abrupt and unjustified”.

This is the second time Tirabassi has testified before the Vatican court. At the most recent hearing, he was questioned by prosecutors about a previous deal the Secretariat was considering for an investment: an oil rig in Angola, which Tirabassi pointed out would address Francis’ environmental concerns outlined in his so-called “green encyclical” on the Expression came, strongly disagreed. Laudato Si.

Tirabassi, who was interrogated for seven hours on Tuesday, touched on the turf wars taking place within the Curia, particularly between the powerful State Secretariat and the Secretariat for Economic Affairs, which Francis created in 2014 to advance his financial reforms.

Tirabassi confirmed statements by other defendants that Giuseppe Milanese, a friend of Francis since he was bishop in Argentina, introduced the key players in the real estate business. He said that when Milanese, who is not among the accused, was presented at the secretariat, he was portrayed as having a “privileged relationship with the Holy Father”.

Milanese knew both Torzi and Mincione when they were involved in the securitization of Catholic hospital debt.

Cardinal George Pell answers a journalist’s question during an interview with The Associated Press on November 30, 2020 at his residence near the Vatican in Rome. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)

At the time of investing in the London property in 2014, Australian Cardinal George Pell was appointed head of the economic secretariat to work with Vatican chartered accountant Libero Milone.

But Milone was summarily ousted from the Vatican in 2017 after he was accused of spying on members of the Curia. In public interviews, he blamed Cardinal Angelo Becciu for his dismissal. Becciu, one of the ten defendants in the current trial and formerly the church’s third-ranking official, is also said to have often been involved in sexual abuse charges against Pell in Australia in 2017.

Eventually found innocent on appeal in 2020, Pell claims the secretariat of state, where Becciu was the deputy chief, may have played a role in sparking the charges.

Becciu has vehemently denied having anything to do with Pell’s legal troubles and told the court that Francis approved Milone’s removal.

Cardinal Angelo Becciu speaks to journalists during a news conference in Rome, in this September 25, 2020 file photo. Pope Francis approved spending up to €1 million to free a Colombian nun kidnapped by al-Qaeda-affiliated militants in Mali 5 British security and intelligence firm to find the nun and pay for her release.  (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)

Cardinal Angelo Becciu speaks to journalists during a news conference in Rome, in this September 25, 2020 file photo. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)

Vatican prosecutors cited evidence they claimed showed Milone had requested a review of the London deal and that Pell had asked for explanations regarding the Secretariat of State’s involvement in the investment, citing the Office of “Failure of the communication” accused.

In a document prosecutors submitted to the court, Tirabassi appeared to criticize the Economic Secretariat’s interference in the State Secretariat’s financial operations, which he said was against Vatican law at the time.

But Tirabassi defended the investment in the London property. “The Holy See has always invested in real estate,” he said, adding that this practice was often conducted by a Vatican agency called the Administrative Patrimony of the Holy See (APSA). He said that the State Secretariat has bought real estate for foreign embassies in the past.

Pope Francis stripped the Secretariat of State of its finances in December 2020, centralizing the Vatican’s economy and investments within the APSA.


TIED TOGETHER: Bishop McElroy of San Diego is made a cardinal by Pope Francis


The Vatican looked to invest in the London property in 2014 when it struck a deal with Italian financier Raffaele Mincione, who owned the property through a fund. In 2016, when the investment began losing significant amounts of money, the Vatican sought full ownership of the London properties. The Vatican approached another Italian businessman, Gianluigi Torzi, to help them become the sole owner of the property.

Torzi eventually signed an agreement with Vatican officials including Tirabassi in London in November 2018, but retained ownership of 1,000 voting shares, giving him final say over the property.

Tirabassi testified that he was unaware that the shares Torzi kept for himself gave him ultimate control of the properties.

The next hearing is scheduled for July 6, when the court will hear Mincione’s testimony.

A previous version of this article said that Libero Milone resigned from his post at the Vatican in 2016. The article was updated to say he resigned in 2017.


TIED TOGETHER: Pope Francis appoints cardinals, paving the way for the election of his successor


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