Church Community – TAC Lawna http://tac-lawna.org/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 14:37:23 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://tac-lawna.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-11-150x150.png Church Community – TAC Lawna http://tac-lawna.org/ 32 32 Greenwood Church Renovates Teachers’ Lounges at Local Schools – WISH-TV | Indianapolis News | Indiana weather https://tac-lawna.org/greenwood-church-renovates-teachers-lounges-at-local-schools-wish-tv-indianapolis-news-indiana-weather/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 13:18:31 +0000 https://tac-lawna.org/greenwood-church-renovates-teachers-lounges-at-local-schools-wish-tv-indianapolis-news-indiana-weather/ GREENWOOD, Ind. (WISH) – A Greenwood church is giving back to the community by renovating teachers’ lounges and creating special rooms just for educators. “Our goal is to make a difference in the church through the people who serve the community,” said Pastor Wayne Murray. Murray is the senior pastor at mercy assembly of God […]]]>

GREENWOOD, Ind. (WISH) – A Greenwood church is giving back to the community by renovating teachers’ lounges and creating special rooms just for educators.

“Our goal is to make a difference in the church through the people who serve the community,” said Pastor Wayne Murray.

Murray is the senior pastor at mercy assembly of God at Greenwood. His community is focused on helping teachers.

“Teachers make a huge difference in people’s lives, and if they are encouraged to do so, that will multiply to the students. So that’s one of the reasons we want to redesign the teachers’ lounge in every school we’ve served,” Murray said.

Photo Courtesy Grace Assembly of God

Each year, during a special day of worship, hundreds of people from the congregation renovate teachers’ lounges and areas in various schools. Think of the “Fixer Upper” school style. No more hard chairs and bright lights. Instead, brand new kitchens, appliances and sofas – all wrapped up in an upscale ambience.

“Many hands make easy work. So there’s so much you can accomplish when you work together,” Murray said.

It’s an attempt to help teachers rest, recharge, and remember that the community cares about them.

“When someone offers to make the teachers’ lounge a comfortable, warm, welcoming, welcoming place for teachers to retreat to — even for just five minutes a day. Just to refresh yourself and recharge your batteries. Wow wonderful! And we’re so grateful,” said Julie Young.

Young is the Principal of VO Isom Central Elementary School in Greenwood. The school’s teachers’ lounge underwent a surprise makeover in the summer of 2021.

“I think they’ve heard a thousand thanks from many of us because we’re just grateful to know that the community cares about them. They care enough to give us this place to charge – reset. So that we’re ready for kids anytime, anytime of the day,” Young said.

The Church made similar improvements to Greenwood Community High School this summer.

“I mean, how many times can you say thank you?” Michael Gasaway asked. “It’s just a cool looking place.”

Gasaway is the high school principal and can’t thank the volunteers enough.

Along with manpower and design skills, the church spent $30,000 on the teachers’ lounge and a new teachers-only gym. A place where employees can stay physically fit, healthy and whole. Perhaps they leave her most motivated by the simple act of kindness.

“The fact that the church and the volunteers — 200+ volunteers — came here for a reason and did it for no money and just gave… servant leadership is the best style of leadership for me, and when you have 200 church members you come in and serving a greater good than just themselves. They are doing exactly what we are meant to do as human beings,” Gasaway said.

A gift that the church says they will benefit most from.

“We are the ones who find joy in service. There is joy in giving, in serving, in blessing others,” Gasaway said.

Grace Assembly of God has also done service projects to repair buildings and landscapes at other schools. The church doesn’t know which staff room will be next, but plans to continue renovations in the future.

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After 10 years, the Delaware Church is still feeding the hungry https://tac-lawna.org/after-10-years-the-delaware-church-is-still-feeding-the-hungry/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 14:38:09 +0000 https://tac-lawna.org/after-10-years-the-delaware-church-is-still-feeding-the-hungry/ PRICES CORNER, Delaware — The Greenbank Church of Christ drive-thru pantry was buzzing with activity on a recent Thursday night as the church continued its 10-year tradition of offering free weekly meals to local families. Community residents drove past the pantry entrance and exited the Prices Corner property with enough food to feed their families […]]]>

PRICES CORNER, Delaware — The Greenbank Church of Christ drive-thru pantry was buzzing with activity on a recent Thursday night as the church continued its 10-year tradition of offering free weekly meals to local families.

Community residents drove past the pantry entrance and exited the Prices Corner property with enough food to feed their families through the end of the month.

“The pantry is a blessing,” said Senior Minister Domingo Reyes of the Greenbank Church. “People call us the best pantry, but we’re not in competition with anyone. We just do it from the heart.”

Church volunteers gave away a variety of prepackaged perishable and nonperishable foods, including meat, bread, vegetables, and pasta. As a partner of the Food Bank of Delaware, the items in the pantry all meet US Department of Agriculture requirements.

Sue Maynard, a pantry founder who processes orders for the program, said the supplies help families supplement the groceries they don’t have at home.

The weekly pantry, located near 511 Greenbank Road, is held every Thursday from 6pm to 6:45pm. It has been in operation for almost a decade and has grown significantly over the years.

Maynard and her husband Ed ran the program as it was formerly known as the Cedars Church of Christ Pantry. The name change to Greenbank relates to the merger of the Cedars Church of Christ and the First State Church of Christ.

Reyes previously served in the First State Church. He said the two churches — one predominantly white and one predominantly black — became one congregation in 2019.

“Cedars started that and the pantry is a big part of our story now,” Reyes said.

On November 1st, the pantry in Wilmington celebrates its 10th anniversary.

“The good Lord made it possible for us and I give him all my praise,” Maynard said, adding that a young couple attending the church came up with the idea in 2012.

Since its inception, the community has been very supportive of the pantry over the years. Maynard recalled when only four people showed up for their first meeting.

“By the end of 2012 we had 100 people and the next year up to 200 families came,” Maynard said. “I thought, woah — it takes a lot of volunteers for so many families.”

After the pandemic swept the nation in 2020, the pantry closed and later reopened in September in its current drive-thru model.

During the pandemic, Reyes said it’s important to ensure the church pantry reopens to anyone who may need help.

The program now serves 65 families each week. While the church has had to scale back the number of its services due to fewer volunteers and social distancing recommendations, the drive-thru model is more efficient, Maynard said.

Meal recipients must register on the Church website using the letter (AD first week, EL second week, MR third week, SV fourth week) that matches their family’s last name. According to Maynard, the number of family members determines how many bags of groceries each family receives at the drive-thru.

“We’ve actually found that this way we can spend more and offer more services because it’s a more organized operation now,” Maynard said. “We have no plans to distribute from the building again.”

In addition to the weekly free food distribution, Church volunteers also give away essential non-food items they receive.

“We won’t be opening a closet anytime soon, but we have a lot of other things coming up that we’re making sure the homeless get them … like gloves for the winter,” Maynard said. “We don’t want to waste anything.”

The Greenbank Church of Christ pantry is one of the largest emergency food distributors in the Wilmington area, according to the Food Bank of Delaware website.

Maynard estimates the pantry has distributed £6million of groceries since it opened.

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Your Dream General Conference Headlines; Are More Anti-BYU Boycotts Coming? https://tac-lawna.org/your-dream-general-conference-headlines-are-more-anti-byu-boycotts-coming/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 14:07:32 +0000 https://tac-lawna.org/your-dream-general-conference-headlines-are-more-anti-byu-boycotts-coming/ The Mormon Land Newsletter is the Salt Lake Tribune’s weekly highlight reel covering developments in and about The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Keep supporting us Patreon and get exclusive access to religious content for Tribune subscribers only, expanded newsletters, podcast transcripts and more. Generally speaking General conference seems to be the stuff […]]]>

The Mormon Land Newsletter is the Salt Lake Tribune’s weekly highlight reel covering developments in and about The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Keep supporting us Patreon and get exclusive access to religious content for Tribune subscribers only, expanded newsletters, podcast transcripts and more.

Generally speaking

General conference seems to be the stuff of dreams.

Our Mormonland readers had no trouble creating and sharing “dream headlines” they would like to see at next month’s gathering.

As expected, they ranged from silly to sober, hopeful to sad, and everything in between. We have received more than 340 responses and will publish them by the opening conference on October 1st.

Here is the first batch. See what you think:

— New First Presidency of two announced: Kirton & McConkie.

— Conference center to be repurposed to store gold bars.

— Apostles retire at 80.

— Clothing may only be worn in the temple.

— Biden won the election; everyone stops lying about it.

– If you plan to vote for Donald Trump, that becomes a Temple question. If yes, recommend no.

— We are building a temple in Jerusalem.

— The Salt Lake Temple renovation now includes solar panels.

— Counselors in dioceses involving women for the first time.

— Female priesthood leaders, sisters called to the Quorum of the Twelve.

– Coffee or tea? The Church relaxes the Word of Wisdom’s hot-drink stance “in moderation.”

— LDS Health Law Updated — Coffee is in; Lemonades are out (except for root beer).

(Illustration by Christopher Cherrington | The Salt Lake Tribune)

– The Church asks for your prayers on how to bring gays and lesbians back into the lap.

– Memorial announced to honor the First Lady of the Church, Fanny Alger.

– BYU lifts waiver on clergy confidentiality and vows to end distrust of faculty.

– ‘We apologize.’

— “I want to apologize to the LGBTQ+ community,” Oaks said in a historic conversation.

— Full disclosure of how tithe money is spent. Annual budgets and inventory are posted to all members through the Church website.

— Disclosure of property holdings. Church now owns everything.

— The church is building homeless centers in several major world cities.

— The abuse hotline has been moved to social services run by social workers; Church Ends Hotline Relationship With Attorneys.

— “Everything has already been said,” explains Nelson. ‘Let’s just party.’

— The church is reconfiguring all buildings for the drive-up tithing.

– “Multilevel Mormonism” plan revealed. Members receive 2% of tithing back for future converts.

– Donny Osmond was called to the Seventies because “any dream is enough”.

— The church adds the proclamation of the family to its standard works.

– Nelson says changing the name of the Book of Mormon to the New American Testament is a victory for Jesus.

— First gay apostle is announced.

— The church donates half of the Ensign Peak fund to end world poverty.

— Other charitable group donations accepted as tithing.

—Women who can heal and bless, as they did when the Church was organized.

— Latest revelation: Cleaning the chapel toilets is no longer necessary.

Speaking of the conference

According to a press release, in-person attendance at the October 1 and 2 sessions at the downtown Salt Lake City Conference Center will be limited due to construction in and around Temple Square.

How limited? That has yet to be announced. In April, tickets were capped at 10,000 per session, or about half capacity.

Also, the Saturday evening meeting will be a general session.

Back to the future with anti-BYU positions?

(Gary McCullough | AP) South Carolina head coach Dawn Staley, shown in 2020, has postponed her team’s streak with BYU.

Defending NCAA champion South Carolina’s decision to cancel its home-and-home women’s basketball series with Brigham Young University after reports of a racial outburst at a recent BYU volleyball game stems from earlier athletic protests against the Provo -school back.

Most notably, perhaps, a football game 53 years ago.

Fourteen African Americans on the University of Wyoming team planned to do a civil rights game on October 18, 1969, when the Cowboys were hosting the Cougars. Their game plan: Wear black armbands to protest the church’s racist policies, which at the time prevented black men from holding the priesthood and black women and men from entering temples.

But the players were thrown out before kick-off. Her coach kicked her out of the team the night before the game.

Today, the church’s priesthood/temple ban is history, the cowboys and cougars are not in the same league, and surviving members of the “Black 14” have traded those armbands for linked arms with the Utah-based faith.

The Cowboy Graduates — with their Mind, Body, and Spirit initiative — partnered with the church two years ago to deliver tons of food to vulnerable communities across the country.

(You can read more about the Black 14 here and listen to a Mormon Land podcast featuring one of the players whose son eventually converted to Mormonism.)

Other anti-BYU demonstrations and boycotts erupted during the civil rights era, according to the Utah Historical Quarterly, including in Fort Collins, Colorado; San Jose, California; and El Paso, Texas.

In recent years, advocates have lobbied to keep BYU out of the Big 12 because the school — and by extension the church — opposes same-sex marriage and its positions on other LGBTQ issues. The Cougars have since joined the Big 12 and are scheduled to begin league play next year.

But could South Carolina’s withdrawal be just the beginning of a new round of postponements, protests and boycotts? After all, Dawn Staley, the South Carolina women’s basketball coach and the first black coach, male or female, to win two Division I basketball crowns, is an influential voice.

“As a head coach, my job is to do what is best for my players and staff,” Staley said. “The incident at BYU caused me to re-evaluate our home and I don’t think this is the right time for us to be a part of this series.”

The latest Mormon Land podcast: BYU Fallout continues

• On this week’s show, BYU graduate student Darron Smith, who teaches sociology at the University of Memphis and is the author of “When Race, Religion & Sports Collide: Black Athletes at BYU and Beyond,” discusses the volleyball game episode and its aftermath Fallout, the history of the school with black athletes, and why BYU and Latter-day Saint leaders need to do much more to address racism on campus and within the faith — beginning with an apology for the former priesthood/temple ban of the Church for Black Members.

Listen.

Call for Peace in the Sunshine State

Similar to its efforts in Utah, Arizona and Georgia, the church has joined with community leaders in Florida to call for legislation that protects LGBTQ people from discrimination while upholding religious freedom.

“We are extremely concerned that the ongoing conflicts between religious rights and LGBTQ rights are poisoning our civil discourse, undermining freedom of worship and preventing diverse people of good will from living together in peace and mutual respect,” it said in an “open letter.” “. the Tampa Bay Times, signed by Area Seventies Victor P. Patrick and Daniel P. Amato and dozens of other faith and civic leaders (using language that parrots much of the Georgia effort). “…We join a growing number of faith and community leaders from across the country in supporting anti-discrimination legislation that protects all people from discrimination in employment, housing and public accommodation, while protecting important religious rights.”

The letter asserts that “LGBTQ rights and religious rights need not be at odds” and urges the parties to “put aside political motives, malice and misrepresentation and commit to respectful dialogue and good faith engagement.” “.

Apostle Dallin H. Oaks, First Counselor in the First Presidency, advocated a similar path in a landmark address at the University of Virginia last year.

From the stands

(Francisco Kjolseth | The Salt Lake Tribune) A volunteer walks between Pride flags at a Back to School Pride Night for BYU students in Provo on Saturday, September 3, 2022.

• Christian nationalists are threatening the separation of church and state on which the US was founded, writes Salt Lake Tribune columnist Gordon Monson.

• Anti-LGBTQ protesters protested a Back to School Pride Night in Provo for BYU students.

• The Tribune provided links to significant stories and podcasts about the advances and stumbles in race relations over the past decade at BYU and in the broader church.

• Read excerpts from last week’s Mormon Land podcast about how BYU is trying to stay in the mainstream while still being different from “the world.”

• Federal officials are investigating a July arson attack on the Latter-day Saint Temple under construction in Orem.

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Transforming the lives of children through early childhood development centers https://tac-lawna.org/transforming-the-lives-of-children-through-early-childhood-development-centers/ Wed, 07 Sep 2022 06:01:50 +0000 https://tac-lawna.org/transforming-the-lives-of-children-through-early-childhood-development-centers/ In communities around the world, parents and caregivers dream of their children’s futures and hope to see them grow and thrive. A child’s first five years of life are an integral part of realizing those dreams and provide critical building blocks for lifelong development. However, for many parents and carers in Burundi, balancing the developmental […]]]>

In communities around the world, parents and caregivers dream of their children’s futures and hope to see them grow and thrive. A child’s first five years of life are an integral part of realizing those dreams and provide critical building blocks for lifelong development.

However, for many parents and carers in Burundi, balancing the developmental needs of young children with the financial responsibilities of supporting a family can seem overwhelming. With few childcare options, families often face a daily, impossible choice: leave their children at home alone, or lose the income or harvest from daily labor.

That choice is even more unimaginable for children who have unique developmental needs that, if not met, can leave them vulnerable to a lifetime of challenges—kids like Rita.

A neighbor in need

When Rita was only two years old, her mother was violently attacked and killed while carrying her daughter on her back. Rita was injured and was in a coma for three weeks. When she woke up, she had lost her speech and was struggling to socialize with other children, often displaying aggressive behavior.

Rita’s aunt took her in, but was overwhelmed with the day-to-day demands of caring for her and providing for her financially. She couldn’t leave Rita at home alone. She also couldn’t stop working if she wanted to put food on her table.

With her family in dire straits, Rita’s aunt turned to her local church for support. It was then that she came into contact with one of World Relief’s Early Child Development Centers (ECD).

Caring for the child and caregivers

In partnership with UNICEF Burundi and local communities, we have opened 11 ECD centers in World Relief Burundi’s Church Empowerment Zones. Each center is run by members of the local community and serves up to 50 children between the ages of two and five. Centers provide trusted care, a nutritious daily meal, and plenty of opportunities to socialize and play with other children in a safe environment.

Not only do the centers give parents peace of mind that their children are safe and well cared for while they work, but they are also helping to transform how children are cared for throughout the community—including at home.

ECD center volunteers, many of whom are parents themselves, are trained in positive parenting, child protection, child development and nutrition – lessons they apply and pass on at the centres, in their neighborhoods and at home.

In a country where currently 56% of children suffer from chronic malnutrition, 90% of children aged 1-14 are physically punished by caregivers and only 7% of children aged 3-5 are in early childhood development programs participate, World Relief Burundi’s ECD centers play an important role in helping local communities create a foundation for children to reach their full potential.

A transformed life

For Rita, enrolling in her community’s ECD center changed her life. When she first started attending school, she struggled to connect with her classmates. However, through the sensitive social and emotional care she receives there, Rita has now regained her speech, shares toys and plays well with other children, and demonstrates positive behavior at home and in the community!

While not all children will rise to the challenges Rita faces, the same community-focused programming that helped her can help more families overcome life’s obstacles. By taking good care of those who are at risk, we can build entire communities and help more children reach their full potential.

The way to a better future

With the support of UNICEF and other donors, World Relief Burundi has so far reached over 500 children under the age of five through its 11 ECD pilot centres. The program has been praised by parents, community leaders and even elementary school teachers, who find that children who have attended the centers outperform their peers in their first year of elementary school.

In addition, the child development tools developed during the pilot program were so successful that the Government of Burundi has approved them for roll-out nationwide. We will open seven more ECD centers in Burundi before the end of the year to allow even more families to thrive.

At World Relief, we want every child to have every opportunity to reach their full potential and we believe local communities are best positioned to make that dream come true. World Relief Burundi’s community-run ECD centers play an integral role in caring for children and caregivers as we move together toward a better future.

Pave the way to lasting change for more families like Rita’s. When you join The Path—World Relief’s community of monthly donors—you work with parents and churches around the world who are building a better future for their children. It takes all of us to pave the way for lasting change, and you have a role to play.


dana couple currently works as a program officer at World Relief. Before joining World Relief, she worked in programming for adolescent girls in the Portland, Oregon area. She is passionate about empowering women and girls to create lasting change in their communities.

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Stained glass Jesus Stay Church is converted into apartments https://tac-lawna.org/stained-glass-jesus-stay-church-is-converted-into-apartments/ Mon, 05 Sep 2022 05:06:24 +0000 https://tac-lawna.org/stained-glass-jesus-stay-church-is-converted-into-apartments/ By SARAH ELLIS, The State COLUMBIA, SC (AP) — Columbia’s old Rosewood Baptist Church may never look like a church. When residents move into modern new homes at the 50-year-old sanctuary this fall, they will place their dining tables under 40-foot arched windows that were once filled with stained glass. Its decor is flanked by […]]]>

By SARAH ELLIS, The State

COLUMBIA, SC (AP) — Columbia’s old Rosewood Baptist Church may never look like a church.

When residents move into modern new homes at the 50-year-old sanctuary this fall, they will place their dining tables under 40-foot arched windows that were once filled with stained glass. Its decor is flanked by the dark oak paneling of the old church; some will have the white-painted concrete block walls of the former Sunday school classrooms. Someone’s sitting room will sit roughly on the footprint of what used to be the baptismal font.

And one unique apartment will feature a 20ft high stained glass mosaic of Jesus Christ with arms and hands outstretched. (A local construction worker cheekily referred to the apartment as the “Jesus Suite.”)

The unmistakable church tower towers over everything.

Political cartoons

“During design, one of the first things we talked about was the steeple,” said Frank Cason, whose Columbia development group is conducting the church’s transformation along with architects Garvin Design Group and Boyer Construction at the corner of Sloan Street and Rosewood Journey. “I was . . . inclined to, shall we take this off? And our architect said it will always be a church. It will always be read like a church. why would you take that off That will not make it any less of a church.”

So they kept the steeple.

The apartments, dubbed 5th and Sloan, are evolving into a carefully considered mix of old and new; Even the name of the complex under construction is an ode to the historical name Rosewood Drive, 5th Avenue.

The apartments also represent, possibly for the first time in Colombia, the transformation of a traditional church sanctuary into something other than a church. It’s a transition that’s happened in other places — for example, the current Church and Union restaurant in downtown Charleston, not to mention apartments, gyms, breweries, skate parks, and a host of other new uses for churches, usually in places further along outside the Bible Belt. But it’s still a novel concept in a region traditionally known for a multitude of churches around every corner, figuratively (and sometimes literally).

In many ways, the conversion of the church into apartments represents a bridge between the past and the future of this place in Colombia. And it’s still a nod to a church community that hasn’t disappeared, but occupies a smaller space further down the Rosewood corridor has settled as the community has shrunk in recent years.

Cason jumped at the opportunity to undertake the transformative project almost as soon as the church building hit the market in 2019, believing the structure could be saved and repurposed. Some people in the community thought it would be converted into a brewery, while others couldn’t believe Cason would even consider touching the sanctuary, the developer said.

Since work began on the site last October, deciding what details can and should be preserved as construction progresses has been an almost daily task, Cason said.

“The big challenge is … it’s a new use for the structure while maintaining the fact that there was a church and we don’t want to hide that and we don’t want to lose that,” Cason said. “That’s part of the charm.”

As a city, Colombia attaches great importance to the preservation of monuments. And while the rosewood church building itself has no historical designation, the structure and the community it once filled hold “meaningfulness” to the surrounding community, Cason said.

“It can be cheaper to tear things down and start over,” the developer acknowledged. “There is a place to tear down and a place to keep. Just because a building is old doesn’t mean it should be preserved, and just because it would be easier to demolish doesn’t mean it should be. … So we want to have historic properties where you can blend them with something new; you can complement them.”

The 49 apartments at 5th and Sloan are expected to open to residents in October. A mix of one and two bedroom units, some two stories high, will be spread across the former sanctuary, classroom building and a newly constructed building in between. The complex will include a fitness center, residents’ lounge and courtyard, and several apartments will have exterior balconies. Rents range from $1,425 to $2,400.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, transcribed or redistributed.

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One Way inaugurates new parish hall https://tac-lawna.org/one-way-inaugurates-new-parish-hall/ Sat, 03 Sep 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://tac-lawna.org/one-way-inaugurates-new-parish-hall/ Steven Lee, pastor of One Way Pentecostal Apostolic Church, stands in the pulpit with Crawfordsville Mayor Todd Barton in 2020. Photo of the Journal Review file Tina McGrady | tmcgrady@jrpress.com Pastor Steven Lee continues his late father’s mission in a new home. Lee is a son of longtime apostolic pastor and advocate for the church, […]]]>

Tina McGrady | tmcgrady@jrpress.com

Pastor Steven Lee continues his late father’s mission in a new home.

Lee is a son of longtime apostolic pastor and advocate for the church, Bishop Clarence Lee, who died in May. Lee and members of the One Way Pentecostal Apostolic Church recently celebrated the dedication of their new home at 711 Curtis St.

Celebrations on August 26 also included Lee receiving the title of bishop—like his father, who organized the church in 1987.

The service included comments of praise and worship and congratulatory comments from family members and other church officials, as well as Crawfordsville Mayor Todd Barton and Deputy Police Commissioner Bob Rivers.

“First and foremost, I want to say congratulations,” Barton said. “When a church grows beyond its institution, something is going right.”

In 2020, after years of downtown worship at a former Wesleyan church on South Green Street, the church purchased the former Milligan Memorial Presbyterian Church on Mill Street. They soon grew again and bought the former Church of God building on Curtis Street.

The mayor thanked the community for being a beacon and beacon of hope in the community.

“Our nation, our world, our community faces challenges, every community faces challenges, and every person in our community fights battles every day … but you make a difference in people’s lives,” he said.

Barton praised Lee for carrying on his father’s legacy.

“A church isn’t made great by its buildings or even its leaders, a church is made great by its people, and what you’re doing here makes our church a great place,” Barton said.

Raised in the Lee family, Rivers witnessed firsthand their dedication to their faith and community.

“You’ve done a lot of good for this church and what a testament to Pastor Steve and what he’s doing … growing out of your church just shows what he and his family have done and continue to do for this church.”

Lee and his wife, Tamara, serve the local church, which totals about 100 members. They are assisted by Assistant Pastor Marcus Ellis and his wife Sharon, and several assistant pastors and ministers who make up the worship team.

Worship services are held on Wednesdays at 7 p.m. and Sundays at 2 p.m. For more information, visit the church’s Facebook page.


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Church Events for September 1, 2022 | news https://tac-lawna.org/church-events-for-september-1-2022-news/ Thu, 01 Sep 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://tac-lawna.org/church-events-for-september-1-2022-news/ CHURCH FOOTBALL LEAGUE DEADLINE: Abundant Life Christian Fellowship will sponsor a fall soccer league for children ages 4 to adults. Registration closes on Tuesday September 6th and the first game will take place on Sunday September 18th. Abundant Life Christian Fellowship is located at 19103 Brick Church Road in Orange. Visit www.ALCF-Orange to register or […]]]>

CHURCH FOOTBALL LEAGUE DEADLINE: Abundant Life Christian Fellowship will sponsor a fall soccer league for children ages 4 to adults. Registration closes on Tuesday September 6th and the first game will take place on Sunday September 18th. Abundant Life Christian Fellowship is located at 19103 Brick Church Road in Orange. Visit www.ALCF-Orange to register or call Pastor/Coach Dwane Pugh at 672-9867 with questions.

OPERATION CHRISTMAS CHILD: Open Door Baptist Church, 754 Germanna Highway, Culpeper, is hosting a workshop on Friday, September 9 at 7 p.m. for those organizing shoe box gift wrapping for churches or organizations. For more information email northcentralvaocc@gmail.com or visit samaritanspurse.org.

HOMECOMING SERVICE: Rock Hall Baptist Church will hold its homecoming service on Sunday, September 11 at 12 noon. guest preacher Dr. Donald King of Mt. Gilliam Baptist Church in Louisa will lead the service. Lunch will be served after the service. For more information, call (540) 407-0667.

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GOOD SAMARITAN HOURS: Good Samaritan Inc., based at 105 North Madison Road, Orange, announces new hours of operation to help those in need. It is open every Thursday and Friday from 12:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. For assistance or information call (540) 842-1488.

RESUME OF HOGT SERVICES: House Of God Tabernacle, 109 N. Madison Road, Orange, announces new hours of operation. Sunday school begins at 10:30 a.m., followed immediately by morning service at 11:30 a.m. Join via Zoom: https://us04web.zoom.us/j/409497648 or call: 1-646-558-8656 Meeting ID: 409 497 648.

WEDNESDAY PRAYER, THURSDAY BIBLE STUDY: You are Loved Ministries offers “Parents in Prayer” every Thursday at 3:30 p.m. at 119 Chapman St., Orange. Join Pastor Claire Carter and others in praying for children, schools, bus drivers and other members of the church. There is a Bible study and dinner every Thursday at 4:30 p.m. Call (540) 661-2948 for more information.

REGISTRATION BESSED ASSURANCE: Blessed Assurance Christian School at North Pamunkey Baptist Church announces enrollment for the 2022-23 school year. Classes begin on Tuesday, September 6th and will be held on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays from 9am to 12pm. Children must be 2 ½ to 4 years old to participate. To register or for more information, call (540) 854-4847.

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The Black Mountain Presbyterian Church fights food insecurity https://tac-lawna.org/the-black-mountain-presbyterian-church-fights-food-insecurity/ Tue, 30 Aug 2022 13:29:20 +0000 https://tac-lawna.org/the-black-mountain-presbyterian-church-fights-food-insecurity/ (PNS) – When Margo Smith thinks of Black Mountain Presbyterian Church’s commitment to addressing food insecurity and other needs of the western North Carolina community, she is reminded of an engraving inside the church’s sanctuary. “The words engraved on our communion table outside the sanctuary are ‘Were all fed?’ That message is why I joined […]]]>

(PNS) – When Margo Smith thinks of Black Mountain Presbyterian Church’s commitment to addressing food insecurity and other needs of the western North Carolina community, she is reminded of an engraving inside the church’s sanctuary.

“The words engraved on our communion table outside the sanctuary are ‘Were all fed?’ That message is why I joined BMPC,” said Smith. “It’s hard to feel satisfied when we’re constantly reminded that service is our mission.”

BMPC, located in the town of Black Mountain, about 15 miles from Asheville, North Carolina, is among more than 100 churches that have earned the distinction of being named Hunger Action Congregations of the Presbyterian Hunger Program (PHP).

Churches like Black Mountain that are active in six areas can become certified HACs (More information can be found here. Deadline is September.) These areas are hunger alleviation, foreign aid, hunger awareness, lifestyle integrity, corporate and public policy witness and worship.

“The Hunger Action Congregation process celebrates the faithful work of Presbyterians across the country in responding to the biblical call to alleviate hunger and end its causes,” notes PHP on the HAC website. “Through stories and encouragement, we want to inspire one another to provide broader and more equitable ministries.”

The fight against hunger has been a major concern of the Black Mountain Presbyterian Church for many years. The church, which is also an Earth Care Congregation, is in an area where housing prices can present hardship for those with just a few dollars left after paying for a place to live.

“Even if you live in Montreat or parts of Black Mountain, which are very beautiful areas, you can’t drive into town and not realize there is need everywhere,” said Smith, a longtime member of the missions committee that chairs the Strategic Planning Committee leads and is also present at the meeting. “You are not isolated from the need in the community.”

Much of the work that BMPC does is done through collaboration with various groups and religious organizations in the region, which has several active denominations.

Teens take part in a program to feed families on Thanksgiving. (Photo courtesy of Black Mountain Presbyterian Church)

“It’s hard to find someone who isn’t involved in social action,” Smith said. “We’ve got a concentration of good old Calvinist Presbyterian folk, and you know, service to humanity is service to God.”

One of the ways BMPC is involved is by supporting Bounty and Soul, a local organization dedicated to providing nutritious nutrition and wellness education, and the Swannanoa Valley Christian Ministry, which provides crisis services run by a pantry to ancillary services.

“We have had a close connection with both of these organizations from the beginning of the organization and throughout all things that have happened since, including Covid,” Smith said.

Bounty and Soul, a nonprofit partner of BMPC founded by Ali Casparian, shares hundreds of boxes of local groceries with the community each week at their free fresh markets.

“We believe our community is at the center of everything we do, and so participating in this movement together helps us better reach a broader range of our neighbors,” said Karla Gardner, director of community engagement at Bounty and Soul. “As a whole, our community can thrive and be healthy (and) connected when we all work together.”

One way that’s happening is through volunteers from BMPC, Gardner said. “Volunteers are a crucial part of our work to continue sharing food with our community. In the last two years alone, our community has doubled during Covid. Not only are we sourcing record amounts of food, but we also need the support of volunteers to keep things moving.”

BMPC also helps support Christian ministry in the Swannanoa Valley, whether that be through member volunteerism, collecting canned goods, participating in fundraisers, adopting families for the holidays or providing furniture for transitional housing, said Executive Director Cheryl Wilson who also happens to be a BMPC member and ruling elder.

Black Mountain is “a very, very committed church with ministry that we’re so grateful for,” Wilson said. The church is three to four blocks away, “so it’s very close by, and there’s a lot of retired Presbyterian pastors — my father’s one — and missionaries, and so the hands and feet and the heart are for others, I think, just ingrained in so many that are part of our community and that just helps us teach that to our boys.”

Another way BMPC is active in the community and fighting hunger is through garden projects.

“We have a community garden where people get plots and create their own plots,” and a portion of the produce goes to Bounty and Soul, Smith said. Additionally, “we have an ecumenical garden with the Baptist Church across the street from us,” which also helps provide produce to the congregation.

Other projects BMPC is involved with are youth making Thanksgiving baskets and there is a preschool program that includes a garden and composting and farm-to-table snacks.

The church also participates in advocacy efforts such as Bread for the World letter campaigns and assists the western North Carolina presbytery in efforts such as paying off medical debts.

“Black Mountain Presbyterian is doing so many great things to help end hunger and poverty in all six areas as a certified Hunger Action Congregation,” said Andrew Kang Bartlett, PHP national staffer. “But remember, no matter the size of your church, every act and ministry you do to end suffering and injustice reflects Christian compassion and the healing power of God flowing through us.”

by Darla Carter | Presbyterian News Service

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Parishioners Recall Gary Bishop Emeritus Dale Melczek’s Life of Church Service, Parish – Chicago Tribune https://tac-lawna.org/parishioners-recall-gary-bishop-emeritus-dale-melczeks-life-of-church-service-parish-chicago-tribune/ Sun, 28 Aug 2022 21:50:00 +0000 https://tac-lawna.org/parishioners-recall-gary-bishop-emeritus-dale-melczeks-life-of-church-service-parish-chicago-tribune/ The Catholic faithful gathered Sunday to bid farewell to Bishop Emeritus Dale J. Melczek, third bishop of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Gary. Melczek’s body, in a modest wooden coffin, was escorted by the Knights of Columbus Holy Sepulcher Honor Guard to the Cathedral of the Holy Angels in Gary. Most Reverend Bishop Robert J. […]]]>

The Catholic faithful gathered Sunday to bid farewell to Bishop Emeritus Dale J. Melczek, third bishop of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Gary.

Melczek’s body, in a modest wooden coffin, was escorted by the Knights of Columbus Holy Sepulcher Honor Guard to the Cathedral of the Holy Angels in Gary. Most Reverend Bishop Robert J. McClory received the body at the cathedral for the rite of reception and sprinkled the coffin with holy water, symbolizing baptism.

Melczek, 83, died in hospice early Thursday morning after suffering an irreparable stroke over the weekend. He dies just six days after celebrating his 30th anniversary in Diocese of Gary on Aug. 19, the diocese said. Melzcek was bishop from 1992 until his retirement in 2015. He was then called to be a pastor at St. Mary of the Lake Parish in Gary.

McClory said it was fitting that Melczek would be sent home in the cathedral, which was named in honor of the saints and angels he restored as bishop. He said Melczek is with the saints and holy angels who gather in a cloud around believers to encourage and strengthen them.

McClory said Melczek lived a life of service and is an example of how giving of yourself for the benefit of others makes your life more fruitful.

“He was a tireless servant, a compassionate pastor, and a hopeful leader,” McLory said.

Priests carefully tended Melczek’s body, placing the bishop’s miter – a tall double-tailed hat – on his head so that he could be seen before mourners streamed by to pay their respects.

Jane Callies, from Chesterton, dabbed tears in her eyes throughout the ceremony. She and her husband Tom Wisch and their sons Gus, 14, and Jake, 12, met Melczek when he became a pastor at St. Mary of the Lake Church.

They became members of the congregation during the “Year of Opportunity” that began on Easter Sunday 2015, when Melczek and parishioners worked to save the church from a diocesan planned closure. Callies was baptized Catholic and Wisch had received the sacraments but was not practicing when they returned to church.

“He was just so welcoming and accepted,” Callies said.

The couple originally married in 2006 and were then remarried just before their 10th anniversary by Melczek in the church.

“Bishop Dale conducted the ceremony at St. Mary of the Lake,” she said. Melczek also confirmed her and baptized her two boys.

“He was just a sweet man. He was always willing to do anything to be friendly,” said Wisch.

Callies said she will miss his acceptance and involvement and hopes the next priest to take on the role of leading the congregation will have similar feelings.

“I’ll miss that. I hope that the person who comes in as the next parish minister will be as open and welcoming as the bishop,” Callies said.

Carole Barnes and her husband Rich, who live in the Miller area of ​​Gary, said they missed Melczek. Carole Barnes is a member of St. Mary of the Lake while Rich is not Catholic. The couple work together to run the congregation’s pantry, a venture started by Melczek after he took over the church.

She said she caught up with Melczek just last week to talk about the pantry and her successful efforts to find someone to take over when she retires. Barnes said she was glad she was able to let Melczek know that something he was so passionate about would continue.

“He was just a wonderful man,” she said.

Melzcek was appointed bishop of the 50-year-old Diocese of Gary in June 1996, with Cardinal Edmund Szoka, Archbishop Emeritus of Detroit, presiding over Melczek’s inauguration. Pope John Paul II appointed Melczek Auxiliary Bishop of Detroit in 1982 and Cardinal Szoka ordained him Bishop of the Archdiocese of Detroit in 1983. Melczek was born in Detroit, the eldest of three children of Aloysius and Geraldine Melczek. In 1964 he was ordained a priest in the Archdiocese of Detroit.

In 1992, after his predecessor Bishop Norbert F. Gaughan suffered a stroke, Pope John Paul II appointed Melczek as “apostolic administrator” for the Diocese of Gary before eventually taking over the full-time duties of Gaughan, who retired to St. Anthony’s home in Crown Point before his death at the age of 78 in October 1999.

Melczek is buried in Holy Angels Cathedral alongside the late Bishop Andrew G. Grutka, the first bishop of the Diocese of Gary.

The visit will continue on Monday from 8.30am to 9.45am at the Cathedral of the Holy Angels, followed by morning prayer. The Christian Funeral Mass begins at 10:30am in the Cathedral, followed by a light lunch. All liturgies are open to the public and will also be streamed live on the diocesan YouTube channel (dcgary.org).

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Funeral for OCSO Sgt. Swartz at NW OKC Church https://tac-lawna.org/funeral-for-ocso-sgt-swartz-at-nw-okc-church/ Fri, 26 Aug 2022 18:14:19 +0000 https://tac-lawna.org/funeral-for-ocso-sgt-swartz-at-nw-okc-church/ Click here for the funeral service for Oklahoma County Sgt. Bobby Swartz Family, friends and much of law enforcement will be in attendance Friday to honor the life of Oklahoma County Assemblyman Bobby Swartz. The ceremony will be held at 1 p.m. at Crossings Community Church on Portland Avenue. The public is invited. Related: 1 […]]]>

Click here for the funeral service for Oklahoma County Sgt. Bobby Swartz

Family, friends and much of law enforcement will be in attendance Friday to honor the life of Oklahoma County Assemblyman Bobby Swartz.

The ceremony will be held at 1 p.m. at Crossings Community Church on Portland Avenue.

The public is invited.

Related: 1 deputy killed, another deputy wounded in SW OKC shooting

Swartz was shot after arriving at a home in southwest Oklahoma City to deliver eviction papers.

Oklahoma County Sheriff Tommie Johnson said three deputies arrived at a home near Southwest 78th Street and South Pennsylvania Avenue just after 1 p.m. Monday.

Upon arrival, Johnson said MPs learned the subject in the House was uncooperative. The deputies went to the back of the house, where shots were fired at them.

Two deputy sheriffs, including Sergeant Bobby Swartz, were hit.

Related: Oklahoma Co. Sheriff, OKC Police Chief Reveals New Details of Deadly Deputy Shooting

The police search for alleged suspect Benjamin Plank continued with a brief pursuit through the southeast of the city.

Plank drove a pickup truck with a boat attached.

The suspect exited his vehicle and was taken into custody by authorities near Tinker Air Force Base.

Plank was arrested for first degree murder, he shot with intent to kill and attack and attack with a dangerous weapon.

News 9 will cover the funeral in detail during an hour-long News 9 at noon.

News 9 will air the 1 p.m. funeral on the News 9 website and app.

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