Campaign for the Democratic candidates on the weekend before elementary school

The Democratic candidates for governor and lieutenant governor broke out of a drowsy political pace and spent the last weekend before Tuesday’s primary campaign.

Gov. Kathy Hochul took part in Sunday’s Pride March in the West Village while her two main opponents spoke at a church in Harlem.


what you need to know

  • The Democratic nominees for governor and lieutenant governor spent the final weekend leading up to Tuesday’s primary race
  • Gov. Kathy Hochul took part in Sunday’s Pride March in the West Village while her two main opponents spoke at a church in Harlem
  • All public polls have shown Hochul to be comfortably ahead of both of their rivals, but the lieutenant governor’s race is much more difficult to gauge

There was a different kind of energy along the march route after last week’s massive news. As people celebrated Pride, the Supreme Court decision in Roe v. Overthrowing Wade, a reminder that rights must always be fought for.

Hochul said she is very aware of the challenge.

“They’re trying everything they can to send a message that this was on the ballot before,” she said. “And when Donald Trump won, they now believe they have the right to take all our rights away from us. Well, that doesn’t happen in America. We are freedom fighters. We will continue to fight for our freedoms.”

Hochul was the only Democratic nominee for governor to attend the march. Her opponent, Rep. Tom Suozzi, campaigned in Brooklyn and Queens and spoke at the Abyssinian Baptist Church in Harlem.

“At the beginning of this campaign, I was in a church in southeast Queens and the pastor stood up and said, ‘If God is for us, who can be against us?’ And ‘Romans 8:31’ appeared at the top of the screen,” Suozzi said. “Well, I didn’t know it was Romans 8:31, but I felt like God was speaking to me right there and then because my birthday is August 31.”

Public Advocate Jumaane Williams also spoke at Abyssinian ahead of Tuesday’s election.

“I’m running because you know the work I’ve done for public safety, housing and the economy. But we also lost 70,000 people during this pandemic,” Williams said. “And I keep hearing our leaders say they need to get back to normal. And I keep saying no, I don’t want to go back to normal because it didn’t work for Abyssinian, it didn’t work for Harlem, and it didn’t work for New York State.

The candidates for the office of lieutenant governor also spent the day campaigning. Ana Maria Archila marched at the Pride March. She also spoke about abortion rights.

“Yes, I think this moment is a moment that reminds us that our rights are not set in stone,” she said. “If we don’t protect them, they will be undone. There is a tiny minority that is extreme and has taken over the Supreme Court.”

All public polls have shown Hochul to be comfortably ahead of both of their rivals, but the lieutenant governor’s race is much more difficult to gauge.

There hasn’t been much polling and it looks like the turnout is very low, which will affect the outcome.

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